2022 Australian Trials: Day 1 Finals Live Recap

2022 AUSTRALIAN SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

We’ve arrived at the first finals session of the 2022 Australian Swimming Championships. Night 1 will begin with the men’s 400 freestyle, in which Elijah Winnington will attempt to fend off the field. Winnington posted a 3:46.83 during prelims to get under the FINA A cut.

Samuel Short was also under that cut with a 3:47.13, followed by Mack Horton in 3rd with a 3:48.92. After the 400 freestyle, it’s the women’s 100 breast, men’s 100 fly, women’s 100 free, men’s 200 backstroke, men’s 50 freestyle, and women’s 800 free.

MEN’S 400 FREE – FINAL

  • World Record: Paul Biedermann – 3:40.07 (2009)
  • World Junior Record: Mack Horton 3:44.60 (2014)
  • Australian Record: Ian Thorpe – 3:40.08 (2002)
  • Commonwealth Record: Ian Thorpe – 3:40.08 (2002)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 3:48.15

Top 3:

  1. Elijah Winnington – 3:43.10
  2. Mack Horton – 3:44.06
  3. Samuel Short – 3:44.34

Elijah Winnington, the top seed out of the prelims, held onto his #1 position in the men’s 400 freestyle with a winning time of 3:43.10. Not only was that more than 3 seconds better than his prelims time of 3:46.83, but it also makes Winnington the 2nd-fastest man in the world this season behind Germany’s Lukas Martens who hit a 3:41.60 in April.

This swim was near a personal best time for Winnington whose PB is a 3:42.65 from last year’s Olympic Trials. Winnington qualified for Tokyo 2020 and placed 7th overall in this event.

Mack Horton, the 2016 Olympic champion in the 400, did not qualify for the Tokyo Olympics when he placed 3rd at Trials. He made will make a return to the team this year, however, now that he’s placed 2nd at Trials with a 3:44.06. Horton’s PB is a 3:41.55 from when he won gold in Rio.

Samuel Short was nearly quick enough to make the team and got well under the FINA A cut here. Short swam a 3:44.34, which was just slower than Horton and gets his PB down from a 3:54.33 from last year.

Brendon Smith, the Olympic medalist in the 400 IM, was the 4th man under the FINA A when he touched in a 3:47.95. Joshua Staples rounded out the top 5 in a 3:50.07.

WOMEN’S 100 BREAST – FINAL

  • World Record: Lily King – 1:04.13 (2017)
  • World Junior Record: Rūta Meilutytė – 1:04.35 (2013)
  • Australian Record: Leisel Jones – 1:05.09 (2006)
  • Commonwealth Record: Tatjana Schoenmaker – 1:04.82 (2021)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 1:07.43

Top 3:

  1. Jenna Strauch – 1:06.69
  2. Abbey Harkin – 1:06.88
  3. Chelsea Hodges – 1:06.94

In the second event of the session, an intense battle broke out between the top 3 women in the 100 breaststroke. Olympian Chelsea Hodges was first at the 50, splitting a 30.85, and was followed by Jenna Strauch (31.16) and Abbey Harkin (31.77) at the half.

On the second leg, not only was Strauch able to run down Hodges but Harkin did it too. The two overtook Hodges and went 1-2 in this event with a 1:06.69 and 1:06.88, respectively. All 3 of the top finishers here were under both the FINA A cut (1:07.43), meaning Strauch and Harkin will likely get the nod for the team.

That leaves Olympic semi-finalist Chelsea Hodges, who has been a 1:05.99 before, off the Worlds team this summer. Hodges split a 1:05.57 during the medley relay in Tokyo to help the Australian women to gold in the 4×100 medley relay.

While Strauch had been as fast as a 1:06.37 before this meet, Harkin’s former PB was a 1:07.02. The duo will now likely replace Hodges and Tokyo Olympian Jessica Hansen as the 100 breaststrokers for Australia this summer.

MEN’S 100 FLY – FINAL

  • World Record: Caeleb Dressel – 49.45 (2021)
  • World Junior Record: Kristof Milak – 50.62 (2017)
  • Australian Record: Matthew Temple – 50.45 (2021)
  • Commonwealth Record: Joseph Schooling – 50.39 (2016)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 51.96

Top 3:

  1. Matthew Temple – 51.50
  2. Kyle Chalmers – 51.67
  3. Cody Simpson – 51.96

Two-time Olympic medalist in the 4×100 freestyle and mixed 4×100 medley relay Matthew Temple had the winning time in the men’s 100 butterfly with a 51.50. That will likely be enough to get him onto the Worlds team this summer as he undercut the 51.96 FINA A. Last summer he swam at Tokyo individually in this event and tied Jakub Majerski for 5th in the final.

