Owen Lloyd, Ross Dant Give Full Account of 1,650 DQ at ACCs

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After winning the ACC title in the men’s 1,650 free, Owen Lloyd was DQ’ed for interfering with another swimmer during his celebration, resulting in his teammate, Ross Dant, being declared the victor after he had initially finished 2nd. Owen Lloyd and Ross Dant joined SwimSwam to give their full perspective on the matter.

  • 0:00 Owen Lloyd & Ross Dant Introduction
  • 1:27 Starting the ACC Championships
  • 5:45 Racing the 1,650 Free
  • 7:45 The Celebration
  • 13:11 Processing the DQ
  • 21:04 Winning the ACC Team Title
  • 24:42 Getting Ready for NCAA Championships

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Steve Nolan
1 month ago

People are still semi commenting here, but literally yesterday this was the most read story on The Athletic:

https://theathletic.com/5304123/2024/03/01/nc-state-swimmer-acc-championship/

People really hate this!

Alex
1 month ago

I have to say that I disagree with most of the comments on this post. I was a competitive swimmer, and it was always drilled in our heads by coaches and officials to stay in your lane until all swimmers finished. Not sure why it would be any different at ACCs or presumably NCAAs.

There’s plenty of space to celebrate in your lane and you can always hop up on the lane line after everyone finishes. Obviously, the result of the race was never in doubt, but rules are rules. I think there’s a lesson to be learned here and I genuinely feel sorry for the kid, but that’s how it goes.

BGray
1 month ago

Regarding Amy Van Dyken-Rouen’s X video about this, she says if the officials are going to DQ based on this technicality, then they should have also DQ’ed backstrokers who entered the water by diving in because, as she says, “The rule states backstrokers must enter feet first.” I do not see this rule in the NCAA swimming & diving rule book. Is that an actual rule in NCAA swimming? Thanks!

Admin
Reply to  BGray
1 month ago

As far as I can tell it is not in the rule book anywhere.

This is what the rule book says: “In backstroke and medley relay events, at the referee’s first long whistle, the swimmers shall immediately enter the water and at the second long whistle shall return without undue delay to the starting position.”

BGray
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

Thanks, that is what I saw too, and nothing about entering feet first. The point being, the commentators, while they know more about swimming and the rules than most people, do not necessarily know the rules of this organization or that organization. Thus, one should not necessarily assume the commentators’ statements are correct and base opinions on them without checking the rules.

Frank Leavitt
1 month ago

Pretty sure not one competitor in that final, is happy about this DQ. There was no interference with another swimmer.

Matt
1 month ago

The fault here lies not with the swimmer but the coach. Anyone who is winning like that deserves to win but the coach knew the rule. It’s the coach’s responsibility to convey that rule to the competitor. If the competitor knew the rule and violated it anyway, this is what happens. If not, it’s the coach’s responsibility. “Listen up, team. If you win up there, don’t move from your lane until the official results are announced. This is important. It could cost you an important win. Stay put.” or something to that effect. As a practical matter, I understand the rule if the other swimmer had not finished and he jumped in his lane and prevented the opposing swimmer from… Read more »

Ron
1 month ago

Dear swimmers, let’s make swimming a thing.
Celebrate legally as wild as you can!
Do it for you, do it for Owen, do it for the sport!!!

Breezeway
1 month ago

Just watched a 60 meter sprinter at the World Indoor Championships take multiple steps in the other lane during the prelims. The runner in that lane was at least 5 meters behind. NO DQ, the runner was not interfered with.

The officials used common sense and moved on.

Steve Nolan
Reply to  Breezeway
1 month ago

Hell if anything they could’ve caught a draft. DQ the runner behind.

BGray
Reply to  Breezeway
1 month ago

Their rules might be totally different than NCAA swimming & diving rules.

Breezeway
Reply to  BGray
1 month ago

Yeah, they’re modern and better

Tigerswim22
1 month ago

Officials should always use some common sense when making decisions that affect athletes and outcomes. This rule was conceived to insure that a swimmer not INTERFERE with another swimmers ability to finish their race. It’s clear who won this race. It’s obvious the winner didn’t interfere with the runner up swimmers ability to finish their race (nor that of anyone else). The two team-mates actually celebrated together as the official made her fateful decision to DQ the winner. Without true interference having taken place, common sense should have dictated a different decision. No harm, no foul. Be fair. Protect all of the competitors. Who wants to be given a gold medal that wasn’t earned fair and square? Bad call.

About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

Coleman started his journey in the water at age 1, and although he actually has no memory of that, something must have stuck. A Missouri native, he joined the Columbia Swim Club at age 9, where he is still remembered for his stylish dragon swim trunks. After giving up on …

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