Ivy League Cancels All Spring Sports; Harvard Out of NCAA Swim/Dive

The Ivy League has just announced that they will be cancelling all sporting events that are currently scheduled for the spring of 2020. The NCAA Division I conference, made up of Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Penn, Princeton and Yale came to a unanimous decision made by the presidents of each school.

The swim season for some Ivy League schools wrapped up last month with the women’s and men’s conference championship meets. But with women’s NCAAs next week and men’s NCAAs a week after that, it’s now up to individual schools whether they will compete or not. Harvard specifically noted that it will “cancel all winter postseason play,” which means Harvard swimmers and divers will not compete at NCAAs.

Harvard had qualified three women and four men for NCAAs in swimming, plus three women’s divers:

Other Ivy League schools with swimmers invited include Columbia (Albert Gwo), Penn (Catherine Buroker) and Princeton (Ellie Marquardt, Raunak Khosla). Diving invites are also now set, and the Ivy League was also set to qualify divers from Princeton (Mimi Lin, Charlie Minns, Colten Young), Dartmouth (Justin Sodokoff), Cornell (Brett Hebert), and Yale (Christian DeVol). There has been no official word on whether those schools will attend NCAAs.

Update: Princeton’s coaching staff says they will still attend NCAAs for both men and women.

Update: A Cornell spokesperson says they are also still set to compete, as of now. That leaves Columbia, Penn, Dartmouth, and Yale still up in the air.

This decision builds on Tuesday’s call to cancel both the men’s and women’s four-team basketball tournaments. The tournaments were set to be held at Harvard’s Lavietes Pavilion in Cambridge, Massachusetts. As a result, the Princeton women and Yale men have been given the conferences NCAA bids, based on regular season results.

Also cancelled were the men’s and women’s hockey tournaments that were scheduled for this weekend.

Robin Harris, Executive Director of the Ivy League said of the situation “Regrettably, the information and recommendations presented to us from public health authorities and medical professionals have convinced us that this is the most prudent decision”

The Ivy League is based out of the Eastern United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control, here are the number of reported cases in each state housing an Ivy League school:

  • New York (Columbia, Cornell): 173
  • Massachusetts (Harvard): 91
  • New Jersey (Princeton): 15
  • Pennsylvania (Penn): 12
  • Connecticut (Yale): 1 to 5
  • Rhode Island (Brown): 1 to 5
  • New Hampshire (Dartmouth): 1 to 5

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Wow
1 year ago

Wow.

BSD
1 year ago

Good thing Dean took his redshirt this year

PowerPlay
Reply to  BSD
1 year ago

Dean knew . . .

gator
Reply to  PowerPlay
1 year ago

unfortunately all the guys that competed this year lose this year eligibility and a chance at NCAAs. Spring Sports is a separate matter, but not allowing them to compete in NCAA swimming, which is apparently going to be held just doesn’t make any sense. They can sign a waiver. Indy is drivable. unclear thinking in my view.

SwimUSA
Reply to  gator
1 year ago

Not that it matters for the vast majority of the 4-year guys who will graduate and move on to other things; but I would think they could petition to have NCAA eligibility reinstated for an additional year. This isn’t a football season where they got to play 11 of 12 games and had one cancelled. This is the whole song and dance for the guys that made it.

To be clear – I am in support of preventative measures such as this. Public welfare trumps all in this situation. But I feel for the guys who bled for this and can’t go now.

Eagleswim
Reply to  gator
1 year ago

what do you think a waiver would solve? The problem is them going to an event like this and then returning to campus to spread it among students. The waiver doesn’t protect against that

Swimmom
Reply to  Eagleswim
1 year ago

They are not going back to Campus. Told to go home until classesresume . Will be doing online.

Swim Pop
Reply to  gator
1 year ago

Unattached??? Only slightly kidding

Coach Chackett
Reply to  BSD
1 year ago

Dean Farris will cure Coronavirus in ALL

joe
1 year ago

Bummer for Harvard. Brings in Ho (STAN), Liang (STAN), Wilby (UK), and Dimitriou (UNC) off the alternates list for men, and Curry (ASU), Coffey (NEB), and Janvier (USC) off for women.

Snarky
Reply to  joe
1 year ago

Stanford usually follows Harvard. They will pull their athletes at the last minute and the fUVA women will win NCAAS and we will have endure more annoying Descorbo Affect posts!

Wahooswimfan
1 year ago

This is a bit too extreme, everyone is panicking too much. Just slow down, exercise good hygiene habits as instructed. The only folks who really need to do further isolation are old folks (like me) who are past age 60. No reason for the entire world to stop for those of use who are susceptible to more than a cold type disease. Just stay away from us and we will stay away from you. .