The race for second place came down to 100 freestyle Olympic champion Kyle Chalmers and Cody Simpson, who were separated by just 0.01 seconds at the 50. Chalmers turned at a 24.16, Simpson a 24.17.

Chalmers has enough closing speed to out-pace Simpson here and the 2 of them went 2-3 in a 51.67 and 51.96, respectively. Notably, Simpson swam exactly on the FINA A cut in this event. Chalmers has said that he won’t be racing at World Championships this summer, meaning that if he declines an invitation based on the top 2 finish, Simpson could wind up getting the nomination instead.

Simpson swam under the FINA A during prelims with a 51.79, which brought him under 52 seconds for the first time.

The battle for 4th place was live between all 5 of the other men in the final with Bowen Gough (4th) and Jesse Coleman (8th) touching just 0.35 seconds apart. Gough was a 52.35, followed by Ben Armbruster (52.41), David Morgan (52.61), Shaun Champion (52.67), and, finally, Coleman (52.70).

WOMEN’S 100 FREE – FINAL

  • World Record: Sarah Sjostrom – 51.71 (2017)
  • World Junior Record: Penny Oleksiak – 52.70 (2016)
  • Australian Record: Emma McKeon – 51.96 (2021)
  • Commonwealth Record: Emma McKeon – 51.96 (2021)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 54.25

Top 3:

  1. Mollie O’Callaghan – 52.49
  2. Shayna Jack – 52.60
  3. Meg Harris – 53.09

Mollie O’Callaghan brought her speed from the morning (52.83) into the final of the women’s 100 freestyle and posted another season-best of 52.49 to claim a spot on the World Championships roster. This time from O’Callaghan is the fastest swim in the world this year and gets her well under the 54.25 FINA A.

Coming into this meet, her PB in the event was a 53.08 from a relay leadoff at the Olympics. What’s notable about O’Callaghan’s swim is that is just a touch slower than what Emma McKeon posted at Australian Trials last year (52.35), and is faster than Cate Campbell’s 52.59 from that meet.

O’Callaghan has taken up the 100 free mantel in the absence of McKeon and the Campbell sisters and was followed by Shayna Jack who delivered a 52.60. Jack, formerly banned and now returned to the sport, hit a 52.60 to also get under the 53-second barrier, and FINA A cut. This is a new PB for Jack and improves upon her morning swim of 53.27.

Jack will also get onto the team here, marking an official comeback for her after missing the 2019 World Championships and every major meet since then. O’Callaghan and Jack and now the top 2 swimmers in the world this season.

2021-2022 LCM Women 100 Free

2Shayna
Jack
AUS52.6003/18
3Sarah
Sjostrom
SWE52.8006/23
4Torri
Huske
USA52.9206/23
5Penny
Oleksiak
CAN52.9806/23
View Top 28»

Third place finisher Meg Harris was a 53.09 here to replace Sarah Sjostrom as the #3 swimmer in the world this year. Madi Wilson was 4th in a 53.19 and Ariarne Titmus, who won’t race at Worlds, placed 5th in a 53.68. Now with 4 women between 52.49 and 53.19, Australia looks like its still got the depth it needs without McKeon or the Campbells to put up a strong fight for yet another gold medal in the 4×100 free.

MEN’S 200 BACK – FINAL

  • World Record: Aaron Peirsol – 1:51.92 (2009)
  • World Junior Record: Kilment Kolesnikov – 1:55.14 (2017)
  • Australian Record: Mitch Larkin1:53.17 (2015)
  • Commonwealth Record: Mitch Larkin1:53.17 (2015)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 1:58.07

Top 3:

  1. Joshua Edwards-Smith – 1:56.71
  2. Mitch Larkin – 1:56.79
  3. Bradley Woodward – 1:57.38

Unlike most other events on day 1, no one swam under the FINA A cut during the prelims of the men’s 200 backstroke. That changed, however, once finals rolled around as 4 men managed to work their way under the 1:58.07 cut.

The charge was led by 19-year-old Joshua Edward-Smith who got the lead at the 50 and held onto it the entire way. Edwards-Smith opened the race with a 27.22, hit a 56.58 at the half, and then wound up finishing with a 1:56.71.

