Paige McKenna Explains Winning the 1650 NCAA Title with 2 Torn Labrums

2022 NCAA DIVISION I WOMEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Reported by Anne Lepesant.

WOMEN 1650 YARD FREESTYLE – FASTEST HEAT

  • NCAA Record: 15:03.31 – Katie Ledecky, Stanford (2017)
  • Meet Record: 15:07.70 – Katie Ledecky, Stanford (2017)
  • American Record: 15:03.31 – Katie Ledecky, Stanford (2017)
  • US Open Record: 15:03.31 – Katie Ledecky, Stanford (2017)
  • Pool Record: 15:32.72 – Leah Smith, Virginia (2016)
  • 2021 Champion: Paige Madden, Virginia – 15:41.86

Podium:

  1. Paige McKenna, FR Wisconsin – 15:40.84
  2. Erica Sullivan, FR Texas – 15:45.94
  3. Kensey McMahon, SR Alabama – 15:47.60
  4. Evie Pfeifer, 5Y Texas – 15:48.34
  5. Abigail McCulloh, FR Georgia – 15:49.87
  6. Madelyn Donohoe, JR Virginia – 15:55.14
  7. Lola Mull, Northwestern – 15:55.96
  8. Kristen Stege, JR Tennessee – 15:59.49

McKenna continued to outpace Sullivan from the earlier heat, flipping at 12:16.43 at the 1300. She got the bell at 15:11.61, followed by McMahon in lane 1 and McCulloh in lane 8. McKenna stopped the clock at 15:40.84 for Wisconsin’s first title of the meet. She eclipsed Sullivan’s 15:45.95 by just over 5 seconds.

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Anonymous
8 months ago

It’s like that swimmer at practice that says “my foot hurts” or “I don’t feel good”, then proceeds to wax everyone in the pool.

paige’s biggest fan
8 months ago

THATS MY PEGE!!!!❤️❤️

Former Big10
8 months ago

I’ve had this surgery on both hips, it’s not a fun one. Especially if there’s FAI at the femur/hip connection. Congrats on your amazing performance!!!

Swammer
8 months ago

See, Coach, this is why swimmers should never run!

Yawns
Reply to  Swammer
8 months ago

As humans we are made to run…swimmers can run and should run (most do sprints to develop explosive abilities) but like most people beginning something, when they go to an extreme (like not running to running 5,6,7,8,etc… miles in one sitting after never dabbling in that area) thats when you ask for an injury. Also in swimming when we look at strength and Conditioning small muscles tend to be neglected in favor of doing bigger compound movements. Most of these injuries are preventable, but really it boils down to how extreme you go from being a water athlete to all of a sudden running 10Ks because its quarantine. There was a podcast with a bunch of swim coaches talking about… Read more »

MTK
Reply to  Yawns
8 months ago

I don’t know that sprinting is the best way to develop explosive power for a swimmer. Plyometrics are probably better bang for your buck and translate better to the start/turn explosiveness that swimmers are after. Swim dryland generally seems to favour plyo over running.

I think plyo for power, and some stationary bike work for aerobic capacity are better bets than running in terms of injury prevention and less joint impact.

Last edited 8 months ago by MTK

About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

Coleman started his journey in the water at age 1, and although he actually has no memory of that, something must have stuck. A Missouri native, he joined the Columbia Swim Club at age 9, where he is still remembered for his stylish dragon swim trunks. After giving up on …

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