SwimSwam’s Top 100 For 2022: Women’s #20-11

Our Top 100 For 2022 series continues with the 20th through 11th-ranked female swimmers for the coming year.

Rather than a ranking based on the performances that we saw in 2021, the series is geared towards who we expect to be the top performers in 2022.

The rankings are weighted heavily towards the 2022 Long Course World Championships, factoring in individual medal and world record potential, but we’ve also accounted for other major international events that will take place during the year. Note that long course gets a priority, but short course ability and ISL scoring potential are baked into the ranks as well.

We’ll be breaking down the top 100 into multiple installments, so keep an eye out as they’re released.

These lists are, by nature, subjective. If you disagree, leave your thoughts/ranks in the comments.

See also:

#20: Simona Quadarella, Italy – Quadarella has been the best female distance swimmer in Europe since 2018, having swept the 400, 800 and 1500 freestyle at the last two editions of LC Euros, and has been in the medal hunt in the 8/15 at the last two World Championships. Though the race is usually for silver behind the dominant Katie Ledecky, Quadarella was the benefactor of Ledecky’s withdrawal from the 1500 at the 2019 Worlds, soaring to the gold medal by almost eight seconds in a time of 15:40.89. The Italian also gave Ledecky a good run in the 800 free, winning silver in 8:14.99, and then competing in her debut Olympics last summer, won bronze in the same event. Quadarella was well off her 2019 form in Tokyo, but still managed to get on the podium, and given that she only just turned 23 in December, should have many more years of high-end swimming in her. Her PB in the 1500 still ranks her as the second-fastest active swimmer behind Ledecky, and given her recent run of success at the European Championships, should be expected to feast on the competition there once again in 2022. At LC Worlds she’s certainly in the mix for medals, though the next generation of women’s distance swimmers will be hot on her heels in the lead-up to Paris.

#19: Kate Douglass, USA – 2021 was a massive year for Douglass, who proved she’s much more than a short course swimmer at the U.S. Olympic Trials. After a phenomenal sophomore season at the University of Virginia, Douglass was a finalist in all four of her events in Omaha, qualifying for the U.S. Olympic team in the women’s 200 IM. Douglass hit a best time of 2:09.32 to qualify for the team, and then went 2:09-low three times in Tokyo en route to winning the bronze medal in a PB of 2:09.04. In addition to the 200 IM, the 20-year-old also finished the year ranked in the world’s top 10 in the 100 fly, having placed a close third at Trials in 56.56. Douglass finished the year with a bronze medal in the 200 IM at SC Worlds, and has an incredibly high ceiling moving forward given she’s also an elite performer in the 50 free (24.54) and could easily nab an individual spot on the Worlds team in that event. The New York native is almost too versatile for her own good, as she’s one of the fastest breaststrokers the NCAA has to offer, but due to her jam-packed schedule in other races, hasn’t explored the stroke much in long course.

#18: Alex Walsh, USA – Walsh was tabbed as a future star from a young age, having set U.S. National Age Group Records in backstroke, breaststroke and IM on her way up the ranks. After winning three gold medals at the 2019 Pan Am Games, including two individually in the 200 back and 200 IM, Walsh essentially geared all of her focus towards the 200 IM for the Olympic year and it paid off in spades. The UVA sophomore hit a best time of 2:08.87 in the semis at the Trials in Omaha before winning the final to qualify for her first Olympic team. The 20-year-old then re-lowered that PB down to 2:08.65 in the Tokyo final, winning silver while finishing just .13 back of gold medalist Yui Ohashi. There’s no doubt that the 200 IM will be Walsh’s premier event for LC Worlds in 2022, but she’s got a ton of versatility and could very well emerge as a threat in any number of other events, including the 400 IM. Walsh was 4:42.1 in-season right before the pandemic, and recently made some noise in the SCY pool with an ACC Record 4:01.4 in November.