Prior to this meet, Edwards-Smith has a best time in this event from back in 2019 when he hit a 1:57.82. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, his fastest had been a 1:59.20 from Olympic Trials in 2021. He raced this event in 2019 at the World Junior Championships and placed 9th overall with a 2:00.13.

Joining Edwards-Smith, who has made his first-ever senior team will be Australian vet Mitch Larkin. Larkin has raced at many a World Championships meet at Olympic Games and won gold in this event at 2015 Worlds, along with silver at Rio 2016. Larkin holds the national record at a 1:53.17 from 2015.

His best time from the last few years is a 1:53.38 from April 2021, but he actually opted out of the 200 back at a high-level last summer. He will likely now have the option to race this event at Worlds.

Bradley Woodward and Ty Hartwell both swam quicker than the FINA A as well, hitting a 1:57.38 for 3th and a 1:57.65 for 4th, respectively.

MEN’S 50 FREE – FINAL

  • World Record: Cesar Cielo – 20.91 (2009)
  • World Junior Record: Michael Andrew – 21.75 (2017)
  • Australian Record: Ashley Callus – 21.19 (2009)
  • Commonwealth Record: Ben Proud – 21.11 (2018)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 22.18

Top 3:

  1. Thomas Nowakowski – 21.86
  2. Grayson Bell – 22.08
  3. Isaac Cooper – 22.33

Thomas Nowakowski burst into the lead in the men’s 50 freestyle and managed to power his way towards a first place finish with a 21.86. That swim from Nowakowski marks his first time under 22 seconds in this event and is quicker than the FINA A cut of 22.18. That means that he will likely nab a spot on the World Championships team this summer.

Nowakowski came into the meet with a PB more than half a second slower, a 22.53 from the 2021 Australian Olympic Trials where he finished in 8th place.

Also within the top 2 and under the qualifying standard, Grayson Bell hit a 22.08 for second place. He out-swam third-place finisher Isaac Cooper who notched a 22.33 to just miss a spot on the Worlds team.

Last year Cam McEvoy was the only man to qualify for the Olympic team in the 50 freestyle and he finished in 29th place at the Games with a 22.31.

Women’s 800 FREE – FINAL

  • World Record: Katie Ledecky – 8:04.79 (2016)
  • World Junior Record: Katie Ledecky – 8:11.00 (2014)
  • Australian Record: Ariarne Titmus – 8:13.83 (2021)
  • Commonwealth Record: Ariarne Titmus – 8:13.83 (2021)
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 8:37.90

The notably absent swimmer in this field was Olympic silver medalist and Australian/Commonwealth record-holder Ariarne Titmus. Titmus has been as fast as an 8:13.83 in this event but won’t be racing at Worlds this summer so she opted out of this event (and into the 100 freestyle).

In her place, Lani Pallister picked up the Trials victory, swimming an 8:17.77 to claim to top spot and most likely book herself a ticket to World Championships. The time was under the FINA A cut of 8:37.90 by just over 20 seconds.

Pallister established a new best time in this event, beating her 2019 swim of 8:22.49. That former PB from Pallister was a gold medal-winning swim at the 2019 World Junior Championships. The reigning world junior champion will come into Worlds as a medal contender as the #2 performer worldwide this year.

The only woman in the world who has been faster this season in Katie Ledecky who swam an 8:09.27 at US Trials.

2021-2022 LCM Women 800 Free

KatieUSA
Ledecky
06/24
8:08.04
2Li
Bingjie
CHN8:17.3909/25
3Leah
Smith
USA8:17.5204/26
4Lani
Pallister
AUS8:17.7705/18
5Ariarne
Titmus
AUS8:18.5903/04
View Top 26»

Kiah Melverton, who was Australia’s second entrant to Titmus at Tokyo 2020, looks like she also qualified for the team with her second-place swim of 8:22.64. That time is right above what she swam during her first-ever Olympic final where she placed 6th in an 8:22.25. Melverton was actually quicker during prelims, however, at the Olympics, having swum an 8:20.45.

Moesha Johnson, Jamie Perkins, and Madeleine Gough were all under the FINA A cut as well, hitting an 8:26.35, 8:30.03, and 8:30.17, respectively.

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Petriasfan
1 month ago

About time! First AR in a women’s breaststroke event since 2009. Woo hoo! Go Hodges

Fraser Thorpe
1 month ago

The trash talking here is getting really gross. Save it for swimming world. Playful ribbing is one thing but this is embarrassing. Get some perspective.

