Race Video: Michael Andrew 100 Yard Breast 13-14 NAG Record, 53.88

  95 Gold Medal Mel Stewart | April 07th, 2014 | Featured, International, News, Video

Swimming news – 100 breaststroke NAG Record reported by Braden Keith

14-year old pro swimmer Michael Andrew has re-broken his own National Age Group Record in the 100 yard breaststroke, swimming a 53.88 to win the 14 & under division at the 2014 NASA Junior National Cup. Andrew split 25.07/28.81 in the race, which clears the 54.04 that he did at the Jenks Sectional on March 7th.

Andrew became the firs 13-14 to go under 56 seconds, then the first to go under 55 seconds, and he’s now the first to go under 54 seconds in this event, which shows just how far he (and Reece Whitley) have taken this record in the last year.

Andrew now holds the 6 fastest times in this event in the history of the age group, and is 1.8 seconds clear of Reece Whitley’s second-ranked 55.61.

He wasn’t the fastest swimmer overall at this meet in the event, Texas-bound high school senior Austin Temple was a 52.87 in the 16 & up division. That time is within a tenth of what Texas’ breaststroker split on their 400 medley relay at NCAA’s on Thursday.

You can follow Michael Andrew on Twitter here. 

USRPT info here.

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95 Comments on "Race Video: Michael Andrew 100 Yard Breast 13-14 NAG Record, 53.88"


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Paul
2 years 5 months ago

BEAST!! Would love to start seeing some underwater footage

swimnut
2 years 5 months ago

I feel like this kid’s been 14 for at least a couple years now.

James
2 years 5 months ago

That time is just unreal. He would walk on to any D1 program in the country today; already has a host of B standards and rapidly moving down. The true test begins with the LCM season; which I am sure will see some records within a few weeks broken.

Rafael
2 years 5 months ago

By Now he got some US record… but still no WR record for any race of 14 years old..

at 15 some times to beat would be off to charts.. It is the age Thorpe Phelps and Gyurta exploded.. many of them WR at their time..

pvdh
2 years 5 months ago

It was also before the plastic, full body suits…

aswimfan
2 years 5 months ago

In fact, ALL of Thorpe’s 15-16 age records were swum in BRIEFS.

floppy
2 years 5 months ago

His breaststroke is his most unconventional stroke, but it seems to be working better and better for him.
He stays very low in the water, and has a very short stroke with high turnover. I counted his strokes/lap as 5/7/8/8… most elite breaststrokers (especially those 6’4″+) take fewer than that.

G
2 years 5 months ago

Surprisingly, his turnover is the same rate as Cordes’s.

MarkB
2 years 5 months ago

MUCH faster than Cordes!

lane 0
2 years 5 months ago

going by numbers for 13-14 in LCM:

he’s the 4th fastest in the 50 freestyle (behind Darren Lim, Shehab Youkes, and Kyle
Chalmers.)

3rd fastest in the 100 freestyle (behind Chalmers and Lim)

fastest in the 100 back

3rd fastest in the 200 back (behind Peirsol and Murphy)

fastest in the 100 fly

3rd fastest in the 100 breast (behind Daniel Gyurta and David Mercado)

fastest in the 200 im

65th in the 400 im

recap: he’s fastest ever in the 200 im and the 100 back and 100 fly

Rafael
2 years 5 months ago

Actually fastest in 100 back is Irie Ryousuke..

on 200 back the fastest is Hagino..

On 200/400 II hagino is also the fastest

On 100 Fly there is a Japanese swimmer who is faster.. aswimswam or Bobogigi have the times

bobo gigi
2 years 5 months ago

Sorry. I have no idea.

Scuba Steve
2 years 5 months ago

100 back is Hagino 56.25

Rafael and Briand are right on the others

Rafael
2 years 5 months ago

And Ryousuke? If I recall it was Irie the fastest 100 Backstroke on all ages until 18 right?

