2021 British Olympic Selection Trials – Day 4 Finals Live Recap

2021 BRITISH SWIMMING SELECTION TRIALS

As the second last night of racing begins at the 2021 British Olympic Selection Trials, it will be a sprint-infused section featuring the men’s 50 freestyle, women’s 100 freestyle, and the men’s 100 fly. Also taking place on day 4 will be the women’s 200 backstroke and 200 IM.

Upon the conclusion of day 3 finals, 19 swimmers had hit the British Olympic selection standard in their respective events. Follow along for a live recap and analysis to find out who else will add their name to that list tonight.

WOMEN’S 100 FREESTYLE – FINAL

  • British Record: 52.87 – Francesca Halsall (2009)
  • British OLY Selection Cut: 53.88

Top 3

  1. Freya Anderson – 53.40
  2. Anna Hopkin– 53.49
  3. Lucy Hope – 54.19

Anna Hopkin opened things up with a 25.43 while Freya Anderson slightly trailed in a 25.83. Anderson, however, managed to overtake Hopkin’s lead and came in with a 53.40, touching just ahead of Hopkin’s 53.49. Both Hopkin and Anderson managed to get under the selection cut for the event which stands at a 53.88, likely giving them a spot on the British Olympic squad this summer.

The swims from Hopkin and Anderson are likely to give Great Britain two swimmers in the event at the Olympics which would be an improvement from 2016 when they actually didn’t send any women to the Games for the event.

Lucy Hope delivered a 54.19 which was just under Caitlin McClatchey‘s Scottish in the record from back in 2008. That was an improvement for Hope from her prelim swim of 54.52. Hope was followed by Evelyn Davis who notched a 54.59 and Emma Russell who notched a 55.16 for 5th place.

 MEN’S 50 FREESTYLE – FINAL

  • British Record: 21.11 – Ben Proud (2018)
  • British OLY Selection Cut: 21.78

Top 3

  1. Ben Proud – 21.42
  2. Yusuke Legard – 22.10
  3. Jacob Whittle – 22.55

After an already impressive performance in the prelims of the event with a 21.68, Ben Proud was even faster in the finals of the event, posting a 21.42 to get within 0.40 seconds of his own British record in the event. The swim will be enough to qualify Ben Proud for his second Olympic Games in the event as he was more than 0.30 seconds under the selection cut of 21.78.

The swim gives Proud the second-fastest time in the world this year, only behind Russia’s Vlad Morozov who swam a 21.41 at the Russian Olympic Championships. Proud was just off the time he swam at the 2016 Rio Olympics when he placed 4th in the final with a 21.68.

2020-2021 LCM Men 50 Free

VladRUS
Morozov
04/09
21.41
2Ben
Proud
GBR21.4204/17
3Ryan
Held
USA21.6204/10
4Pawel
Juraszek
POL21.7204/28
4Florent
Manaudou
FRA21.7203/19
View Top 48»

Jacob Legard picked up silver in the event with a 22.10 which was faster than his prelim swim of 22.43 but not quite under the British selection cut of 21.78. Legard’s silver medal meant that he passed Jacob Whittle who was second seed heading into the final. Whittle notched a 22.55 in the final which was just a bit slower than his 22.40 prelim swim.

David Cumberlidge and Scott McLay tied for fourth place in the 50 free final, each notching a 22.63 while Jack Thorpe rounded out the top 5 in a 22.76.

WOMEN’S 200 BACKSTROKE – FINAL

  • British Record: 2:06.66 – Gemma Spofforth (2009)
  • British OLY Selection Cut: 2:08.44

Top 3

  1. Kathleen Dawson – 2:08.14
  2. Cassie Wild – 2:10.94
  3. Honey Osrin – 2:11.76

It was all Kathleen Dawson in the 200 backstroke, coming in with a powerful 2:08.14 which was faster than both the Scottish record in the event and the Olympic selection cut of 2:08.44. Dawson improved upon her own Scottish record by exactly a second, improving upon her 2:09.44 from March 2021.

That makes it 2-for-2 Olympic qualifying swims for Dawson this week, having already qualified to swim the 100 backstroke with a 58.24 on day 2. The 2:08.14 for Dawson makes her the 8th fastest performer in the world this season.

2020-2021 LCM Women 200 Back

KayleeAUS
McKeown
11/15
2:04.46
2Margherita
Panziera
ITA2:05.5603/31
3Phoebe
Bacon
USA2:06.8405/14
4Regan
Smith
USA2:06.9005/14
5Rhyan
White
USA2:07.2404/11
6Emily
Seebohm
AUS2:07.4604/17
7Kathleen
Baker
USA2:07.5403/05
8Kylie
Masse
CAN2:07.6005/08
View Top 26»

Dawson was joined on the podium by Cassie Wild with a 2:10.94 for silver and Honey Osrin notched a 2:11.76 for bronze. Neither of those swims from Wild and Osrin was quick enough to qualify for the Olympics as they each trailed the required 2:08.44.

