WATCH: Andrew Seliskar Pops 1:38.1 in 200 IM

2019 MEN’S NCAA SWIMMING & DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Originally reported by Lauren Neidigh

This morning in prelims at the 2019 Men’s NCAA Championships in Austin, Texas, Cal senior Andrew Seliskar became the 5th man ever to break 1:40 in the 200 IM. He blew that away tonight, becoming the 2nd man to break 1:39 as he won his first individual NCAA title in 1:38.14. That broke his own Pool Record of 1:39.90 from prelims and the Championship Record of 1:39.38 done by David Nolan back in 2014.

Seliskar’s splits (finals/prelims):

  • Fly- 21.58/21.87
  • Back- 24.46/24.83
  • Breast- 28.05/28.52
  • Free- 24.05/24.68
  • Final Time- 1:38.14/1:39.90

Seliskar’s time was just a hundredth shy of the American Record, which stands at a 1:38.13 done by Florida’s Caeleb Dressel at the 2018 SEC Championships. Throughout today, he’s now dropped almost 2.5 seconds in his 200 IM. The back half was where Seliskar really took control. Through the backstroke leg, NC State’s Andreas Vazaios was the leader, but Seliskar took over on the breaststroke leg with a 28.05. He moved nearly a second ahead of Vazaios on the closing freestyle split alone.

Vazaios wound up 2nd in a lifetime best 1:39.35 to become the 3rd fastest performer ever. Texas’ John Shebat became the 6th man ever to break 1:40 as he took 3rd in 1:39.63. That makes Shebat #6 all-time.

ALL TIME TOP 10 PERFORMERS – MEN’S 200 IM

PLACE SWIMMER TIME
1 Caeleb Dressel 1:38.13
2 Andrew Seliskar 1:38.14
3 Andreas Vazaios 1:39.35
4 David Nolan 1:39.38
5 Jan Switkowski 1:39.54
6 John Shebat 1:39.63
7 Will Licon 1:40.04
8 Ryan Lochte 1:40.08
9 Josh Prenot 1:40.14
10 Vini Lanza 1:40.23

ALL TIME TOP 10 PERFORMANCES – MEN’S 200 IM

PLACE SWIMMER TIME
1 Caeleb Dressel 1:38.13
2 Andrew Seliskar 1:38.14
3 Andreas Vazaios 1:39.35
4 David Nolan 1:39.38
5 Jan Switkowski 1:39.54
6 John Shebat 1:39.63
7 Andrew Seliskar 1:39.90
8 Andreas Vazaios 1:39.97
9 Will Licon 1:40.04
10 David Nolan 1:40.07
10 Ryan Lochte 1:40.08

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Richard
3 years ago

Split comparison with dressel pls

fluidg
3 years ago

Good video, but why to people film the clock instead of the swimmer reaction? The time will be there forever. The reaction is fleeting. Can you imagine the meet photographers doing that?

iLikePsych
3 years ago

Random, but is Vazaios’s back split of 23.79 the fastest ever? I think the previous fastest was Lochte at 24.0. I don’t Nolan or Murphy ever broke 24 either.

Seliskar’s 28.0/24.0 could put him at or close to the fastest back half ever. I think only Licon has broken 28 on breast, and Dressel and Cameron Craig 24 on free

EDIT:
Dressel and Seliskar were both exactly 46.04 at the 100, which means…Dressel beat him on the back half by .01.
Dressel: 21.03 – 25.01 – 28.37 – 23.72
Seliksar: 21.58 – 24.46 – 28.05 – 24.05

Licon was 27.84 and 24.30 in 2016, which puts him .05 behind Caeleb and .04 behind Seliskar

Jabroni Pepperoni
Reply to  iLikePsych
3 years ago

Finnerty broke 28 at Big 10’s this year

SeaMonster
Reply to  iLikePsych
3 years ago

Paul DeLakis broke 24 at prelims of big tens and Drew Loy broke 24 at finals on the free leg

Gator
Reply to  iLikePsych
3 years ago

Amazing that Seliskar won but also that that 2nd and third also went <1:40. Fastest 2IM race ever

Oldbay
3 years ago

That breaststroke bodes really well for the 200 Breast, could challenge Licon’s record

Swammer
3 years ago

That breaststroke gottem.

WOWNICEDUDE!!!
3 years ago

We all know Dressel would have gone 1:36.9 at NCAAs if he swam it so let’s just calm down.

Mr Piano
Reply to  WOWNICEDUDE!!!
3 years ago

Until you faster than 1:38 I suggest you calm down

mcmflyguy
Reply to  Mr Piano
3 years ago

can’t we just all calm down (in my best lebowski voice)

About Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro started swimming at age 11, instantly becoming drawn to the sport. He was a breaststroker and IMer when competing. After joining SwimSwam, the site has become an outlet for him to research and learn about competitive swimming and experience the sport through a new lenses. He graduated in …

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