Scuba Steve
2 years 5 months ago

I think the only Ryosuke Irie junior record is 18 years 200 back. Hagino has the 14 year double and the 18 year 100 back. 16 year 100 back is Murphy and 200 back is Piersol

Briand
2 years 5 months ago

Yuki Kobori, 53.18 2008

G
2 years 5 months ago

Okay, I think I have to address this now. Over the past couple of years, I’ve seen a dichotomy forming in breaststroke technique, mostly in the body position. On one side, you have Gyurta with a very exaggerated back/hip movement and nearly a vertical body position before the recovery phase. Brenton Rickard also has this technique. Akihiro Yamaguchi is similar. Then you have guys like Andrew Wilson from Emory, Chuck Katis from Cal, and Michael Andrew here having a very “low-profile” body position that barely moves throughout the stroke. There is a “hunch” in the upper back. My coach who has taught numerous national-teamers also teaches this technique.

Does anyone have any information regarding these two very different breaststroke techniques? There seems to be no correlation with height/size over which technique someone swims with. I’ve heard breaststroke varies the most between individuals comapred to other strokes, but I’m wondering if anyone else has noticed this too.

G
2 years 5 months ago

Low technique:
High stroke rate, shorter stroke, little to no back/hip movement

High technique:
Low stroke rate, longer stroke, much back/hip movement

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

Gyurta won everything there is in past 2-3 years, other you mentioned did not and never will. Good you pointed that Gyurta lifts high as some here claimed he does not :).
However, if you watch Ruta that also lifts high and looks straight forward, she has very high stroke turnover (sprinter); so staying high does not necessarily mean low stroke count. Also, “shoulder hunch” is actually “elbow” squeeze. You should NEVER hunch shoulders especially on 200 as that will tire – hunch with squeezing elbows inside body. High body stroke is the way to swim it, IMO – because then you use the most powerful force in nature to your advantage – gravity.

coacherik
2 years 5 months ago

Yes! Psychodad always delivers!!

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

I am pleased to see I did not disappoint you. I am here for your personal entertainment and education.

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

PART 2: This is just for CoachErik’s personal education:

I often ask “stay low” groupies: if staying low is so good, would, if allowed, underwater streamline and kick be fastest breaststroke. That is as low as you can get. Smart answer is: stroke also counts. All right, if stroke counts, how high do you need to lift on stroke? if you say as low as Michael you increase water resistance because of your arms. Look how far back he pulls his albows. He is pulling his body backward instead of keeping elbows in front to left gravity work by shifting his upper body forward. he gets little upper body trust forward, the way Gyurta does. “Stay low” crowed would now ask “Yes but lifting high increases drag.” and those are ones that never saw inside a science class. Whatever is outside of water has not drag. Also, by bending your low back to keep your hips high, solves problem with high stroke. The hip pull that you get with every high stroke is essential for fast breaststroke. Michael gets none by staying low. The whole mystery of breaststroke is that moment when you get up on your stroke to continue with seamless upper body shift forward and use gravity to work for you. You have to be born breaststroker to swim that way – you cannot teach that. That is why breaststrokers are born not made, and Michael is not. Kalisz is, for example.

o_O
2 years 5 months ago

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGfEGDWrDrY

Some people are going up higher and some staying lower. Gyurta is clearly not going the highest. I would think that the most important thing is the position of their body in the water because that is what is creating the resistance, not the air or gravity.

Ruta is a sprinter and a woman. Comparing her technique with Gyurta is like comparing Nathan Adrian’s freestyle to Katie Ledecky’s.

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

Physics has never been accused of sex discrimination.

o_O
2 years 5 months ago

I’m not sure what your sex discrimination comment has to do with anything, but I’ll explain what I meant using “physics”

This is from wikipedia so it may be inaccurate, but it illustrates my point just fine.
Ruta – 5’8″ 141lbs
Gyurta – 6’1″ 170lbs

They are different sized objects and that means they are going to encounter different amounts of resistance in different places. Women also have more body fat, this changes their buoyancy and dimensions at a given weight. Women also have different shaped bodies. Typically longer legs, wider hips, breasts, narrower shoulders, etc. etc. etc.

