2022 European Championships: Day 7 Prelims Live Recap

2022 EUROPEAN AQUATICS CHAMPIONSHIPS

DAY 7 PRELIMS HEAT SHEET

Day 7 Prelims Event Schedule:

  • Women’s 400 Freestyle
  • Men’s 400 Freestyle
  • Women’s 4×100 Medley Relay
  • Men’s 4×100 Medley Relay

The final prelims session is the shortest session of the meet, featuring only the women’s 400 free and men’s 400 free individually. There are 4 heats of the women’s 400 and 5 of the men’s. Following the 400 freestyles, there will be heats of the 4×100 medley relays as well.

Italian star Simona Quadarella is going to be attempting to complete her sweep of the women’s distance events at these Championships. Quadarella has already won the 800 and 1500, defending her titles from last year in both. The 400 will be her toughest challenge of the meet, as it’s her weakest of the distance events and Germany’s Isabel Gose has swum well this week.

Goes enters as the top seed, coming in at 4:03.21 to Quadarella’s 4:04.66. Gose swam a 4:03.47 at the World Championships in June, taking 5th in finals.

Don’t blink because Romanian superstar David Popovici is in the first heat of the men’s 400 free this morning. Popovici should dominate that heat, and after breaking the World Record in the 100 free and swimming the fastest textile time in the 200 free already at these Championships, he may have something special in store for us in the 400.

Popovici isn’t the only junior to keep your eyes on in the 400 today, as 16-year-old Italian Lorenzo Galossi is seeded 8th in the event. Galossi won Bronze in the 800 free earlier in the meet, breaking the WJR. That means Popovici and Galossi have combined to break the 100 free, 200 free, and 800 free World Junior Records this week.

Outside of the juniors, German Lukas Martens is the top seed, coming in at a sizzling 3:41.60. He comes in well ahead of #2 seed Felix Auboeck, who is seeded at 3:43.58. Italy has been swimming well at these Championships, and outside of Galossi, Gabriele Detti and Marco De Tullio are live to make the final as well. Matteo Ciampi could make some noise too, but we have to keep in mind that only 2 swimmers per country are permitted to advance beyond prelims in an event.

1500 champion Mykhailo Romanchuk is seeded way back at #19 and shouldn’t have an issue advancing to finals, especially since he led prelims in both the 800 and 1500 free at this meet.

WOMEN’S 400 FREESTYLE

  • World Record: 3:56.40 – Ariarne Titmus, AUS (2022)
  • European Record: 3:59.15 – Federica Pellegrini, ITA (2009)
  • European Championships Record: 4:01.53 – Federica Pellegrini, ITA (2008)
  • 2020 European Champion: Simona Quadarella, ITA – 4:04.66

Top 8 Qualifiers:

  1. Isabel Gose (GER) – 4:06.10
  2. Simona Quadarella (ITA) – 4:08.80
  3. Bettina Fabian (HUN) – 4:10.46
  4. Katja Fain (SLO) – 4:10.67
  5. Julia Mrozinski (GER) – 4:11.03
  6. Valentine Dumont (BEL) – 4:11.27
  7. Ajna Kesely (HUN) – 4:11.81
  8. Antonietta Cesarano (ITA) – 4:12.35

There were a number of no-swims in the women’s 400 free prelims this morning. The final heat alone saw 3 swimmers scratch the race, including Great Britain’s Freya Anderson, Poland’s Aleksandra Knop, and Great Britain’s Tamryn Van Selm. Italy’s Martina Caramignoli also pulled out of the race.

Germany’s Isabel Gose was completely in control in the final heat this morning, pulling away from the field immediately and establishing a massive lead. She looked comfortable as she sped to the fastest time of the morning by nearly 3 seconds. Of course, everyone is waiting to see the showdown between Gose and Italy’s Simona Quadarella in tonight’s final.

Quadarella swam a comfortable looking 4:08.80 this morning, looking smooth and in control in her own right. Having already won the women’s 800 and 1500 at these Championships, Quadarella is looking to sweep the women’s distance events with a 400 Gold tonight.

Hungary’s Bettina Fabian had a nice swim this morning, taking 3rd overall in 4:10.46.

