Nick Carlson Becomes 3rd Transfer from Indiana to Arizona State

Nick Carlson, originally from Austin, Texas, will be the third former Hoosier on the Arizona State University men’s swimming and diving team roster next fall. He follows Jack Kucharczyk and Jackson Etter who also announced their decision to move from Bloomington to Tempe.

“I chose ASU because I truly believe that the coaching staff and my future teammates will help get me to the places I want to go. ASU really feels like home to me and I can’t wait to see what’s in store for the future!”

Carlson has completed two years at Indiana University and will enter ASU as a junior. As a freshman, he clocked PBs in the 50 free (21.12), 100 free (44.72), 200 free (1:37.53) and 500 free (4:27.70) at the First Chance Meet just before the 2016 B1G Championships. The following season he improved his 200 free time at the Purdue Invite and finished the year earning Academic All-Big Ten honors.

This spring, Carlson dropped time in the 200 free and 500 free and kicked off the 2018 long course season with new PBs in the 100/200/400 free.

Short Course:

  • 100 free – 44.72
  • 100 free relay – 43.92
  • 200 free – 1:36.47
  • 500 free – 4:23.88

Long Course:

  • 100 free – 51.06
  • 200 free – 1:51.02
  • 400 free – 4:00.36

Carlson, Kucharczyk and Etter will begin the Arizona State phase of their collegiate career with incoming freshmen Cody Bybee, Cole Kilburn, Eddie Michael, Elijah Warren, Ethan Luc, Jack Edgemond, Jack Little, Jakob Icimsoy, Khalil Fonder, Liam Bresette, Noah Desman, and Noah Henry, and transfers Gage Kohner (Northwestern) and Carter Swift (Eastern Michigan).

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bh4XFCkHlnY/?hl=en&taken-by=nick__carlson

If you have a commitment to report, please send an email with a photo (landscape, or horizontal, looks best) and a quote to [email protected].

 SwimSwam Transfer Tracker

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marklewis
4 years ago

Often it works out well for a swimmer to transfer to a program that where he can get what he needs to succeed.

If you don’t like the coach (his personality, the way he interacts with you) then look for another program or retire from swimming.

Too bad for Indiana that they are taking a ruthless approach to their “talent.” Swim Swam is putting out headlines on all the fleeing swimmers.

Cadillac
Reply to  marklewis
4 years ago

Yep. Per usual, I think it’s appropriate for swimswam to update its readers on the latest transfers around the ncaa. Unfortunate for IU and fair to all outsiders, there will continue to be much attention drawn to the program as more of these transfers are revealed.

Stats 4
Reply to  marklewis
4 years ago

Yeah. The problem is IU is getting rid of people who still have a passion for swimming and are improving, including people with high GPAs and those active in team leadership. Especially rough on swimmers who are far along in their degree programs, because transferring would likely mean an extra year (or more) to finish school.

Admin
Reply to  Stats 4
4 years ago

Sketchy/Stats 4 – please adhere to SwimSwam commenting policies about not using multiple user names in the same comment thread. Thank you.

Kelsey
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

I think he has that’s why he has kept his last few posts as stats 4.

Coach MM
4 years ago

All 3 transfers were not fast enough for a team that will likely be the favorite for NCAAs next year. They needed to make room for: Zach Apple, the brazilian stars and the Olympic level divers. They want to be the best. Nothing wrong with that.

Marge
Reply to  Coach MM
4 years ago

Well said. If you want a participatory program don’t choose to attend a Top 25 team. There are standards, and if you do not meet those standards, you may not stay on the team. That could be for any number of reasons: swimming times, missing practice, not making good grades, poor choices outside of the pool, etc.

IU is getting picked on, but this happens on the Texas men’s team, and at other programs. People get cut all the time. Wisconsin was the only program I knew of where coaches could not cut an athlete. College swimming at the elite level is simply not for everyone.

Marmot
Reply to  Marge
4 years ago

Pardon me, I was not under the impression that these student athletes were getting paid. That’s the only way to “cut” an athlete, correct? They are students first, athletes second.

“Well said?” You’d do well with a severe reality check, as your ideals are way out of line.

Stats 4
Reply to  Marge
4 years ago

There’s a problem, though, when the coaches are cherry picking who they would like to get rid of. If it were about these “standards,” those below a certain GPA and time threshold should be cut. That, to some degree, would make sense, if those standards were clearly stated from the start. That’s why IU is taking (rightfully so) some heat for this.

Admin
Reply to  Stats 4
4 years ago

Sketchy/Stats 4 – please adhere to SwimSwam commenting policies about not using multiple user names in the same comment thread. Thank you.

JeahBrah
Reply to  Marge
4 years ago

Can you give examples as to who the Texas men’s team has cut, since you called them out?

