2024 ACC Championships: Day 2 Ups/Mids/Downs

Yanyan Li
by Yanyan Li 9

February 21st, 2024 ACC, College, National, News

2024 ACC SWIMMING AND DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

For those unfamiliar with swimming terminology, the concept of “Ups” and “Downs” is a good way to track which teams performed best at prelims. In prelims, swimmers qualify for one of three finals heats: the top 8 finishers make the A final, places 9 through 16 the B final and places 17 through 24 the C final. In finals, swimmers are locked into their respective final, meaning a swimmer in the B heat (spots 9-16) can only place as high as 9th or as low as 16th, even if they put up the fastest or slowest time of any heat in the final.

With that in mind, we’ll be tracking “Ups,” “Mids” and “Downs” after each prelims session. “Up” refers to swimmers in the A final, “Mid” to swimmers in the B final and “Down” to swimmers in the C final.

These results do not currently include diving events, but will be updated to include them later.

Team Scores — Thru Day 1

Women:

  1. North Carolina – 159
  2. Louisville – 155
  3. Virginia – 154
  4. NC State – 144
  5. Duke – 142
  6. Notre Dame – 139
  7. Florida State – 128
  8. Virginia Tech – 115
  9. Miami – 96
  10. (TIE) Pitt/Georgia Tech – 85

Men:

  1. Notre Dame – 176
  2. NC State – 159
  3. Pitt – 151
  4. UNC – 138
  5. Florida State – 132
  6. Virginia Tech – 124.5
  7. Louisville /Georgia Tech – 114
  8. (tie)
  9. Duke – 88
  10. Miami (FL) – 54
  11. Virginia – 53.5

At the end of day one, neither team favored to win came out on top (the Virginia women and NC State men), with results from diving heavily influencing day one scores. This comes despite the UVA women sweeping the day one relays, while the NC State men claimed the 200 medley relay.

Headed into day 2 finals, the UNC women lead by four, while the Notre Dame men—propelled by two top eight finishers in the one-meter diving event and an 800 free relay win—hold a 17 point lead over NC State.

Day 3 Ups/Mids/Downs — Women

Credit to Andrew Mering for running the numbers.

All 500 Free 200 IM 50 Free 1 mtr Diving
Virginia 10/2/1 4/0/0 3/2/1 3/0/0 0/0/0
NC State 5/5/1 3/1/1 1/2/0 1/2/0 0/0/0
Louisville 5/4/5 0/2/2 2/0/2 3/2/1 0/0/0
Duke 2/3/1 0/1/0 2/1/0 0/1/1 0/0/0
Virginia Tech 1/3/1 1/0/1 0/1/0 0/2/0 0/0/0
Pitt 1/1/0 0/0/0 0/1/0 1/0/0 0/0/0
UNC 0/3/5 0/1/1 0/1/3 0/1/1 0/0/0
Notre Dame 0/2/4 0/2/2 0/0/0 0/0/2 0/0/0
Miami 0/2/1 0/1/1 0/0/0 0/1/0 0/0/0
Georgia Tech 0/0/3 0/0/0 0/0/2 0/0/1 0/0/0
Florida St 0/0/1 0/0/0 0/0/0 0/0/1 0/0/0

Scored Prelims — Women

  1. Virginia — 314.0
  2. Louisville — 211.0
  3. NC State — 192.0
  4. Duke — 108.0
  5. Virginia Tech — 66.0
  6. North Carolina — 61.0
  7. Notre Dame — 54.0
  8. Pitt — 33.0
  9. Miami — 29.0
  10. Georgia Tech — 16.0
  11. Florida State — 2.0

Day 2 Scores + Prelim Projections — Women

  1. Virginia — 468.0
  2. Louisville — 366.0
  3. NC State — 335.0
  4. Duke — 250.0
  5. North Carolina — 220.0
  6. Notre Dame — 193.0
  7. Virginia Tech — 182.0
  8. Florida St — 130.0
  9. Miami — 125.0
  10. Pitt — 118.0
  11. Georgia Tech — 101.0

The UVA women have established control over this meet early, putting ten swimmers in the ‘A’ finals — twice as many swimmers as any other team. If finals go the way that prelims did, the Cavaliers should end the night with a lead of over 100 points. Meanwhile, the battle between NC State and Louisville for second is going just as expected, with the Cardinals being in the position to establish a lead over the Wolfpack early. Last year, Louisville led NC State for the majority of the meet, but the latter team was able to pull through and claim second place on the final day of the meet.

Day 3 Ups/Mids/Downs — Men

Credit to Andrew Mering for running the numbers.