MEN’S 400 FREE:

  • World Record: 3:40.07 — Paul Biedermann, Germany (2009)
  • European Record: 3:40.07 — Paul Biedermann, Germany (2009)
  • European Championships Record: 3:44.01 — Gabriele Detti, Italy (2016)
  • 2020 European Champion: Martin Malyutin, Russia — 3:44.18

Top 8 Qualifiers:

  1. Henning Muehlleitner (GER) – 3:46.79
  2. Lukas Martens (GER) – 3:47.38
  3. Antonio Djakovic (SUI) – 3:47.38
  4. David Popovici (ROU) – 3:47.99
  5. Lorenzo Galossi  (ITA) – 3:48.15
  6. Gabriele Detti (ITA) – 3:48.32
  7. Marco De Tullio (ITA) – 3:48.38 (X – country limit)
  8. Joris Bouchaut (FRA) – 3:49.00
  9. Felix Auboeck (AUT) – 3:49.16

We didn’t know what to expect from Romanian 17-year-old David Popovici in this 400 free, but we should have known he wouldn’t have an issue advancing to finals. Swimming out of the first heat without an entry time, Popovici took the race out under European Record pace on the first 100, then settled into a milder pace for the rest of his swim. He tore to a 3:47.99, winning heat 1 by nearly 12 seconds and finishing 4th overall.

In a tremendous closing effort in heat 4, Italian 16-year-old Lorenzo Galossi split a blistering 26.85 on the final 50 to get into the finish first at 3:48.15. It was a solid morning swim for Galossi, coming in just over 2 seconds off his personal best of 3:45.93. Fellow Italian Marco De Tullio was right behind Galossi at the finish, swimming a 3:48.38. Gabriele Detti would come in at 3:48.32 in the final heat, beating out De Tullio by 0.06 seconds and taking Italy’s 2nd spot for finals.

#2 seed Felix Auboeck was 4th in heat 4, swimming a 3:49.16. Thanks to De Tullio getting bumped out by his Italian teammate, Auboeck made it into tonight’s final with the 8th slot.

After winning the men’s 1500 last night in a massive performance, Ukraine’s Mykhailo Romanchuk scratched the 400 free this morning, removing a serious threat to the rest of the field.

The final heat was the fastest, seeing the German duo of Henning Muehlleitner and Lukas Martens pull away from the field at the end of the race. They would also clock the top 2 times of the morning, coming in at 3:46.79 and 3:47.38 respectively. Switzerland’s Antonio Djakovic was the early leader, but ended up 3rd in the heat, still safely qualifying for finals.

WOMEN’S 4X100 MEDLEY RELAY

  • World Record: 3:50.40, United States – 2019 World Championships
  • European Record: 3:53.38, Russia – 2017 World Championships
  • European Championship Record: 3:54.01, Great Britain – 2021
  • 2020 European Champion: Great Britain, 3:54.01

Top 8 Qualifiers:

  1. Sweden – 3:59.19
  2. Italy – 4:00.58
  3. Netherlands – 4:01.59
  4. Great Britain – 4:03.21
  5. France – 4:03.59
  6. Poland – 4:04.86
  7. Switzerland – 4:05.28
  8. Germany – 4:05.41

Sweden took the 1st heat of the women’s 4×100 medley relay this morning, dipping under 4:00 in the process. Hanna Rosvall led the team off in 1:01.10, and was followed by Sophie Hansson in 1:07.11 on breaststroke, Louise Hansson in 56.97 on fly, and Sarah Sjostrom in 54.01 on the anchor leg. We know that relay has a little left to give tonight. It’s unclear whether Rosvall will remain on backstroke, but at the least, we know both Sophie Hansson and Sarah Sjostrom can be significantly faster on their respective legs.

French anchor Beryl Gastaldello had a notable split, throwing down a 53.63 to lead all freestylers in the heat. Great Britain’s Anna Hopkin would come and slightly outdo her in the 2nd heat, splitting 53.54 to bring her team home.

Netherlands broke away from the field on breaststroke and won the 2nd heat comfortably, posting a 4:01.59 to win the heat.

MEN’S 4X100 MEDLEY RELAY

  • World Record: 3:26.78, United States – 2021 Olympic Games
  • European Record: 3:27.51, Great Britain / Italy – 2021 Olympic Games / 2022 World Championships
  • European Championship Record: 3:28.59, Great Britain – 2021
  • 2020 European Champion: Great Britain, 3:28.59

Top 8 Qualifiers:

  1. Italy – 3:34.35
  2. Austria – 3:34.82
  3. Great Britain – 3:35.45
  4. France – 3:35.46
  5. Poland – 3:36.04
  6. Ukraine – 3:36.69
  7. Germany – 3:36.95
  8. Spain – 3:37.09

Italy has been performing exceptionally well throughout these Championships and they’re looking to finish out the meet on a high note as well. The Italian squad of Michele Lamberti (54.95), Federico Poggio (59.70), Federico Burdisso (51.37), and Manuel Frigo (48.33) teamed up for a 3:34.35 this morning, holding off France, who finished 2nd in the heat in 3:35.46.