#17: Sydney Pickrem, Canada – Pickrem has been on the verge of winning a major international title ever since she engineered a big drop to win bronze at the 2017 World Championships in the women’s 400 IM. The 24-year-old owns elite best times across the 200 breast (2:22.63), 200 IM (2:08.61) and 400 IM (4:32.68), having won bronze in both 200s at 2019 Worlds, and came into the Tokyo Olympics as one of the medley medal favorites. Pickrem ended up dropping the 400 IM and 200 breast at the Games due to non-COVID-related medical reasons, and then took sixth in the 200 IM. The Canadian rebounded with a strong ISL season, scoring 181 points for the London Roar, and then won gold in the 200 IM at SC Worlds. Given her performance in Abu Dhabi, we should expect to see Pickrem firing on all cylinders in 2022, with numerous medals within her grasp across LC Worlds and the Commonwealth Games.

#16: Penny Oleksiak, Canada – Oleksiak is a proven big-meet swimmer. She hasn’t been racing often in recent years, opting out of Seasons 2 and 3 of the ISL, and has seemingly been putting all of her focus towards performing at major championships. It’s largely been paying off, as she followed up her breakout 2016 Olympics—where she won four medals, including gold in the 100 freestyle—with three more in Tokyo, including individual bronze in the 200 free. Oleksiak hit lifetime bests in both the 100 free (52.59) and 200 free (1:54.70) in the 2021 Olympic final (taking fourth in the 100 free, .07 off a medal) and finished the year ranked fourth and fifth in the world, respectively. At this level, it’s rare to see a swimmer who’s been competing at the highest level for a number of years hit multiple personal best times in Olympic finals, but Oleksiak did just that, and at 21, she enters 2022 riding a lot of momentum. She’s also an excellent butterfly swimmer, though that’s on the backburner recently, but she could make some noise this year having made the 50 fly final in back-to-back World Championships. She also won silver in the 100 fly in Rio, but that doesn’t appear to be a primary focus moving forward given the recent dominance in the event from countrymate Maggie MacNeil.

#15: Lydia Jacoby, USA – Jacoby stunned the world when she dethroned Lilly King and won Olympic gold in the women’s 100 breaststroke in Tokyo, registering a time of 1:04.95. While both King (twice at U.S. Olympic Trials) and South African Tatjana Schoenmaker (Olympic prelims) swam faster than that time in 2021, it was Jacoby who got it done when it mattered, setting her off into this year with a ton of expectations. The 17-year-old’s win in the Olympic final was certainly a breakthrough, but it was far from a fluke, having been sub-1:06 four times between Trials and the first two rounds at the Games coming in. Jacoby continued to accrue international experience after the Olympics, including getting in three swims at SC Worlds before she was pulled from the meet early due to COVID-19 protocols. It remains to be seen how competitive Jacoby can be in the 50 breast in the long course pool—outside of the opening split of the 100 breast, she doesn’t have any official 50 breasts on record since 2016—but given her progression from Trials to the Olympics, her combination of talent and ability to step up in big moments should see her vying for World Championship glory in 2022.

#14: Hali Flickinger, USA – Flickinger’s major international resume has primarily centered around the 200 butterfly since breaking onto the scene at the Rio Games, placing seventh in the Olympic final, but she put her incredible versatility to good use in 2021, adding a second individual event to her Tokyo lineup in the form of the 400 IM. The former Georgia Bulldog hit a PB in the event to snag second at the U.S. Olympic Trials in 4:33.96, and then won her first Olympic medal in the event by taking bronze in Tokyo. Later in the meet, the 27-year-old added a second bronze in the 200 fly, clocking 2:05.65. Finishing the year ranked third in the world in both events, Flickinger, who now trains with Bob Bowman at Arizona State, should figure into the medal conversation in the 200 fly and 400 IM for the foreseeable future, two events Bowman knows a thing or two about training for. Flickinger’s vast skillset also lends itself to the ISL, as she showed up late in the 2021 campaign for the Cali Condors and finished third in MVP scoring in the league final.