Yozhik
1 month ago

As Ariarne Titmus said after Tokyo – the hunter is becoming hunted. Look how tensely she was watching Lani Pallister’s race and she was second in the line waiting when her coach finishes finally hugging Shayna Jack. She got used already to more attention.
Well 53.6 is promising a good result in 200 and then it may happen to be your day.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Yozhik
1 month ago

Huh?

Australia has not won the women’s 800 meter freestyle at a major international tournament (World Championships, Summer Olympics) in this century.

Yozhik
Reply to  Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
1 month ago

Lani Pallister won Australian Championships today and is officially #1 in the Nation at 800.
Yes, her personal best is slower than Titmus’ one, but who cares. The title is the title. Who cared that Titmus had slower personal best than Ledecky when she won Olympic gold medal? Medal is the medal.
And btw Lani swam very nice race today and I absolutely not sure if Titmus finishes first should she compete today.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Yozhik
1 month ago

It’s trials.

The medals that really matter are the ones distributed at the World Championships and Summer Olympics.

Yozhik
1 month ago

I like how this meet is presented so far. And most of it I like how on-deck interviews were conducted. There is nothing like the same empty question to any swimmer: “ what was in your mind when you made last turn?” or something like this.

Yozhik
1 month ago

Well, Australian Grands in W100FR may regret of skipping World Championships this year. They may have no more in their careers.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Yozhik
1 month ago

The Aussies have been known to swap out all four swimmers from the heats of the women’s freestyle relays.

Petriasfan
Reply to  Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
1 month ago

I’d say, we (Aussies) typically only sub in 2 new swimmers for the 4×100 Free final. At Rio Olympics, we only subbed McKeon into the final. Tokyo – C1 and McKeon were subbed in. World Champs-C2 and McKeon were subbed into 2017 final and McKeon into 2019 final. Four new swimmers raced the Tokyo final of the 4x200m free.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Petriasfan
1 month ago

What about the 2012 Summer Olympics (women’s 4 x 200 meter freestyle relay)?

ICU
1 month ago

Aussie Trials > US Trials

We are going to smash the US 4×100 women like guitars 👊🏻 🎸

Swimfan
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

Same thing happened in Beijing with the French said the same thing about Phelps company and look what happened 😎

Sub13
Reply to  Swimfan
1 month ago

Ummm. You know who the “smash them like guitars” quote is from, right? The irony lol

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

As if the USA was bragging about a bronze medal in the women’s 4 x 100 meter freestyle relay at the Tokyo 2021 Olympics. The USA better watch out, the Chinese women have a resurgence in freestyle sprinting which was never more evident in the women’s 4 x 200 meter freestyle relay.

ICU
Reply to  Swimfan
1 month ago

don’t make me laugh… you americans are so arrogant… let’s do the number crunching, facts don’t care about your feelings:

Australia:

Mollie 52.49
Shayna 52.60
Meg 53.09
Maddi 53.16

= 211.34

USA:

It is literally impossible for USA to win, plus we are a much smaller nation

Weitzeil 52.99
Huske 53.35
Brown 53.51
Curzan 53.55

= 213.4

Your 100m freestylers are laughably slow compared to ours hahahaha, plus we are a much smaller nation. It is literally impossible for us to loose. sorry 2008 Beijing will never happen again…

Thomas
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

It’s laughable how slow you are in every other stroke or distance compared to us. It is literally impossible for us to lose. Sorry

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Thomas
1 month ago

USA was 0.5 seconds slower in the women’s 4 x 100 meter freestyle relay at the Tokyo 2021 Olympics than at the 2013 FINA World Aquatics Championships. Talk about regression.

USA Swimming needs to post help wanted signs at 50 meter pools across the country:

USA Swimming
Help Wanted
Female Swimmers
100/200 meter freestyle
No posers allowed

Sub13
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

This is embarrassing. I’m literally wondering if you’re just pretending to be Aussie and posting this stuff to make us look bad. Australians don’t talk like this.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

That was not the case prior to the Tokyo 2021 Olympics.

Sub13
Reply to  Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
1 month ago

Well that’s false. The comments from Americans leading up to abd during the Olympics was absolutely vile and you were one of the main culprits.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

I don’t genuflect to the Aussie fan base.