PVSFree
Reply to  Wahooswimfan
1 year ago

I said this in the YNats article comment section, but I’ll say it here too. No one wants to be held liable if someone contracts the virus at their event and dies.

It’s more than a “cold type disease” as well; hospitals in northern Italy are completely overrun with the virus. In just a week the virus has quadrupled in magnitude, going from 2,500 patients to over 10,000. 132/150 of the hospitals in the region are solely dedicated to the virus. Doctors are having to make decisions on which patients to treat (effectively choosing who lives and who dies) multiple times a day. They’re promoting med students early. Medical workers need to keep working even when they’re exhibiting symptoms… Read more »

goggles123
Reply to  PVSFree
1 year ago

Piggybacking on PVSFREE comment because I agree with most of it but take exception to one part.

It’s not about liability. It’s about slowing the rate of spread. It’s all well and good if you are not part of the high-risk group (not you PVSFREE; but all the other commenters here claiming they have strong immune systems and are under 60 and whatever else). Congrats, you probably won’t die. But you can also be a carrier and contribute to infecting people who ARE at high risk and MIGHT die.

The mortality rate of this is unknown but looks extremely high. The rate of infection is high. Previous containment efforts have failed.

Every single event and large gathering increases… Read more »

SwimFan49
Reply to  goggles123
1 year ago

“The mortality rate of this is unknown but looks extremely high.”

Not sure I agree with this, or at least any sort of conclusion it’s high. Currently in the denominator for that are only people who have been confirmed positive. There are tons of others out there believed to have had either mild or no symptoms – they aren’t included, so the only rational conclusion to draw is that the mortality rate is significantly lower than anything based simply on confirmed cases.

Cate
Reply to  SwimFan49
1 year ago

“Than anything..”? Anything what? Johns Hopkins will give you the mortality rate.

SWIMGUY12345
Reply to  PVSFree
1 year ago

Promoting med students early? Any talk of loan forgiveness?

You hate to see something like this happen…BUT…as a med student in hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt…SEND ME TO THE FRONT LINES IF YOU’LL FORGIVE MY LOANS.

Anonymous
Reply to  Wahooswimfan
1 year ago

I think a pool might be the safest place to be. But I’m just a lowly microbiologist.

Nick
Reply to  Anonymous
1 year ago

How about the locker rooms, the hotel rooms, and the stands?

Cate
Reply to  Anonymous
1 year ago

Locker rooms, team meetings, the stands at meets?

Cate
Reply to  Wahooswimfan
1 year ago

Uh, no. That’s not how this works. This is a novel virus. No vaccine no treatment. You have to limit crowd exposure. You don’t know who is a carrier or who will get sick. Not all that died were over 60. One was a 40 yr old cop. You don’t know how sick someone will get. Studies have shown there may be some permanent lung damage in some cases.

Hint of Lime
1 year ago

“Good” thing that most of the affected Ivy swimmers are not seniors, so they’ll have a shot to qualify and swim again next year, but I imagine this is a bummer for Dahlke. Dang!

PowerPlay
1 year ago

Wouldn’t be surprised if NCAAs get canceled. This is moving very fast.

Admin
Reply to  PowerPlay
1 year ago

I would still be surprised if NCAAs got cancelled.

Meeeeeee
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 year ago

Maybe a virtual meet. Swim event in own pool and send in times.

PowerPlay
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 year ago

NBA just suspended the rest of the season. This is moving very fast.

Snarky
Reply to  PowerPlay
1 year ago

Well. The nba only mKe money when people show up. Not so true for swimming.

Admin
Reply to  Snarky
1 year ago

The NBA still makes money with nobody in the stands. TV revenue dwarfs stadium revenue.

A famous NBA player tested positive for coronavirus. That was the impetus for the suspension of the season.

Eagleswim
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 year ago

You think they’re making tv revenue with no games?

curiousfan
1 year ago

Any confirmation on the alternates officially getting in?

Admin
Reply to  curiousfan
1 year ago

Not yet.

Don't stand so close to me
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 year ago

Alternates are in.

RolyPoly
1 year ago

Will they re seed the invoice lists or use alternates?

Admin
Reply to  RolyPoly
1 year ago

My educated guess is use alternates, because they shouldn’t change the procedure based on ‘the reason why someone pulls out of the meet.’ This is uncharted territory, though.

Reply to  RolyPoly
1 year ago

Given that these scratches appear to be coming after the invites were already officialized, it appears the NCAA would use alternates.