#13: Kylie Masse, Canada – Masse’s consistency is unmatched in the women’s 100 backstroke over the last five years, as she’s now broken 59 seconds a mind-boggling 31 times. That includes three swims sub-58, a barrier she first cracked at the Canadian Olympic Trials (57.70) in June shortly after Australian Kaylee McKeown lowered the world down to 57.45. Going up against McKeown and former world record holder Regan Smith of the U.S., Masse rattled off two more 57-second swims in Tokyo to win silver behind McKeown, and she also recorded her first PB in over two years in the 200 back to earn silver in 2:05.42. Since winning bronze in the 100 back at the 2016 Games, Masse has been ever-present at the big meets, including winning four consecutive major championship titles in the 100 back from the 2017 to 2019 (two World titles, plus 2018 Commonwealth and Pan Pac gold). The 26-year-old has also shown steady progress in the short course pool, earning triple silver in the women’s backstrokes at SC Worlds, and will continue to be a mainstay on major podiums for years to come.

#12: Lilly King, USA – King’s run of invincibility in the women’s 100 breaststroke was truly something special, having won the 2016 Olympic title, back-to-back World Championship gold medals in 2017 and 2019 (also winning the 50 breast both times) and the 2018 Pan Pac title. She went on an unmatched unbeaten run to start her ISL career, and appeared to be a no-brainer choice to retain gold in Tokyo. But the American star admitted to struggling with motivation in the lead-up to the Games, having accomplished a career’s worth of accolades in such a short timeframe, and ended up falling to a surprise bronze in her best event in Tokyo. The 24-year-old did come back with an impressive swim in the 200 breast final, claiming silver behind the world record-setting Tatjana Schoenmaker and joining the elusive sub-2:20 club. And while it isn’t an event she’s put any focus into over the last two years, King also saw her 50 breast world record fall at the hands of Italian teenager Benedetta Pilato in 2021. So while King enters 2022 as a gold medal challenger across all three breaststroke events at LC Worlds, she’s no longer number one with a bullet in any of them.

#11: Regan Smith, USA – Smith was a revelation at the 2019 World Championships, demolishing Missy Franklin’s long-standing world record in the women’s 200 backstroke in 2:03.35, going on to win the gold medal in dominant fashion at 17. And then, despite the fact she wasn’t swimming the individual event because the American selection took place the year prior, Smith was given the opportunity to lead-off the women’s 400 medley relay team in the final and took full advantage, breaking the world record in the 100 back while becoming the first swimmer sub-58 in 57.57. Smith also established herself as a medal contender in the 200 fly in the lead-up to Tokyo, clocking 2:06.39 at the Des Moines PSS just days before the pandemic hit in early 2020, and entered Trials as a favorite to earn a berth in all three events. The 19-year-old won the 100 back, took second to qualify in the 200 fly, but surprisingly faded late and missed a spot in the 200 back, taking third. Smith responded with a strong showing at her first Olympics, winning bronze in the 100 back and silver in the 200 fly, bringing her PB in the latter down to an elite 2:05.30. Including a mixed relay lead-off, Smith was sub-58 in the 100 back four times in 2021, and finished the year ranked second worldwide in the 200 fly. If she can get her 200 back to return to her 2019 form, or close to it, she’s in the mix for gold in three different events at LC Worlds.

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Swammer
3 months ago

I can’t decide if I like McKeown at #1 or not. If she wanted to take a crack at a heavier schedule she could win 4 individual golds at worlds (100/200 back and 200/400im). The only problem is that none of those would be guaranteed wins, given the depth of women’s backstroke and Ohashi as the reigning double champ in IM. If things break badly for her she could end up with no golds instead of 4. Comparing this to Ledecky, who without Titmus will have 3 uncontested gold medals and can medal in the 200 as well. McKeown has more upside at this point, so I guess it’s a matter of picking between that or Ledecky’s consistency.

I… Read more »

Katie Legoatkey
Reply to  Swammer
3 months ago

Thinking about how Kaylee could have a Phelps-level medal count for one meet if things worked out for her, although that’s highly unlikely (at least 5 golds and 6 medals if you add the mixed medley relay)

But still cool to think about

Last edited 3 months ago by Yanyan Li
Sub13
Reply to  Katie Legoatkey
3 months ago

Best case scenario, if the Aussie team’s sole goal was to maximise Kaylee’s medals, she could realistically get 9.