Beyond just the shape and weight of the swimmer, men can be significantly stronger than women at the same size. Throw an extra 30lbs of muscle in there and your talking about an entirely different boat with an entirely different motor.

Digging further into your misunderstanding of swimming and “physics”, men are different shapes/strengths/weights from other men. The same is true for women. They also have variations in their physiological systems, their physical dimensions, and their psychologies.

Why should everyone swim the same way? This isn’t synchronized swimming. All we want to know is who can get their hand(s) on the wall the fastest.

sven
2 years 5 months ago

Semantics here, but gravity is actually by far the weakest of the fundamental forces. Therefore, I propose a switch in priority to utilizing the strong nuclear force during breaststroke in order to maximize speed.

Srsly, tho, I believe the higher stroke is as valid as the lower stroke IF the athlete has the power in their stroke to maintain it. Staying low is clearly working for MA, and I’m not going to sit here and say he would be 52.8 if he got higher.

I think a few advantages to going higher, if it’s done correctly, are the hip slide (shoulders go up therefore hips slide forward) and a smoother transition from the insweep to recovery. I’ve found that, in my swimmers at least, my lower swimmers tend to have a pull that is closer to straight back, which makes the transition from backward to forward a little jerkier. It’s fixable, though. A low swimmer can have a smooth pull, I just don’t think it’s quite as inherent to the style. That said, I’ve had higher swimmers who tend to throw their elbows back too far, making them just as jerky.

I tend to think that as a swimmer’s pull and head position becomes more developed, a swimmer will go one way or the other. We tried to make a lower swimmer go high last season and he crashed and burned every time. At the end of the season we told him to just go out and race and he was back to his old best times. Maybe mental, or maybe each swimmer just needs to focus on doing everything else right and find out which body position works best for them during the breath.

2 years 5 months ago

“because then you use the most powerful force in nature to your advantage – gravity.”

That’s not free energy… please recheck your math. 🙂

SprintDude9000
2 years 5 months ago

Paul I was going to write the same thing – PSYCHODAD’s knowledge of basic physics is evidently sketchy at best…

Sven
2 years 5 months ago

You guys are idiots. Everyone knows Gravity is what holds the most fundamental particles of matter together and that it is the strongest force in nature. And yes, it is a proper noun. Acknowledge its power and respect it accordingly.

I actually went back and cross referenced every breaststroke world record since 1960 with local tidal charts, and 91% of WR’s since then have been set during the Perigean Tide of that particular location. It appears that breaststroke is strongly affected by the tidal pull of the moon.

@PsychoDad: I’m sorry for this, I can’t resist. I think this could be interpreted as being more mean spirited than I like to be here on SwimSwam, but I really do mean it in a tongue-in-cheek manner. I do agree that high breaststroke has advantages, but I think advantages can easily be seen in the lower stroke as well. I think it’s somewhat short-sighted to reject a 14 year old going 53.8 because he stays low. You can disagree all you want, but a kid that fast is clearly doing SOMETHING right and I think it’s unreasonable not to acknowledge that.

HISWIMCOACH
2 years 5 months ago

Psychodad (+1)

2 years 5 months ago

Heeeeeeeeee’s Baaaaaaaaaaaaaak.

All we needed to do was talk more breaststroke.

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

Not true., On my twitter account you name called because of backstroke this morning.

2 years 5 months ago

I didn’t name call, and it had nothing to do with backstroke. Sunday practices with dad was what got my interest.

ChestRockwell
2 years 5 months ago

Wait, people actually know who this guy is in real life? He runs his mouth like this and isn’t hiding in a cave somewhere? I always wondered why people on “Cops” agree to let their faces be shown, this is kinda like that.

aswimfan
2 years 5 months ago

I often disagreed with many of Psychodad’s points, but this is uncalled for.

ChestRockwell
2 years 5 months ago

Psychodad –

I don’t want to live in a world where someone who swims a 53.xx is considered “not a breaststroker.”

