Race Video: Michael Andrew 100 Yard Breast 13-14 NAG Record, 53.88

Swimming news – 100 breaststroke NAG Record reported by Braden Keith

14-year old pro swimmer Michael Andrew has re-broken his own National Age Group Record in the 100 yard breaststroke, swimming a 53.88 to win the 14 & under division at the 2014 NASA Junior National Cup. Andrew split 25.07/28.81 in the race, which clears the 54.04 that he did at the Jenks Sectional on March 7th.

Andrew became the firs 13-14 to go under 56 seconds, then the first to go under 55 seconds, and he’s now the first to go under 54 seconds in this event, which shows just how far he (and Reece Whitley) have taken this record in the last year.

Andrew now holds the 6 fastest times in this event in the history of the age group, and is 1.8 seconds clear of Reece Whitley’s second-ranked 55.61.

He wasn’t the fastest swimmer overall at this meet in the event, Texas-bound high school senior Austin Temple was a 52.87 in the 16 & up division. That time is within a tenth of what Texas’ breaststroker split on their 400 medley relay at NCAA’s on Thursday.

You can follow Michael Andrew on Twitter here. 

USRPT info here.

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Paul
7 years ago

BEAST!! Would love to start seeing some underwater footage

swimnut
7 years ago

I feel like this kid’s been 14 for at least a couple years now.

James
7 years ago

That time is just unreal. He would walk on to any D1 program in the country today; already has a host of B standards and rapidly moving down. The true test begins with the LCM season; which I am sure will see some records within a few weeks broken.

Rafael
Reply to  James
7 years ago

By Now he got some US record… but still no WR record for any race of 14 years old..

at 15 some times to beat would be off to charts.. It is the age Thorpe Phelps and Gyurta exploded.. many of them WR at their time..

pvdh
Reply to  Rafael
7 years ago

It was also before the plastic, full body suits…

aswimfan
Reply to  pvdh
7 years ago

In fact, ALL of Thorpe’s 15-16 age records were swum in BRIEFS.

Ben
Reply to  Gold Medal Mel Stewart
7 years ago

.24 I thought… its 47.23 to 46.99 if I am not mistaken?

floppy
7 years ago

His breaststroke is his most unconventional stroke, but it seems to be working better and better for him.
He stays very low in the water, and has a very short stroke with high turnover. I counted his strokes/lap as 5/7/8/8… most elite breaststrokers (especially those 6’4″+) take fewer than that.

G
Reply to  floppy
7 years ago

Surprisingly, his turnover is the same rate as Cordes’s.

MarkB
Reply to  G
7 years ago

MUCH faster than Cordes!

lane 0
7 years ago

going by numbers for 13-14 in LCM:

he’s the 4th fastest in the 50 freestyle (behind Darren Lim, Shehab Youkes, and Kyle
Chalmers.)

3rd fastest in the 100 freestyle (behind Chalmers and Lim)

fastest in the 100 back

3rd fastest in the 200 back (behind Peirsol and Murphy)

fastest in the 100 fly

3rd fastest in the 100 breast (behind Daniel Gyurta and David Mercado)

fastest in the 200 im

65th in the 400 im

recap: he’s fastest ever in the 200 im and the 100 back and 100 fly

Rafael
Reply to  lane 0
7 years ago

Actually fastest in 100 back is Irie Ryousuke..

on 200 back the fastest is Hagino..

On 200/400 II hagino is also the fastest

On 100 Fly there is a Japanese swimmer who is faster.. aswimswam or Bobogigi have the times

bobo gigi
Reply to  Rafael
7 years ago

Sorry. I have no idea.

Scuba Steve
Reply to  bobo gigi
7 years ago

100 back is Hagino 56.25

Rafael and Briand are right on the others

Rafael
Reply to  Scuba Steve
7 years ago

And Ryousuke? If I recall it was Irie the fastest 100 Backstroke on all ages until 18 right?

Scuba Steve
Reply to  Scuba Steve
7 years ago

I think the only Ryosuke Irie junior record is 18 years 200 back. Hagino has the 14 year double and the 18 year 100 back. 16 year 100 back is Murphy and 200 back is Piersol

Briand
Reply to  Rafael
7 years ago

Yuki Kobori, 53.18 2008

G
7 years ago

Okay, I think I have to address this now. Over the past couple of years, I’ve seen a dichotomy forming in breaststroke technique, mostly in the body position. On one side, you have Gyurta with a very exaggerated back/hip movement and nearly a vertical body position before the recovery phase. Brenton Rickard also has this technique. Akihiro Yamaguchi is similar. Then you have guys like Andrew Wilson from Emory, Chuck Katis from Cal, and Michael Andrew here having a very “low-profile” body position that barely moves throughout the stroke. There is a “hunch” in the upper back. My coach who has taught numerous national-teamers also teaches this technique.

Does anyone have any information regarding these two very different breaststroke techniques?… Read more »

G
Reply to  G
7 years ago

Low technique:
High stroke rate, shorter stroke, little to no back/hip movement

High technique:
Low stroke rate, longer stroke, much back/hip movement

PsychoDad
Reply to  G
7 years ago

Gyurta won everything there is in past 2-3 years, other you mentioned did not and never will. Good you pointed that Gyurta lifts high as some here claimed he does not :).
However, if you watch Ruta that also lifts high and looks straight forward, she has very high stroke turnover (sprinter); so staying high does not necessarily mean low stroke count. Also, “shoulder hunch” is actually “elbow” squeeze. You should NEVER hunch shoulders especially on 200 as that will tire – hunch with squeezing elbows inside body. High body stroke is the way to swim it, IMO – because then you use the most powerful force in nature to your advantage – gravity.

coacherik
Reply to  PsychoDad
7 years ago

Yes! Psychodad always delivers!!