Individual:
100, 200 back
200, 400 IM

Relay:
100 Free: PB of 54.29, Australia would still comfortably make the final with Kaylee on a heat swim.
200 Free: PB of 1:57.7. Same as above.
Medley and MMR: Kaylee swims back
Mixed free: Again, Australia is easily top 8 even with Kaylee’s 54.29.

So she could end up with 4 individual medals, 2 relay medals from swimming finals and 3 relay heat medals.

That would be insane.

Sub13
Reply to  Swammer
3 months ago

This is where the issue of relays come in. They shouldn’t count for as much as individuals, but they should count for SOMETHING. Without relays existing, McKeon almost certainly enters 4 individual events (with gold chance x 3 and medal chance x 1) and McKeown quite possibly does as well (with arguably 4 x gold chance). And it’s not like either of them are passengers in relays either: McKeon swam the fastest split in the field for both her 100 free relays (excluding Dressel obviously), was in the top quarter of the field in the 200 and swam the third fastest fly split in the medley field. Kaylee swam the fastest female back split in the MMR and second fastest… Read more »

Njones
Reply to  Swammer
3 months ago

Phelps really changed our mindset about what was possible regarding Multi event program. However he also had a huge buffer in Multi events and likely could have been faster with more singular focus.

Just because a talented swimmer like McKeown or McKeon can be competitive to win Multi events taken into context as singular swims, doesn’t mean they can do so after 6+ days and 12-15 previous races in their tank. Phelps was uniquely Phelps for a reason…

jamesjabc
3 months ago

My general comment is that quite a few on this list seem a little high.

Quadarella: In the mix for two medals, but very unlikely that either will be gold, and very possible she misses out altogether. Probably 10 spots too high.

Douglass: Again, too high. One bronze medal (which she likely doesn’t get if McKeown didn’t withdraw), 5th for the year in the 2IM. She also has her equal 9th for the year in the 100 fly, but given how stacked it is I wouldn’t say she is in the mix for a medal at all.

Walsh: Again, too high. One silver, which likely would have been a bronze if McKeown didn’t withdraw, and her second event is the… Read more »

Purple People Feeter
Reply to  jamesjabc
3 months ago

If Masse is a realistic chance for gold in two individual events, wouldn’t you say Regan is a realistic chance for gold in 2 individual events and a better chance for minor medals in her 3rd event (200 fly), so should be ahead of Masse?

If Masse and Smith are both realistic chances for gold in the same events…and Regan has a better 3rd event…and Regan is much younger….I’m not sure I follow why you’d have Masse ahead? Unless it’s just “nobody trusts Stanford training right now”?

jamesjabc
Reply to  Purple People Feeter
3 months ago

It depends what you consider “realistic”. I wouldn’t call Smith a realistic chance for gold in the 200 back based on current performance. She ranked 7th last year with the 16th fastest swim. Kaylee swam faster than Regan’s fastest swim 5 times last year and Masse twice. How many swimmers ranked 7th in an event would you consider a “realistic” chance for gold, other than Smith? I’m guessing probably zero.

Masse has a significantly higher chance of a gold medal, and any medal overall, than Smith in both the 100 and 200 back, and Masse’s Olympic times would have won her double gold in Rio. Smith has essentially no chance at a gold in the 200 fly, and her time… Read more »

Katie Legoatkey
Reply to  jamesjabc
3 months ago

I think you’re forgetting that this list isn’t 100% based off of 2021 performance, especially since it was a covid year that could have affected training disproportionately for different swimmers

Last edited 3 months ago by Yanyan Li
jamesjabc
Reply to  Katie Legoatkey
3 months ago

It doesn’t have to be 100% based off of 2021 performance. But if you’re talking about realistic chances of winning a gold medal, surely the most recent performances are the best indicator? Regan is the world record holder, but there are a bunch of world record holders who aren’t realistic gold chances in their events.

swimapologist
Reply to  jamesjabc
3 months ago

I’m starting to figure you out. I think you’re just a pessimist. You’d have about 30 swimmers between 20-40 and only 12 in the top 20 if you had your way.

jamesjabc
Reply to  swimapologist
3 months ago

Can you link me to another comment I’ve made that you deem to be pessimistic?