Fean Darris
Reply to  Sub13
1 month ago

Stop crying you literally accused Dressel of doping after his 50m free and then cried to the mods. I can accuse Americans of doping but you can’t accuse my swimmers 😎

Last edited 1 month ago by Fean Darris
new york’s battle leader
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

the only thing your women have going is the sprint free… the only deep event the aussies have

CanSwimFan
Reply to  new york’s battle leader
1 month ago

Kaylee McKeown would like a word.

new york’s battle leader
Reply to  CanSwimFan
1 month ago

the aussies rely only on mckeown for their backstroke. there’s a reason why united states of backstroke is a thing that’s thrown around

Armstrong 100 back gold in Fukuoka
Reply to  new york’s battle leader
1 month ago

United States of backstroke won one bronze in women’s backstroke last summer. Australia won 2 golds and 1 bronze.

Backstroke medals at Tokyo Olympics:
Russia: 2 golds 1 silver
Aussie: 2 golds 1 bronze
US: 1 silver 2 bronze
Canada: 2 silvers

Last edited 1 month ago by Armstrong 100 back gold in Fukuoka
Smith-King-Huske-Curzan

What about 2012 and 2016?

Armstrong 100 back gold in Fukuoka
Reply to  new york’s battle leader
1 month ago

Wait for Mollie O to throw down some backstroke time very soon.

Sub13
Reply to  new york’s battle leader
1 month ago

Yet two Australian women won backstroke medals and only one American did. You realise why this comment is stupid right?

Stephen
Reply to  CanSwimFan
1 month ago

don’t kill a good story with facts

LukeWarm
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

I will tell you the steps of what needs to happen for USA to pull off another Lezak-inspired miracle USA coaches take note…

  1. Pray that the hypothesis about Austrlia peaking hard at trails but choking in events that matter and the 49.5 yard pool myth is true.
  2. Huske and Curzan are gonna clutch up and swim sub 53, and by miracle Commerford will swim a low 53.
  3. USA will draft on Australias wave, and will put a back-half swimmer on the last leg and Shayna Jack will tighten up…

If first 2 steps are somewhat true than step 3 doesn’t even have to happen

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  LukeWarm
1 month ago

What steps to take to be competitive in the women’s 4 x 100 meter freestyle relay:

The resurrection of Simone Manuel. A change of scenery for Abbey Weitzeil. An explanation for the regression of Mallory Comerford from the 2017 FINA World Aquatics Championships.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  LukeWarm
1 month ago

You do realize that Huske and Curzan will be swimming the heats and semifinals of women’s 100 meter butterfly on the same day of the women’s 4 x 100 meter freestyle relay?

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  LukeWarm
1 month ago

If Erika Brown leads off with another 54.02, I’m liable to throw a brick thru my television set.

Troyy
Reply to  Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
1 month ago

lol settle down.

Justanopinion
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

Good that you can brag so much about your dominance with a less than reticent dirty doper filling the 2 spot. That relay gets a lot less braggy for you if you take out the dirty doper (and she still has to pass more doping tests to get to that podium). And. Let’s be honest. Outside Tokyo there’s always the Aussie chokefest that’s a pretty decent mainstay at meets like this. So. Maybe don’t collect your super dominant gold medal just yet.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

Hey genius! Abbey Weitzeil did not even qualify for the 2022 FINA World Aquatics Championships.

There's no doubt that he's tightening up
Reply to  Swimfan
1 month ago

Apparently the media twisted Bernard’s words: https://swimswam.com/lezak-bousquet-share-insights-on-epic-400-free-relay-in-beijing/

And anyways can’t always rely on having the greatest relay swim of all time…

Usa baby
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

US winning times were faster in everything except 100 free and 400 free sk far

August
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

Do you want a cookie?

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

Whoever said USA were the favorites in the women’s 4 x 100 meter freestyle relay? As a matter of fact, USA may not even medal in the women’s 4 x 100 meter freestyle relay.

Fean Darris
Reply to  ICU
1 month ago

You keep on talking about the Women’s but what about the Men’s 4×100 team what have they done the last 2 decades country with the most 47 freestylers but haven’t done shit in the relay USA BITCH

Oceanian
1 month ago

And we’re off…

Lani’s 800 free the performance of the night for me.

But many other pleasing results too.

Bobo Gigi
1 month ago

2019 WORLD JUNIORS WOMEN’S 100 FREE FINAL
1. Gretchen Walsh USA 53.74
….
3. Meg Harris AUS 54.58
4. Mollie O’Callaghan AUS 54.84

BEST TIME FOR EACH SWIMMER IN 2021
Meg Harris AUS 52.92
Mollie O’Callaghan AUS 53.08
Gretchen Walsh USA 55.09

BEST TIME FOR EACH SWIMMER IN 2022 (as of today)
Mollie O’Callaghan AUS 52.49
Meg Harris AUS 53.09
Gretchen Walsh USA 55.57

You can draw your own conclusions….