We know Italy can be a lot faster tonight, and they may change out their entire relay for finals as well. The only swimmer who could potentially stay on the relay for tonight is flyer Federico Burdisso, but even that is far from a guarantee. The Italians will be adding 100 back World Record holder Thomas Ceccon in tonight, as well as 50 and 100 breast Gold medalist Nicolo Martinenghi and Italian Record holder in the 100 free Alessandro Miressi.

Austria put up a great performance in the 2nd heat this morning, tearing to a 3:34.82 to finish just of Italy’s time. They were helped by a strong back half, featuring a 51.85 fly split from Simon Bucher and a 48.23 anchor from Heiko Gigler. Valentin Bayer’s 59.43 breaststroke split was a big help as well.

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John26
1 month ago

Aight, so who are we saying Popovici is ducking? Galossi?

Jk, I wouldn’t dare 🙂

Last edited 1 month ago by John26
fred
1 month ago

Also Wellbrock won’t race in open water

Alison England
Reply to  fred
1 month ago

He’s not properly recovered from Covid.

fred
1 month ago

Popovici scratched the 400 he’s not on the startlist for the final

Go Kamminga Go
Reply to  fred
1 month ago

So he swam just for time

Alison England
Reply to  fred
1 month ago

Perhaps it was preparation for swimming it at WJs?

Plun
Reply to  Alison England
1 month ago

World Juniors he has no competition. To beat Biedermann he must resume training

Alison England
Reply to  Plun
1 month ago

Is Galossi doing WJs?

Admin
Reply to  Alison England
1 month ago

I don’t think a final decision has been made. @Giusy says it’s a “maybe” for now.

Troyy
Reply to  fred
1 month ago

You just know the other 400 guys are relieved.

Alexandru
Reply to  fred
1 month ago
Last edited 1 month ago by Alexandru
Axelswim
Reply to  Alexandru
1 month ago

It’s up to them, although he did not have that tight of a schedule (especially in comparison with Milak’s) to scratch a final swim. He might have won another medal.

Alison England
Reply to  Axelswim
1 month ago

He will have a heavy load at WJs!

Fan
Reply to  Alison England
1 month ago

Yes he will! Most likely 50/100/200 and several relays

Plun
Reply to  Fan
1 month ago

He can Beat Biedermann in the 400 tonight!

Plun
Reply to  Alexandru
1 month ago

Why bother with World JRs at his level

Fan
Reply to  Plun
1 month ago

David said recently that he is the leader of the Romanian swim team. He is crucial to his team making the medal stand in the relays. Also it’s his last competition as a JR so maybe try to take down the two JR WR he doesn’t own, the 50 and the 400…but just guessing

Plun
Reply to  fred
1 month ago

That makes no sense he can Bear Biedermann tonight

Clutch
1 month ago

Austria has a pretty good chance to win silver in the medley relay this evening.

Alexandru
1 month ago

I feel like he struggles to pace it, cause he doesn’t swim 400 usually…
His strategy for gold should be to not get behind in the first 300-350m and then empty the tank in the last 50m…
Easy to say this in a comment on swimswam, but I think he can deliver

Go Kamminga Go
Reply to  Alexandru
1 month ago

Reportedly he won’t swim final

Plun
Reply to  Go Kamminga Go
1 month ago

It makes no sense he can beat Biedermann

Clutch
1 month ago

I don’t know what to expect this evening from Popovici. Before I definitely would have put my money on a 3:42. This guy swam 1:46 and 3:48 in April and dropped 4 seconds in the 200 free, so not crazy to assume he would drop even more in the 400 free.
While his swim this morning looked easy, I did not look that easy. I mean not like “I’m gonna swim 3:42” easy. He seemed to be a tired.

I think right I would put my money on a 3:44, maybe 3:43.

Mako
Reply to  Clutch
1 month ago

Makes you really appreciate what a talent Thorpe was, doesn’t it?

Dion
Reply to  Mako
1 month ago

They are different swimmers. Ian Thorpe didn’t really do 100m at the beginning of his career while this is the first 400m race for David. Maybe we will see a bit more about it in Lima, maybe not.. he might go for the 50m instead. All at it’s time.

Last edited 1 month ago by Dion
David
1 month ago

Imagine he wins it as unseeded with no entry time

BearlyBreathing
1 month ago

My finals prediction for the skinny legend: 3:43.5