Caeleb Dressel Lowers NAG Record; Ties Seventh Fastest Swim In History

Caeleb Dressel is now the second fastest American performer in history. The Florida freshman won the 50 freestyle at the 2015 Men’s NCAA DI Swimming and Diving Championships with his time of 18.67, lowering his 17-18 NAG record from this morning. That time will also stand as the new Florida school record as well.

Earlier this morning he broke his own NAG record with a 18.86 lead off in the prelims of the 200 freestyle relay. He went that same exact time during his individual 50 freestyle preliminary swim to qualify first going into finals. Tonight, the national age group record takes a big jump from 18.86 to 18.67.

Dressel received a lot of heat after making the decision to swim for Florida, but it appears to have paid off. His former club coach, Jason Canalog, told us he put on 25 pounds of muscle over the last year.

His time from finals will stand as tied for the seventh fastest swim in history. Nathan Adrian currently holds the American Record with his time of 18.66.

Top 10 All Time Performances:

1. 18.47 – Cesar Cielo – 2008
T2. 18.52 – Cesar Cielo 2008
T2. 18.52 – Matt Targett – 2009
4. 18.63 – Vlad Morozov – 2013
5. 18.64 – Kristian Gkolomeev – 2015
6. 18.66 – Nathan Adrian – 2008
T7. 18.67 – Nathan Adrian – 2011
T7 18.67 – Fred Bosquet – 2010
T7. 1867 – Caeleb Dressel – 2015
T10. 18.69 – Cesar Cielo – 2007
T10. 18.69 – Kristian Gkolomeev – 2015

Top 5 American Performances:

1. 18.66 – Nathan Adrian – 2008
T2. 18.67 – Nathan Adrian – 2011
T2. 1867 – Caeleb Dressel – 2015
4.  18.82 – Alex Righi – 2009
5. 18.84 – Jimmy Feigen – 2009

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Paul

With Dressel taking the NAG record so close to the American record, it begs the question: Has the American record also been a NAG record? I know off the top of my head that Phelps probably did it in long course when he was breaking world records as a 16-year-old, but has anyone done it in short course? Has anyone besides Phelps pulled this off?

Swimmer823

katie ledecky…..

trossie

girls distance is a lot a lot different than guys sprin

ir

Ledecky

Ben

it has happened lots of times. Rarer now but still happens as you can see.

iLikePsych

And Missy Franklin. And Simone Manuel. And probably Amanda Beird.

I believe Kevin Cordes was 18 when he set the American record of 51.32 at NCAA’s his freshman year, but it doesn’t show up as a NAG for some reason.

Did Jeff Kostoff set the American record when he went 4:13?

I’m not sure Cordes was registered as a USA swimmer at the time.

ArtVanDeLegh10

If you’re talking about when Kostoff broke the HS National record he was 4:16. I’m not sure if that was the fastest swim at the time though. I wouldn’t be surprise if it was. I think it was done in 1983. I doubt too many people were 4:16 in 1983.

bigNowhere

Kostoff’s 4:16 was the American record at the time. (I just posted this below before I saw this comment)

Dan

Aaron Peirsol broke the 200 back world record when he was still in high school.

bigNowhere

Back in 1983, high schooler Jeff Kostoff set the American record in the 500 free at 4:16. That stood as the high school 500 free record until Conger broke it in 2013. Its tenure as the American record was, of course much shorter than that.

Drew

Bolles!

Chipper

No way he gained 25 lbs. It would help in the long run but that’s a lot of weight to gain so quickly. The body takes time to adjust, seems unlikely for him to have done so well so fast

swimmer1995

Well believe it, because the results are right in front of you. Unlikely is out of the equation. He’s the real deal.

iLikePsych

Plenty of people gain 25 lbs their freshmen years….

bigNowhere

I’ll bet he gained the 25 pounds during his 5 months off.

About Tony Carroll

Tony Carroll

The writer formerly known as "Troy Gennaro", better known as Tony Carroll, has been working with SwimSwam since April of 2013. Tony grew up in northern Indiana and started swimming in 2003 when his dad forced him to join the local swim team. Reluctantly, he joined on the condition that …

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