Last edited 1 month ago by Bobo Gigi
Notanyswimmer
Reply to  Bobo Gigi
1 month ago

Proof that bathtub swimming wrecks the endurance of American swimmers, which is why when they compete in LCM, the piano always drops

eye guy
Reply to  Notanyswimmer
1 month ago

Please tell that to Simone Manuel running down and passing Cate Campbell in the last 15 meters in many international finals

Troyy
Reply to  eye guy
1 month ago
new york’s battle leader
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago
new york’s battle leader
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

oh enjoy the seven minutes of simone humbling and smoking the campbells https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PB5FIhmAM7Q

Usa baby
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

like Rio and Gwanju?

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Usa baby
1 month ago

Remember Cate Campbell was too chicken to show up at the 2017 FINA World Aquatics Championships.

Robbos
Reply to  Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
1 month ago

Don’t forget Manuel choking I mean over training syndrome in 2021!!!! Choke, cough

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Robbos
1 month ago

That one really stuck in your craw.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Robbos
1 month ago

Speaking of choke, 4 Summer Olympics, 2 measly individual bronze medals for Cate Campbell.

At the 2016 Summer Olympics, Simone Manuel won 1 individual gold medal, 1 individual silver medal.

LOL!

Robbos
Reply to  Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
1 month ago

We just had an 18 year old girl go 52.49 & another 52.60 & neither of them are named Campbell or McKeon, so I’m happy to be called chokers.

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Robbos
1 month ago

Speaking of the Campbell sisters, how many individual medals has lil sis won at the Summer Olympics?

Robbos
Reply to  Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
1 month ago

We just had an 18 year old girl go 52.49 & another 52.60!!!!

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Robbos
1 month ago

Am I somehow denying the current status of the women’s 4 x 100 meter freestyle relays? Have you not been reading my posts on the dire condition of female sprinting for the USA?

2022 FINA World Aquatics Championships
Women’s 4 x 100 meter freestyle relay
AUS
CAN
CHN – that’s not a misprint
USA

Troyy
Reply to  Usa baby
1 month ago

That video is Gwangju. Manuel set her PB at the same meet.

Last edited 1 month ago by Troyy
new york’s battle leader
Reply to  Troyy
1 month ago

lol does the campbell sisters have a seven minute video dedicated to beating simone? yeah i think not https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PB5FIhmAM7Q

new york’s battle leader
Reply to  eye guy
1 month ago

simone manuel always smoking that campbell pack 🤭🤭🤭🤭🚬🚬🚬🚬

Last edited 1 month ago by new york’s battle leader
new york’s battle leader
Reply to  Notanyswimmer
1 month ago

*laughs in simone manuel btfo cate campbell and smoking that campbell pack in an outside lane in 2019*

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Notanyswimmer
1 month ago

Michael Phelps started in a bathtub. Ditto Katie Ledecky.

End of discussion.

Mike
Reply to  Bobo Gigi
1 month ago

USA scholastic swimming in short course yards for a century. USA internationally dominate for that same century. You can draw your own conclusions.

nuotofan
Reply to  Bobo Gigi
1 month ago

Bobo, you could also consider the second finisher, Torri Huske: 54.54 in that 2019 Worlds Junior final, and then 54.18 in 2021 and 53.35 in 2022 (till now): slower progression than the two Aussie swimmers (and Harris had injuries in this season) but a fairly good progression (and Huske is also a flier). Obviously every swimmer has his/her own trajectory and it was pretty obvious for me, at these 2019 Junior Worlds, the huge potential of the 15 year-old Mollie O’Callaghan (she was more than a year younger than Gretchen Walsh and two year younger than Harris and Huske) who swam great times also in the 50 and 100 backstroke and in that 100 free final had the second fastest… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by nuotofan
Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  nuotofan
1 month ago

The USA is currently in a female sprinter crisis (100/200 meter freestyle).

Smith-King-Huske-Curzan
Reply to  Bobo Gigi
1 month ago

That Gretchen Walsh is doomed to be a kiddie pool swimmer?

Swimswamswum
Reply to  Bobo Gigi
1 month ago

Gretchen Walsh is THE MOST TALENTED FEMALE SPRINTER EVER!!