You are like the mutant offspring of Hydroglide and xxChrisxx from the collegeswimming forums.

sven
2 years 5 months ago

If breaststrokers are born, not made, and Michael Andrew was not born a breaststroker as Psychodad says, then he must be doing something right to be going 53.8. I don’t see how he supports his point with a saying that a 14 year old going that fast isn’t a natural and also isn’t doing it right.

I mean, you either have it, or you bust your ass to get it, right? He’s certainly got “it”, yet we’re supposed to believe that somehow he wasn’t born with “it” AND isn’t doing the right technical things to obtain “it” the hard way so… witchcraft? Invisible breaststroke fins? P2Life?

2 years 5 months ago

🙂

G
2 years 5 months ago

Maybe it’s Maybelline

GC
2 years 5 months ago

Come on Psycho Dad – I see you still active on this thread – answer the question. Which is it?

bobo gigi
2 years 5 months ago

Psychodad is back!
Even if he hasn’t always been very nice with me, I’m happy to see he’s still alive. 😆

Rafael
2 years 5 months ago

Bobo, you have a list or remember who posted of who was the fastest 14 year old ever? Remember lot of times from Hagino.

Scuba Steve
2 years 5 months ago

I have a 14 years list that I think is accurate (I have a top 10 for each of these that is less accurate)
50 Free 22.73 Lim
100 Free 50.86 Chalmers
200 Free 1:50.07 Thorpe
400 Free 3:49.64 Thorpe
800 Free 8:08.75 Pinion (suit), probably Jesse Vassallo split without a suit
1500 Free 15:31.03 Vassallo
100 Back 56.25 Hagino
200 Back 1:59.26 Hagino
100 Breast 1:02.39 Gyurta
200 Breast 2:13.63 Gyurta
100 Fly 53.18 Kobori
200 Fly 1:59.02 Phelps
200 IM 2:03.71 Hagino
400 IM 4:21.85 Hagino

aswimfan
2 years 5 months ago

Great stuff!

Thanks for the hard work!

aswimfan
2 years 5 months ago

So Michael Andrew does not have even one of fastest swims for 14 yo.

I wonder if he will do it in the 15 yo, which will be even harder when that is the age when Thorpe, Phelps, Gyurta became world champions or Olympics medalist and Hagino and Irie really shot up.

Rafael
2 years 5 months ago

I think hard..

Gyurta 200 Br, Thorpe 200/400 free and Phelps 200 Fly are probably unbeatable for a long long time.. the other must be pretty hard too

Steve Nolan
2 years 5 months ago

But I mean, he’s gotta be close-ish in most, no? His range is by far his most outstanding quality at this point.

2 years 5 months ago

Awesome… and why can’t FINA do this for the 18s? If (no offense) Scuba Steve can dig out 14 and unders… why can’t FINA figure out the 18 and unders?

Scuba Steve
2 years 5 months ago

I posted the 18 and unders somewhere else (here) last week if you’re interested Hulk

lane 0
2 years 5 months ago

Sorry, I missed some times. So Michael Andrew isn’t the fastest in the world in any LCM event for his age. Still pretty good. He’s the fastest in the US in many SCY events but that may be misleading due to the fact that Hagino, Gyurta, Thorpe didn’t swim yards and even Michael Phelps never swam yards seriously.

It takes better technique to be the best in LCM. Even the fastest college swimmers don’t always have the best technique.

sven
2 years 5 months ago

True, the above water swimming has to be a lot better to excel in long course. It’s a good sign for MA, then, as his DPS on most strokes is great and most people would agree his underwaters are his weakness.

MarkB
2 years 5 months ago

Part of it is birth dates. He ages up before the major long course season in the US so he would have had to make much of his 13-14 times as a 13 year old – pretty tough to do.

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

Bobo. Mon Cheri,

When “I was not very nice to you” it has always been a joke, result of me “hating French people.” You should have understood that as a joke – I noted that several times.

bobo gigi
2 years 5 months ago

No reason for you to hate us.
And no reason for us to hate you.
We have saved you with La Fayette against the English invasion in the 1770s and the 1780s.
You have saved us against the Nazi invasion in the World War II.