I think it’s pretty clear who the top 10 are going to be, and I agree with all of them. I’ve also said that Masse, King, Jacoby, Smith and Oleksiak all belong in the top 20. Flickinger also belongs there, but at around 20, not 14. So there’s 16 already.

AnEn
3 months ago

For me out of those 10 only Jacoby, King, Masse, Flickinger, Oleksiak and maybe Douglass belong in the 11-20 range. Smith should be top 10 (instead of MacNeil), while Quadarella, Pickrem and especially Walsh are ranked too high. I would rank McIntosh, Chikunova, O’Callaghan, Curzan and maybe also Huske/M. Wilson/Yang Junxuan/Gorbenko over those 3. What is the reasoning for ranking Quadarella ahead of Li Bingie and Walsh ahead of Sullivan for example?

Gfshuyrh
Reply to  AnEn
3 months ago

Maggie and Smith have the same number of backstroke Wr’s at this point but Maggie has an Olympic gold in 100 fly so id say Maggie > Smith.

Troyy
Reply to  Gfshuyrh
3 months ago

LCM > SCM > SCY

Elise
3 months ago

I can’t tell if Lydia Jacoby either 1. Is more suited for LC, and will pretty much only be a 100/200 Breaststroker at the World/Olympic Level, or 2. Is just pretty much a world class racer and really isn’t per se the best swimmer in the world but is more the best racer in the world who happened to peak at the right time… her recent success in SCY and SCM is not what you would expect from someone who went 1:04.9, but I still think she has serious chances at a world title next year.

Elise
Reply to  Elise
3 months ago

I mean this year 2022

jamesjabc
Reply to  Elise
3 months ago

It’s hard to tell for a young swimmer with sudden success in one event. I think World Champs will probably give us an idea of where she’s headed.

McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

for a bit of fun, I looked back on last year’s lists to see how they held up.

most overrated male:
Daiya Seto (#4)
was tempted to say Sun Yang (#5) though

most underrated male:
Zac Stubblety-Cook (#85)

most overrated female:
Simone Manuel (#8)

most underrated female:
Tatjana Schoenmaker (#50)

kinda funny how both 200 breast champs were low on the lists. while jacoby and hafnaoui were the most underrated gold medalists since no one talked about them before last year, I’m critiquing the top 100 list itself, which they did not make.

Stewart 100 back gold in Fukuoka
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

It will be fun to revisit the comment section too.

jamesjabc
Reply to  Stewart 100 back gold in Fukuoka
3 months ago

The comment section is gold. A few highlights:

  1. James Wilby will definitely win the 200 breast in Tokyo.
  2. People very unhappy MacNeil was ranked above Titmus as she only swims one event competitively (which is actually pretty true).
  3. People almost universally think Titmus was underrated at #10 (again, this is obviously true).
  4. Someone (multiple people actually) who said Kaylee should be ranked above Regan was hounded and downvoted to oblivion LOL.
  5. More Regan: Kaylee NEEDS TO swim a 2:02 to have any chance at gold in Tokyo in the 200 back LOL.
  6. More Regan: She will easily win the 200 Fly with a 2:04.5.
  7. More Regan: She will win minimum 3 golds in Tokyo.
  8. Kaylee will definitely underperform at
… Read more »

Calvin
Reply to  jamesjabc
3 months ago

Lol. To be fair, Regan was looking to have an amazing Games.

Troyy
Reply to  jamesjabc
3 months ago

This list is hilarious.

Kate Douglass NCAA MVP
Reply to  jamesjabc
3 months ago

ngl this just makes me sad about regan smith

STRAIGHTBLACKLINE
Reply to  jamesjabc
3 months ago

I said last year that McKeon deserved to be in the top ten. My recollection is that I got plenty of downvotes.