All 500 Free 200 IM 50 Free 1 mtr Diving
NC State 10/3/0 4/0/0 3/0/0 3/3/0 0/0/0
VA Tech 4/1/2 1/1/0 1/0/1 2/0/1 0/0/0
Virginia 3/3/4 0/1/1 2/0/3 1/2/0 0/0/0
Notre Dame 3/2/1 0/1/1 1/1/0 2/0/0 0/0/0
Louisville 2/5/3 2/3/0 0/1/1 0/1/2 0/0/0
Florida St 1/5/3 0/1/1 1/2/0 0/2/2 0/0/0
Georgia Tech 1/3/2 1/1/1 0/2/0 0/0/1 0/0/0
North Carolina 0/2/3 0/0/1 0/2/2 0/0/0 0/0/0
Pitt 0/1/4 0/0/2 0/0/1 0/1/1 0/0/0
Duke 0/0/1 0/0/1 0/0/0 0/0/0 0/0/0

Scored Prelims — Men

  1. NC State — 305.0
  2. Virginia — 145.0
  3. Louisville — 144.0
  4. Virginia Tech — 122.0
  5. Florida State — 111.5
  6. Notre Dame — 111.0
  7. Georgia Tech — 77.5
  8. North Carolina — 37.0
  9. Pitt — 32.0
  10. Duke — 4.0

Day 2 Scores + Prelim Projections — Men

  1. NC State — 464.0
  2. Notre Dame — 286.0
  3. Louisville — 258.0
  4. Virginia Tech — 246.5
  5. Florida State — 240.5
  6. Virginia — 199.5
  7. Georgia Tech — 191.5
  8. Pitt — 183.0
  9. North Carolina — 175.0
  10. Duke — 92.0
  11. Miami — 54.0

The NC State men were even more dominant than the Virginia women this morning, and are expected to take a near-200 point lead at the end of day three based on prelim projections. Notre Dame is projected to end the day in second and build off its day one performance, but teams like Louisville, Virginia Tech, Florida State and Virginia will be creeping up.

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Chuck
1 month ago

I really don’t get the use of these terms. It doesn’t add any clarity. Why not just call them “A’s” “B’s” and “C’s”? At best, it is just using another word to say the same thing. At worst, you are referring to swimmers who qualify for an evening swim as “down,” as if they achieved a poor result. The fact that every one of these articles begins with an explanation of these adopted terms means that it is contrived. For what it is worth, I like an article that compares the number of evening swims for each team. It helps to get an idea of scoring potentials in team scoring. I just do not like the terms used.

RealSlimThomas
Reply to  Chuck
1 month ago

At worst, referring to it as a ‘C-final’ implies they’ve scored around a 75% for the swim. While it is a passing achievement, it’s not highly regarded.

Purely sarcastic but I’m proving a point. Nobody thinks about up/mid/down the way you think they do.

Not-so-silent Observer
1 month ago

Another interesting stat would be to show how many swims each team used that session.

Like uva women used 13 swims, got 13 finals swims.
NCS women used 14 swims, got 11 finals swims.

Aka showing which teams are getting the most scoring potential out of their full conference rosters.

Helps tell the story, Imo, of who has miss in the tank vs who’s running out of room to make any more moves in the rankings.
Each team that brings a full roster of 18 athletes gets the same total number of swims for the overall meet. 18 x 3 individuals = 54 total swims (not including the maximum 4 relay swims per athlete)

SwimCoach
Reply to  Not-so-silent Observer
1 month ago

Really good point!

Mike Vick no dogs
Reply to  Not-so-silent Observer
1 month ago

This would be interesting, I would love to see something like this be implemented. Reminds me of the 2007 Northwestern NCAA men’s squad that was outscoring full rosters of swimmers while having a fraction of the athletes.

Andrew
1 month ago

UVA so poverty but props to sergile for getting a lane in A final with a solid swim

I miss the ISL
1 month ago

Are yall going to do this for every power 5 conference champ every day after prelims? If so, THANK YOU

IU Swammer
Reply to  I miss the ISL
1 month ago

They usually do. It gets crowded, so sometimes they miss one here and there. They do great work.

Swimpop
1 month ago

This just reminds me how much more fun this meet will be next year teamwise. At least we get to see the tip of the spear with so many great individual swims.

About Yanyan Li

Yanyan Li

Although Yanyan wasn't the greatest competitive swimmer, she learned more about the sport of swimming by being her high school swim team's manager for four years. She eventually ventured into the realm of writing and joined SwimSwam in January 2022, where she hopes to contribute to and learn more about …

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