2 years 5 months ago

Serbia didn’t save France from the Nazi’s….

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

Well, we asked but they said “Nope, thanks, no need, we are good.” So….

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

Bobo, Mon petit cheri,

Again, misunderstanding… “Hating all French People” is a joke – I do not hate French people – I even ate french fries when Americans started calling then “Freedom Fries” (yeah, I know, Americans are dumb sometimes). I posted once that I hate French people same way Stephen Colbert hates bears, but I guess that joke was lost on your – local one I understand. Sorry.

PVK
2 years 5 months ago

Does anybody have a record of what Gyurta was going in the breaststrokes from the age of 12 on??? Am very curious to see how MA stacks up to his old times. Please someone answer 🙂

Scuba Steve
2 years 5 months ago

Gyurta at 14 was 1:02.39/2:13.63
at 15 was 2:10.80
at 16 was 2:10.75

That’s all I have

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

I just want someone to name ONE top level breaststroker in last 20 years that swam and won swimming low, the way Michael and Kevin Cordes do. Name just one! There is a reason that nobody at the international level swims that way. In USA, it is a “Soni effect” – Salo is destroying breaststroke in the USA with “stay low” crusade that everyone is so blindly following.

[Braden, this post is worth another 50 angry posts by “small penis” crowd of cartoon heros. and how do you repay me: by unfollowing me on the twitter. Nice touch].

sprintdude9000
2 years 5 months ago

Roman Sloudnov

sprintdude9000
2 years 5 months ago

Leisel Jones

MarkB
2 years 5 months ago

Penny Heyns – won both breaststrokes at 1996 Olympics – undulated but quite low.

ChestRockwell
2 years 5 months ago

Am I nuts or did you actually name a fairly successful breaststroker in your post?

2 years 5 months ago

Don’t worry psychodad… I still follow you on twitter.

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

I would miss you if you don’t anymore :). I posted my backstroke presentation few weeks ago – no attacks from you on that? I was expecting a bloodshed. I hope you incorporated all my “teachings” in your everyday practice. Love.

2 years 5 months ago

I must have been at a meet and missed it. Shucks.

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

Scroll down my tweets and you can find the link to download the file. Your (backstroke) life will never be the same 🙂

2 years 5 months ago

Sorry. I actually did go looking for it. But after reading your March 20th tweets I lost interest in anything you had to say.

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

What? My tweet/return in support of Down Syndrome day made you “lost interest in anything you had to say”. What am I missing?

2 years 5 months ago

March 20. March 21. Same thing, I guess.

GC
2 years 5 months ago

Classy Psycho Dad…very classy….

YouGotLezakd
2 years 5 months ago

PsychoDad, what is your twitter name? I am curious to see what you tweet…..

2 years 5 months ago

@psychoswimdad

YouGotLezakd
2 years 5 months ago

Thanks Hulk.

lane 0
2 years 5 months ago

sorry but Kevin Cordes is a very good breaststroker. And he doesn’t even stay low in the water really. He is a definite contender the the gold medal in Rio, maybe not the favorite but a contender.

HISWIMCOACH
2 years 5 months ago

Psychodad,

Maybe if you took a less dismissive tone (namely statements like “Salo is destroying breaststroke) you wouldn’t catch so much grief. I heard that in your neck of the woods there is a saying “there’s more than one way to skin a cat”. Breaststroke is similar. You make it sound like first place is awarded on how high someone can get out of the water and how pretty their stroke looks. Last I checked, the clock determines first place.
As a swim historian, I’m sure you’ll recall how bad people were dissing phelps and bowman for breathing every stroke in the fly and that seemed to work out quite well. Let’s just wait and see what Cordes/Andrew end up doing in their career before declaring they have major stroke defects.
I’ll leave you (and everyone else) with this. When I type in psychodad my phone keeps trying to autocorrect to psychosis. True story and I see very little irony in this. Peace out mr psycho D. My work is done. Hulk, keep on smashing in the free world.

