SSPC: Michael Andrew “I’m honestly tired of being the guy that can only swim 50s”

In the SwimSwam Podcast dive deeper into the sport you love with insider conversations about swimming. Hosted by Coleman Hodges and Gold Medal Mel Stewart, SwimSwam welcomes both the biggest names in swimming that you already know, and rising stars that you need to get to know, as we break down the past, present, and future of aquatic sports.

I sat down with New York Breakers star Michael Andrew, who got into where he’s at in the ISL bubble. Andrew was raw and didn’t sugar-coat his analysis: he’s not where he wants to be. He’s gotten better each time he’s raced, but quarantine certainly had an effect on his training, especially considering racing IS a big part of his training.

Michael even looks past ISL, saying he doesn’t just want to be a 50 guy heading into the 2021 Olympic Trials. Andrew vows to put in a block of work come the new year that he thinks will put him in a prime spot heading into the 2021 Trials in Omaha.

Music: Otis McDonald
www.otismacmusic.com

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Opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of the interviewed guests do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, and viewpoints of the hosts, SwimSwam Partners, LLC and/or SwimSwam advertising partners.

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Andreas
2 months ago

Mile at Olympic trials here we go!

Sun Yangs Hammer
2 months ago

I really hope so. For all the jokes in the comments here, he is a talent and I’d like to see him succeed. The 1:56 in March is some serious potential

Old Man Chalmers
2 months ago

then train for it

M d e
Reply to  Old Man Chalmers
2 months ago

He does.

Guy goes a 1:56 200 IM, 59 100 Brst, 51 100 fly, 53 100 bk and 49 100 FS.

The only one of those swims that isn’t very impressive is the 100 FS.

Michael Andrews problem isn’t that he can only swim 50s, it’s that these other swimmers are incredible too.

At a certain point I think considering a change is a good thing, sure, but lots of swimmers train a more traditional manner and are worse than MA.

Riccardo
Reply to  M d e
2 months ago

None of those 100 times are good relative to the 50s and that is why you have to question the efficacy of the training.

If I had a high school swimmer that was 21.4 in the 50 free and 49.4 in the 100 I would think that they had an inefficient freestyle.

There is not a single high level coach out there who isn’t a pure distance coach that will make the argument that race pace reps are not important, they are probably the most important part of training, they would just say that its probably not the only thing you should do.

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  Riccardo
2 months ago

not to mention his free leg in said 1:56 200 IM…

M d e
Reply to  Riccardo
2 months ago

All out sprinters are a thing. His 100 FS (and 200 IM backend) fall apart due to what I would argue is poor breathing technique imo, not a conditioning issue. And you seem to agree. His Brst, Bk and Fly back ends are acceptable to fine. The argument just doesn’t add up to me. He’s not fit enough, because he doesn’t do enough volume, but it’s a technical efficiency problem, that couldn’t possibly be solved without doing a more traditional workload? And if he did this at what point is he a success from your perspective? I just kind of feel that at this point unless he is an Olympic champ people will act like he is not a great… Read more »

Riccardo
Reply to  M d e
2 months ago

The argument doesn’t add up because he demonstrated ability to be successful in 100s, 200s and even the 400 IM as 13-14 year old. He was actually more accomplished in those distances at the same age than Dressel. What changed with the two of them as they got older? He dies in every 100 of stroke compared to athletes he is comparable with or even better than in the 50 its just the freestyle is the one that it is most glaring. Should Bruno Fratus coming off shoulder surgery be able to back half a 100 free better than a 19-20 year old? With regards to your question about his freestyle technique. Why hasn’t it improved? If he doesn’t need… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Riccardo
Former Big10
Reply to  Riccardo
2 months ago

You’re giving high school swimming WAY too much credit. Half of the head coaches, in my Midwestern state, couldn’t tell you who Adam Peaty or Frederica Pelligrini are….

Riccardo
Reply to  Former Big10
2 months ago

When I say high level coaches I’m talking about elite developmental club teams and above. I agree that many especially at the high school level are not following high level swimming or training.

oldFly
Reply to  Old Man Chalmers
2 months ago

Is that the response to only the title? He analysed and said substantially about his plan to handle that.

About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

Coleman started his journey in the water at age 1, and although he actually has no memory of that, something must have stuck. A Missouri native, he joined the Columbia Swim Club at age 9, where he is still remembered for his stylish dragon swim trunks. After giving up on …

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