Stewart 100 back gold in Fukuoka
Reply to  jamesjabc
3 months ago

13. Seto should be ranked ahead of Peaty.
14. Tom Dean doesn’t have a shot in anything but 4×200 free relay.

Stewart 100 back gold in Fukuoka
Reply to  Stewart 100 back gold in Fukuoka
3 months ago

15. Someone said Rylov can potentially get 3 relay medals, in two medleys and 4×100 free relay, but he has no chance to make the 4×200 free relay. And the reality is his only relay medal was from the 4×200 free relay. lol.

McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  jamesjabc
3 months ago

deleted

Last edited 3 months ago by McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

Forgot to mention that Finke was #67, so it really depends what you value more – an extra individual gold or being ranked 18 places back

seton
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

Rooney would get my vote for most overrated. He was Top 25 last year and now won’t crack Top 100 😂

Admin
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

And to think that none of those were particularly controversial at the time. Seto at #4, Simone at #8, could argue that maybe Tatjana was 10 spots too low, but ZSC looked like the odd man out in a really deep event.

What do you think the biggest misses were among swimmers whose ranking was more based on some subjective expectation than an obvious continuation of their trajectory? Maybe Mitch Larkin at #15? Seemed like maybe he was “back” based on his 2019 Worlds results, but that didn’t pan out. Maxime Rooney? Who didn’t make the US team but we had at #27 – though based on how he finished 2019, maybe that wasn’t too much of a stretch really.

McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  Braden Keith
3 months ago

of course. just pointing out that no previews will perfect, because there will always be underperformers and people who come out of nowhere. still fun to speculate though

I’d say Sun Yang, since his qualification for tokyo depended on his legal team. aus w100 freestylers and american womens backstrokers get ranked really low, because while they would be medal contenders, there’s a good chance they wont qualify. sun yang was in a similar position going into 2021, yet was ranked 5th

Last edited 3 months ago by McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
seton
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

Yeah, obviously Sun. It was controversial at the time judging by the comments section

Rafael
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

One thing is someone flopping or surprising, other is rating Erika brown top high based on ????? And rating people who would need a big improvement, not flopping or field getting Weaker ahead of proven swimmers with better times

jamesjabc
Reply to  Rafael
3 months ago

Literally Erika Brown was ranked 20th for the year in the only event she swims. She was the slowest leg of the 12 swimmers who medalled in the free relay. And she’s not even young. Like, her ranking is the #1 most baffling on the list.

mclovin
Reply to  Braden Keith
3 months ago

I still cant understand what happened to Rooney.. he was primed to do big things this year. Bad timing reaching his peak I guess.

The unoriginal Tim
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

At the time Seto was considered a certainty to win three medals with at least one gold so not ao far fetched.

jamesjabc
Reply to  McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
3 months ago

Simone was #5 last year, not #8. She was even higher. Her and Efimova at #7 are the only two in the top 10 without an individual medal.

Nonrevhoofan
3 months ago

Proud of my UVA women, Kate and Alex (and Emma and Paige on earlier lists). When the year is out, it would not surprise me if Gretchen Walsh deserves a placement on this list of Top 100 2022 performers.

Jess
3 months ago

Of course there are 6 Americans in the 11-20. Why wouldn’t there be. How many Olympic Gold medalists are these ranked higher than considering literally 1 of the 6 actually got an Olympic Gold in an individual or relay?

waaaaaahmbulance
Reply to  Jess
3 months ago

Uhhhhhhhh only 9 different women actually won Olympic gold medals in Tokyo in individual events.

Y’all act like there are 30 swimmers winning Olympic gold medals every year lol.

Jess
Reply to  waaaaaahmbulance
3 months ago

So Olympic relay gold medallists who also won individual medals should be ranked lower than these because these are American? There are relay gold medallists who didn’t even make the list but 5 Americans who did no better than silver (some only getting bronze) are ranked between 11-20.

A reminder that Kathleen Dawson (as an example) broke the European Records in the 50 + 100 Back + 4×100 Medley, ended the year ranked 3rd + 4th in the 50 and 100 respectively. Won an Olympic gold setting a world record in the mixed medley and yet was ranked #58. No argument could be made to convince me that she would be ranked there if she were American. There are… Read more »

killerbees
Reply to  Jess
3 months ago

No you right. Kathleen Dawson, Freya Anderson, and Anna Hopkin should all be top 20 because they won gold on that mixed relay.