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

Fair comments. Appreciate it (BTW, I am not here to make friends – I express my opinion without attacking anyone personally – except Salo 🙂 – and I am having fun doing it. Back to topic, how do you explain lack of breaststroke success of (young) USA swimmers on the international scene recently? I am also a USA swimming official and I watch endless stream of young girls trying to copy (unsuccessfully) Soni’s style. Clubs teach “look in front of you – stay low” breaststroke style, which again in my opinion is totally wrong. This is all result of Salo’s teaching and Soni’s success, which will not be repeated any time soon.

>As a swim historian, I’m sure you’ll recall how bad people were dissing phelps and bowman
>for breathing every stroke in the fly and that seemed to work out quite well.

Well it does not, for that matter… Phelps was a phenomenon, and Soni was too. What works for them does not work for most of others. I still do not think breathing every stroke in fly is good, and lack of great young fly talents in USA confirms that as well. Swimming should not be all about “latest trend” (like good people in NFL do copying each other every season) – it should be about physics primarily and then about specific swimmer’s mental and physical makeup.

sven
2 years 5 months ago

Breathing every stroke on the fly is something that only works for Phelps?

In London, 4 out of the 8 swimmers in the mens 100 fly final breathed every stroke. Three of those four filled up the podium. Michael Andrew, the fastest 14 year old flyer so far in American history, breathes every stroke. This is not a passing trend.

In the 200 fly in London, 7 of 8 swimmers in the men’s 200 fly final breathed every stroke.

From personal experience, I can say that if you learn the technique (bigger second kick, press chin forward, let head rise with shoulders instead of forcing the breath early), it’s just as fast while allowing more oxygen. Yes, Phelps is a freakshow, but another reason he’s able to back half the crap out of the 100 fly is because the extra oxygen on the first half of the race let him finish stronger on the last half.

And as for this perceived lack of young fly talent… Well that’s just silly.

GC
2 years 5 months ago

I do not like Psycho Dad. He is arrogent, a name caller, is dismissive about one of the the most successful coaches in american history (Salo), he part time coaches his kids and rips on his own kids programs. It just isn’t fun reading him. This is my opinion…

An above poster did point out he isn’t anonymous – even I know his name and what club he swims for…it makes me wonder if his club is thrilled about him posting how he has to personally clean up his kids bad habits. Would they like hearing that? It seems disrespectful to the coaches that put in so many hours to make his kids better and/or makes him look foolish for “wasting” his money on something he always has to fix. Chill Psycho Dad. Just chill.

Rafael
2 years 5 months ago

One of the most sucessful coaches and probably the guy who more swimmers under his tutelage got in doping problems and I wonder why no one ever tried to make a in depth check of WHY so many dopers with Salo..

GC
2 years 5 months ago

Rafael – substantiate your claims or go away. Do you have ANY proof. ANYTHING at all. No…no you don’t.

P.s. this is about psycho dad – don’t go down this rode…

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

I never commented on Salo graduate swimmers doping or blaming him for that. I do not blame him for “destroying USA breaststroke” either. I blame everyone else for blindly following his teachings without using thinking.

Rafael
2 years 5 months ago

I never said that was his fault.. but the dopers were His swimmers under his tutelage.. If he was a coach FROM any other country I doubt you would react like that.. as if doing a investigation was something awful..

GC
2 years 5 months ago

Yes, .0001 percent of Salo’s swimmers have failed a drug test with ZERO implications, evidence or rumbling…. call the cops…get the crime lab involved….
come on dude…..

PsychoDad
2 years 5 months ago

“Salo destroying breaststroke” is a Hyperbole and should be understood that way. It is meant to mean “Salo style of breaststroke.”

Now, let’s review the state of USA swimming. USA is doing very good in freestyle and backstroke, but not near as good in butterfly and breaststroke. Why? because of two dominant teachings in past decade: Bowman’s fly and Salo’s breaststroke, and everyone following them. They developed style they believed is best for their top athletes (Phelps and Soni). Does not work for 99% of others. Why is everything trying to copy it? That is what bothers me.