Interesting stats
4 years ago

Phillip butler, Teddy Kalp, Luke Lete, Jonathan Panchak, Jack Wallar, Marijn Zundert, Brandon Colonis, Ryan Gordon, Andre Ivanovic, Timothy Martin, Cody Taylor, Nick Wonder, Evan Burke, Trey Shackleton, Joseph Lane, Matt Anderson, Jack Collins, Wes Duke, Nolan Plant, Brian valedon, Jackson Etter, Jack Kucharczyk, Nick Carlson. These are the people I have found while looking over the last 4 years on the roster, and through recent Swimswam articles, who did not complete their time at IU. It is more than likely that there are many more people that are a part of this list. Do what you want with this list, but it is surely more turnover than the average team.

Stats part 2
Reply to  Interesting stats
4 years ago

Missing quite a few-
Alex Vissering, Jared Fitzgerald, Nikola Andjelic, Kyle Morris, Chris Quarin, and many more to come.

dmswim
Reply to  Interesting stats
4 years ago

Indiana has more Jacks leaving their team than most teams have people leaving.

Stats 3
Reply to  Interesting stats
4 years ago

You also forgot Chris Russo, Michael Shaban, and Andrew Kvachkoff

Acokeandasmile
Reply to  Stats 3
4 years ago

Tucker

Stats 4
Reply to  Interesting stats
4 years ago

Steve Husch and James Hammond, too. And this is just men, many others on women’s side.

Admin
Reply to  Stats 4
4 years ago

Sketchy/Stats 4 – please adhere to SwimSwam commenting policies about not using multiple user names in the same comment thread. Thank you.

Admin
Reply to  Interesting stats
4 years ago

There’s actually a real answer to this! While the Swimulator hasn’t been updated to account for this offseason yet, it does have a ranking for “attrition rates.” Indiana men rank 121st out of 158 D1 teams in that category:

https://swimswam.com/swimulator/?type=programs&gender=Men&division=D1&conference=All

They also scored significantly more points at last year’s NCAA Championship meet than any team below them. Without doing the math, they probably outscored the combination of all of the teams below them.

Wowjustwow
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

No way that rate is right!

CollegeSwimmer
Reply to  Interesting stats
4 years ago

And that’s only the males. There’s many more if you look at the female side as well

Not Philip Butler
Reply to  Interesting stats
4 years ago

Philip Butler is spelled with 1 “L”. He also held a world record. If I recall he split about a 16.5 on that relay too. Cody Miller really drug down the team. Phil’s nickname was “night train”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_record_progression_4_%C3%97_50_metres_freestyle_relay

Joe
4 years ago

Wonder how much of this exodus was Looze clearing out scholarships for Zach Apple once he heard that Hawke was out at Auburn. The Instagram post above could imply that the scholarship was cut a month ago, about when Hawke resigned. Totally speculative, I know

Swimmer1
Reply to  Joe
4 years ago

Doubt any of these guys were on money.

Coacheycoach
Reply to  Swimmer1
4 years ago

Not all are listed!

swimcoach
4 years ago

We had an OT qualifier in multiple events attend IU as well. Went into college highly motivated, extremely talented with immense feel for the water. Left after his sophomore year emotionally broken due to the coaching staff. Never was the same swimmer after that.

They’re obviously doing big things with some of their swimmers. Shape up or ship out seems to be the ideology and its possible when all of your recruiting classes have 10-15 plus in them. Good for the program, not that great for the swimmers they kick to the side.

Swimmer A
Reply to  swimcoach
4 years ago

It’s really interesting to get the scoop on the culture of these programs. It’s something you cannot get from an article. All I see is the success of IU recently and I kind of just assume it must be a great place to swim. But judging by these comments, it’s not a great place for everyone to swim.

45 points at NC's
4 years ago

I can’t wait to see how well they do under the “amazing coaching staff of ASU”

Alex
4 years ago

I have known the ASU swimming program for 18 years. Bob Bowman, along with great support by Ray Anderson, vice president for university athletics, have given the program a new vigor and emphasis that has not been present before. In addition, the swimmers receive great support in their endeavors, both academically and as swimmers!

Superfan
Reply to  Alex
4 years ago

And big buck$$$$

Kathy
4 years ago

Pro groups take A LOT of time from coaches. This time has to come from somewhere. Usually it’s the small fish on the team that suffer. Being able to coach pros along with a full college team is a skill set very few coaches (staffs) have. Durden keeps his team very small. Eddie keeps his pro group very small. Georgia and Florida have very deep and experienced staffs. Nobody else does it very well.

Tammy Touchpad Error
Reply to  Kathy
4 years ago

IU?? NCS bout to have a big one. SC?

About Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant is the mother of four daughters, all of whom swam in college. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton (where she was an all-Ivy tennis player) and an MBA from INSEAD, she worked for many years in the financial industry, both in France and the U.S. Anne is currently …

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