Vladislav Grinev Dethrones KingKyle; Breaks Russian Record in 100 Free

2019 RUSSIAN SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

After swimming a 47.56 anchor split on Moscow’s 400 free relay on Monday, Vladislav Grinev went even faster – on a flat start – during Tuesday’s individual 100 free semi-final.

The 22-year old posted the top qualifying time in 47.43, which broke the old Russian Record of 47.59 done in 2009 by Andrey Grechin when he was only 21. That reduces Russia to 19 remaining national senior records from the polyurethane suit eras of 2008 and 2009, which is still more than most nations.

Grechin’s old record-breaking swim was done in the same pool in Moscow also at a semi-final at the Russian Championships. He was slower, but still won, the final in 47.98.

Comparative Splits:

  • Grechin ’09 = 23.14/24.45 = 47.59
  • Grinev ’19 = 22.76/24.67 = 47.43

Grinev was out much faster than Grechin’s record-breaking swim was, though Grechin closed very well – as was a trademark during the supersuit era. Outside of that era, he wasn’t generally as good of a closer.

Grinev’s previous best time was a 48.36 from last summer’s European Championships where he placed 4th. Before the 2018 season, he had only been 49.55.

He now ranks 11th all-time in the event (performers), and bumps Kyle Chalmers’ 47.48 from Aussie Nationals earlier this week as the world’s best time so far this season.

Evgeny Rylov was the 2nd qualifier in 48.56 and Vlad Morozov was 3rd in 48.58. Kliment Kolesnikov qualified 4th in 48.64.

Grinev’s was one of two Russian Records broken on the 2nd day of competition. The other came early in the session when Veronika Andrusenko (formerly Popova) swam a 4:06.01 in the women’s 400 free final. That slid under Anna Egorova’s record of 4:06.03 done at last summer’s European Championships. Egorova was 2nd in the race in 4:06.79, which is under the selection standard for Worlds.

Andrusenko’s previous best was a 4:06.40 done at the 2017 World Championships. This record-breaking swim came in the same session as the 100 free final, almost 2 hours earlier, where Andrusenko was just 54.89 for 2nd place – almost a full second slower than her lifetime best.

In the highest-profile final of the night, the men’s 100 backstroke, Evgeny Rylov came away as champion of a very crowded group. In spite of the presence of Kliment Kolesnikov and Grigory Tarasevich, Rylov is emerging as the superstar of that Russian backstroke group: this marks the 5th-straight season in which he’s won the Russian long course title in the event. His best event, the 200 back, is still to come at the meet.

Kolesnikov was 2nd to grab the other World Championship spot in 53.03, while Tarasevich was 3rd in 53.29.

The other highlight of the day came in the men’s 200 breaststroke. There, Anton Chupkov led 4 Russian men under the qualifying standard in the with a 2:07.00. While it’s 2-tenths of a second short of his European Record, it goes down as the 3rd-best performance of all time.

Top 5 Performances in History, Men’s 200 LCM Breaststroke:

  1. Ippei Watanabe, Japan, 2017 – 2:06.67
  2. Anton Chupkov, Russia, 2018 – 2:06.80
  3. Anton Chupkov, Russia, 2019 – 2:07.00
  4. Akihiro Yamaguchi, Japan, 2012 – 2:07.01
  5. Ippei Watanabe, Japan, 2019 – 2:07.02

Chupkov will be joined on the roster in this event by a relative-unknown: Alexander Palatov. He took 2nd in 2:08.70. His previous best time in the event was a 2:10.45 done in 2016. The 23-year old didn’t race for over a year from 2017 through November of 2018, but dropped almost 2 seconds in his first long course meet in 19 months. Ilya Khomenko took 3rd in 2:08.72, while defending World Short Course Champion Kiril Prigoda was locked out in 4th in 2:09.05.

Other Day 2 Winners:

  • Svetlana Chimrova, the Russian Record holder in the event, won the women’s 200 fly running-away in 2:10.44. She was 3.1 seconds short of her best time, though, and 2 away from the World Championship selection standard. She’ll have to rely on the coach’s discretion clause if she were to swim this race in Gwangju this summer.
  • The women’s 200 back final had two swimmers under the standard for Gwangju (though neither was marked as such in the results – and we’re not sure why). Teenager Anastasia Avdeeva won the race in 2:09.89 and Daria K. Ustinova was 2nd in 2:10.30. The listed qualifying standard is 2:10.39.
  • Maria Kameneva won the women’s 100 free in 53.80 – just two-tenths of a second from her Russian Record. As mentioned, Andrusenko took 2nd in 54.89 – which misses the Russian selection standard by half-a-second.
  • Ilya Druzhinin went sub-15 for the first time since the Rio Olympics in the timed final of the men’s mile and won in 14:59.86. He was the only swimmer under the selection standard and was 12 seconds ahead of the field.

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nuotofan

Such a Grinev (47.7 in the heats, 47.4 in the semi) is a massive asset for Russian 400 free relay.
I’m sure that the two “backstrokers” Rylov and Kolesnikov, two great swimmers, will be excellent also in the 400 free relay (not counting youngsters like Girev and Minakov), so all depends on Morozov.
Morozov was capable to swim incredible splits (under 47″) and in this case it would be game over for the other nations.

John26

Literally have never heard of this guy

bear drinks beer

He’s been there for a while for Russian relays. I remember he dropped a 47-something split in the mixed relay at last year’s Euros. Yet still a huge breakout for him here.

nuotofan

In 2018 he was fourth both at EuroChamps LCM (48.36) and at Worlds SCM (45.92), 3 tenths behind the winners (Miressi and Dressel respectively).
Great technique for this swimmer, unknown at high levels until 2018.

Rafael

Chupkov has 2 sub 2:07 200 breast if I recall correctly

Boknows34

Yes, 2.06.96 at the 2017 WC. Today’s swim is the fourth fastest ever.

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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