Now, I expect more name calling and stupid knee jerk reactions instead of intelligent discussion, not very often found here.

sven
2 years 5 months ago

Hey, I agree that we should use intellegent discussion here, so how about you respond to my post above regarding butterfly? I feel I was very reasonable and used examples that include the best swimmers in the world at the biggest meet in the world. If it doesn’t work for 99% of the other swimmers, how did they make it to an Olympic final doing it? As underwaters get longer and top speed gets closer to the theoretical max, the only way to get faster is to get more oxygen the first half so you can extend that speed for longer.

If you’re suggesting that the majority of elite butterfliers in the world made the finals of the 100 and 200 events at the Olympics DESPITE breathing every stroke, then I strongly suggest you re-educate yourself on the mechanics of the stroke and then take a step back to examine your biases.

I’ll say this again: with a bigger second kick, solid head position, and allowing the head to rise and fall with the shoulders, you can breathe every stroke without compromising speed. The only thing that changes is the stroke requires a bit more conditioning in the quads to handle the second kick, but this can be adapted to if you train that way (as the best in the world have shown).

sven
2 years 5 months ago

To further illustrate my point, looking at the men’s 100 fly splits, not only was every medalist breathing every stroke, but you can see why in the splits.

Every stroke:
Phelps 2.51s spread between first and second 50
Le Clos 2.54s
Korotyshkin 3.28s
McGill 3.54s

Average spread of 2.97s, average place of 2.75 (counting the tie for second, which is offset below by the tie for fourth)

other breathing pattern (generally 1 up, 1 down or 2 up, 1 down):
Cavic 4.67s
Diebler 4.21s
Verlinden 3.24s
Czerniak 4.23s

Average spread of 4.09s, average place of 5.5

2 years 5 months ago

Sven, you are clouding the argument with facts. Cut it out.

Listen, it can all be resolved very simply, by asking yourself this one little question:

Is that how The Greatest Coach Who Ever Has Or Ever Will Grace A Pool Deck Eddie Reese would teach it? If the answer is no, then it is wrong. Period.

(Wow, I feel really bad about dragging Eddie- who I really, really like into this… but @psychoswimdad ‘s infatuation with him is too funny).

sven
2 years 5 months ago

Consider me smashed. It’s like Thor lent the great hammer Mjolnir to his angry green friend 🙁

I’m also a big fan of Eddie Reese, he gave us some of the greatest stroke swimmers of the 2000’s in Hansen, Piersol, and Crocker (plus many more). The man has gotten results, no doubt. As a former flyer, I have to say Ian Crocker is one of my favorite swimmers, since for a while he was one of the only swimmers who could beat Phelps in one of his specialty races.

And so, I concede defeat. I will pack up my real world examples with my knowledge of stroke mechanics and trudge home in shame, and from this day forth I solemnly swear to train my swimmers to swim butterfly entirely without breathing, save a quick one during the turns (I’m a big ol’ softie).

HISWIMCOACH
2 years 5 months ago

Psychodad,
Please correct me anywhere I’m wrong here:
1) Salo/Soni destroyed breaststroke
2) Phelps/Bowman destroyed butterfly
3) Janet Evans destroyed freestyle
4) Berkoff destroyed backstroke (Eddie Reese and Peirsol later saved it, but oh wait, Peirsol set his first WR’s under Salo??)
5) Don Schwartz destroyed training (why would we want to do periodization, let’s just swim as many yards as possible all the time)

Did I get those things correct?

2 years 5 months ago

I think so.

wpDiscuz

About Gold Medal Mel Stewart

Gold Medal Mel Stewart

MEL STEWART Jr., aka Gold Medal Mel, won three Olympic medals at the 1992 Olympic Games. Mel's best event was the 200 butterfly. He is a former World, American, and NCAA Record holder in the 200 butterfly. As a writer/producer and sports columnist, Mel has contributed to Yahoo Sports, Universal Sports, …

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