PsychoDad
Reply to  coacherik
7 years ago

I am pleased to see I did not disappoint you. I am here for your personal entertainment and education.

PsychoDad
Reply to  coacherik
7 years ago

PART 2: This is just for CoachErik’s personal education:

I often ask “stay low” groupies: if staying low is so good, would, if allowed, underwater streamline and kick be fastest breaststroke. That is as low as you can get. Smart answer is: stroke also counts. All right, if stroke counts, how high do you need to lift on stroke? if you say as low as Michael you increase water resistance because of your arms. Look how far back he pulls his albows. He is pulling his body backward instead of keeping elbows in front to left gravity work by shifting his upper body forward. he gets little upper body trust forward, the way Gyurta does. “Stay low” crowed would now… Read more »

o_O
Reply to  PsychoDad
7 years ago

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGfEGDWrDrY

Some people are going up higher and some staying lower. Gyurta is clearly not going the highest. I would think that the most important thing is the position of their body in the water because that is what is creating the resistance, not the air or gravity.

Ruta is a sprinter and a woman. Comparing her technique with Gyurta is like comparing Nathan Adrian’s freestyle to Katie Ledecky’s.

PsychoDad
Reply to  o_O
7 years ago

Physics has never been accused of sex discrimination.

o_O
Reply to  o_O
7 years ago

I’m not sure what your sex discrimination comment has to do with anything, but I’ll explain what I meant using “physics”

This is from wikipedia so it may be inaccurate, but it illustrates my point just fine.
Ruta – 5’8″ 141lbs
Gyurta – 6’1″ 170lbs

They are different sized objects and that means they are going to encounter different amounts of resistance in different places. Women also have more body fat, this changes their buoyancy and dimensions at a given weight. Women also have different shaped bodies. Typically longer legs, wider hips, breasts, narrower shoulders, etc. etc. etc.

Beyond just the shape and weight of the swimmer, men can be significantly stronger than women at the same… Read more »

sven
Reply to  PsychoDad
7 years ago

Semantics here, but gravity is actually by far the weakest of the fundamental forces. Therefore, I propose a switch in priority to utilizing the strong nuclear force during breaststroke in order to maximize speed.

Srsly, tho, I believe the higher stroke is as valid as the lower stroke IF the athlete has the power in their stroke to maintain it. Staying low is clearly working for MA, and I’m not going to sit here and say he would be 52.8 if he got higher.

I think a few advantages to going higher, if it’s done correctly, are the hip slide (shoulders go up therefore hips slide forward) and a smoother transition from the insweep to recovery. I’ve found that, in… Read more »

Reply to  PsychoDad
7 years ago

“because then you use the most powerful force in nature to your advantage – gravity.”

That’s not free energy… please recheck your math. 🙂

SprintDude9000
Reply to  Paul McCall
7 years ago

Paul I was going to write the same thing – PSYCHODAD’s knowledge of basic physics is evidently sketchy at best…

Sven
Reply to  Paul McCall
7 years ago

You guys are idiots. Everyone knows Gravity is what holds the most fundamental particles of matter together and that it is the strongest force in nature. And yes, it is a proper noun. Acknowledge its power and respect it accordingly.

I actually went back and cross referenced every breaststroke world record since 1960 with local tidal charts, and 91% of WR’s since then have been set during the Perigean Tide of that particular location. It appears that breaststroke is strongly affected by the tidal pull of the moon.

@PsychoDad: I’m sorry for this, I can’t resist. I think this could be interpreted as being more mean spirited than I like to be here on SwimSwam, but I really do mean… Read more »

HISWIMCOACH
7 years ago

Psychodad (+1)

Reply to  HISWIMCOACH
7 years ago

Heeeeeeeeee’s Baaaaaaaaaaaaaak.

All we needed to do was talk more breaststroke.

PsychoDad
Reply to  Hulk Swim
7 years ago

Not true., On my twitter account you name called because of backstroke this morning.

Reply to  PsychoDad
7 years ago

I didn’t name call, and it had nothing to do with backstroke. Sunday practices with dad was what got my interest.

ChestRockwell
Reply to  Hulk Swim
7 years ago

Wait, people actually know who this guy is in real life? He runs his mouth like this and isn’t hiding in a cave somewhere? I always wondered why people on “Cops” agree to let their faces be shown, this is kinda like that.

aswimfan
Reply to  Hulk Swim
7 years ago

I often disagreed with many of Psychodad’s points, but this is uncalled for.

About Gold Medal Mel Stewart

Gold Medal Mel Stewart

MEL STEWART Jr., aka Gold Medal Mel, won three Olympic medals at the 1992 Olympic Games. Mel's best event was the 200 butterfly. He is a former World, American, and NCAA Record holder in the 200 butterfly. As a writer/producer and sports columnist, Mel has contributed to Yahoo Sports, Universal Sports, …

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