Y’all are so busy choking on your “AMERICAN BIAS” wordvomit that you’re missing your own biases. Gee, I wonder where Jess is from? I don’t have any earthly guess. I’m 100% certain you’re not from the UK, right?

Kathleen Dawson at #58 is about right. You don’t have to like it, but that’s probably your British bias showing.

Seems like maybe you’re just looking for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic medals table ranking. You can see that here: https://swimswam.com/emma-mckeon-leads-all-tokyo2020-olympic-swimming-individual-medalists/

She’s ranked 39th there. Are you happy now?

Also, James Sutherland is still Canadian, so…

Jess
Reply to  killerbees
3 months ago

Not once have i mentioned Freya or Anna and ive not seen you justify why Dawson is ranked below slower backstrokers rather than assuming my nationality which is infact irish, not british.

tea rex
Reply to  Jess
3 months ago

If you want to count relays, that improves all Americans’ stock (yes, more than GBR because USA can medal in womens and mixed relays).

Using your Dawson example, 12 swimmers won relay gold (19 counting prelims). Her 58.8 was among the weakest of those splits. Ranking 4th for the year in a stacked backstroke field is great, but it means her only likely medal is leading off for Peaty. Overall, seems about right – ranked less than the 58.0 backstroker she was at Euros, more than the 58.6 backstroker she was at Olympics, with a little bonus for being on a mixed MR with Peaty.

Last edited 3 months ago by tea rex
Rafael
Reply to  tea rex
3 months ago

This all began due to Erika Brown super high rating..

Troyy
Reply to  Rafael
3 months ago

It’s so strange really. You’d expect the the US’s 100 freestylers won’t have two off years in a row so it’d be a surprise if she gets anything more than a single relay swim possibly only a prelim.

jamesjabc
Reply to  Jess
3 months ago

You are definitely right about Dawson. She ended the year ranked 3rd and 4th in two LCM WC events. Compare that to Douglass, whose best ranks were 5th and 9th, yet she somehow landed in the top 20.

McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
Reply to  Jess
3 months ago

8 individual olympic gold medalists will be in the top 10, 5 of whom won multiple individual golds in tokyo. the american women only won 3 gold medals in tokyo, so of course the top 10 isn’t majority american.

as for the other 2 spaces, haughey won 2 silvers in world class times (better than jacoby’s time tbh) and is in good form at the moment. she’s in gold medal contention at lcm worlds, will win golds at asian
games and could clean up at scm worlds if she competes there again.

sjostrom was coming off an injury and still did pretty well in tokyo in multiple events. considering she’s in a better position this year, it’s likely that… Read more »

Last edited 3 months ago by McKeown-Hodges-McKeon-Campbell
AnEn
Reply to  Jess
3 months ago

I think of those 6 “only” Walsh and maybe Douglass are overranked, while Smith is underranked. I also don’t get how Baker isn’t even top 100. Personally i also think that McHugh, Deloof, Nordin and Margalis have a case to be top 100.

Katie Legoatkey
Reply to  AnEn
3 months ago

Who does regan have more potential than in the top 10? Sjostrom? Haughey? Ohashi? Not saying I disagree, but I’d like to hear why

Also IMO the only Americans overrnaked is Lily king, Douglass and Walsh deserve their respective spots although Douglass > Walsh due to KD having more potential in multiple LCM events

jamesjabc
Reply to  AnEn
3 months ago

There are already 6 American women in the top 100 who didn’t make the Olympic team. We don’t need more lol

moonlight
Reply to  Jess
3 months ago

jess – don’t be so jealous. it’s not a nice look.

matt
3 months ago

macneil 1

About James Sutherland

James Sutherland

James swam five years at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, specializing in the 200 free, back and IM. He finished up his collegiate swimming career in 2018, graduating with a bachelor's degree in economics. In 2019 he completed his graduate degree in sports journalism. Prior to going to Laurentian, James swam …

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