MEN’S 100 BUTTERFLY – FINAL

  • British Record: 50.67 – James Guy (2017)
  • British OLY Selection Cut: 51.96

Top 3

  1. James Guy – 51.44
  2. Jacob Peters – 51.66
  3. Edward Mildred – 52.67

Both James Guy and Jacob Peters managed to swim faster than the Olympic cut in the men’s 100 butterfly, likely giving them both a shot at swimming the event in Tokyo this summer. Guy was a 51.44 to swim a full half-second under the selection cut of 51.96 while Peters was a 51.65 for silver.

With that winning time of 51.44, James Guy moves up in the world rankings this season to tie Poland’s Jakub Majerski for 7th.

2020-2021 LCM Men 100 Fly

KristofHUN
Milak
03/27
50.47
2Michael
Andrew
USA50.8005/14
3Naoki
Mizunuma
JPN51.0304/09
4Josif
Miladinov
BUL51.0812/19
5Caeleb
Dressel
USA51.1504/09
View Top 26»

This was Guy’s second butterfly win of the meet, adding to his 200 fly victory of 1:55.20 on day 2 of the meet. Edward Mildred won bronze in that 200 fly with a 1:58.04 and returned to the podium here in the 100 butterfly with a 52.67.

WOMEN’S 200 IM – FINAL

  • British Record: 2:06.88 – Siobhan-Marie O’Connor (2016)
  • British OLY Selection Cut: 2:11.10

Top 3

  1. Abbie Wood – 2:09.23
  2. Alicia Wilson – 2:09.61
  3. Candice Hall – 2:13.67

Abbie Wood and Alicia Wilson battled it out in the women’s 200 IM and each produced a swim good enough for consideration for the 2021 British Olympic squad. Wood won the event in a 2:09.23 and Wilson was a 2:09.61 for silver, each nearly 2 seconds faster than the selection cut of 2:11.10.

The 200 IM marks Wood’s second Olympic qualifying swim of the meet, having swum a 2:21.69 200 breast to place second to Molly Renshaw’s 2:20.89 and get under the Olympic standard of 2:23.37. Behind Wilson in the 200 IM, Candice Hall came in with a 2:13.67 for bronze.

One notable absence in the 200 IM at British Trials was national record holder Siobhan-Marie O’Connor who has been as fast as a 2:06.88 in the event with which she won Olympic silver in 2016. O’Connor announced in the days leading up to the meet that she wouldn’t be participating due to ulcerative colitis; a chronic illness that she faces.

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Dee
1 month ago

You’d really hope to see the womens 4×1 go to Tokyo after that – They have a chance of sneaking a top 5 finish.

BOOBSTROKE
Reply to  Dee
1 month ago

Yeah outside USA, AUS, CAN there isn’t too much depth – maybe France and Netherlands?

Their cumulative time is 0.17s outside the British Swimming standard (which I believe is quicker than the British record) so hopefully a shot at Euros

Last edited 1 month ago by BOOBSTROKE
Daaaave
Reply to  Dee
1 month ago

It will be beyond frustrating if they don’t take this relay.

Skoorbnagol
Reply to  Daaaave
1 month ago

No way, who’s the 4th girl they take?
I can’t see them using anyone who it affects individual performances.
Unsure they will even swim the men’s 4x100free.

Dee
Reply to  Skoorbnagol
1 month ago

I’m with you in expecting them not to take a female 4×1. No spot, no ranked time, will need to swim it at Euros and who knows if that’ll even go ahead(?)… I’ll be shocked if the mens 4×1 doesn’t get the nod though.

Skoorbnagol
Reply to  Dee
1 month ago

The 4×100 men needs Scott. Scott has real medal chances on 200free / 200IM 4×200 and 4x100IM relay. I’m not convinced racing the 4x100free is wise idea. 9 day meet, survival and about energy conservation. Would love to see the lads in the final, without Scott is it worth it, with them is placing 5~8th at the expense of using energy when he could win both 200IM and free, or not medal at all.
Scott Guy Dean and Litchfield are all great swimmers, none of them have 100free as there best event. Whittle is 16, Richards 18, are we building a team around teenagers in a event dominated by men?
Look at the stuff GB pulled in 2016,… Read more »

Sapnu puas
Reply to  Dee
1 month ago

“ . In the event the relay time as calculated in 5.3 and 5.4 (in freestyle for 5.3 and any stroke for 5.4) falls outside the time in Table 1 the NPD may at his complete discretion re-rank a relay time using combined individual times or a faster relay split, from the 2019 World Championships”

Doesn’t this mean they can use Hopkins/Anderson splits from 2019 to justify them reaching the time? So if they do qualify there’s no reason they shouldn’t go right? I mean they can throw wood in as fourth if they don’t want to take Davis (harsh!)

Nick
Reply to  Dee
1 month ago

Sweden with Hanssonx2 Coleman Sjostrom will also be top 5 contenders

AnEn
Reply to  Dee
29 days ago

Don’t see them finishing top 5, but maybe 6th. Australia, USA, Canada, China and France should be stronger, not sure about the Netherlands and Sweden. They would definitely have a very good chance to make the final.

BOOBSTROKE
1 month ago

Maybe a 4×1 team? 2 x 53s and 2 x 54s? Fingers crossed!

Jeff
1 month ago

Some great performances there in the 100 free. Freya and Anna aren’t far off their PBs and look really decent. Also great to see Anna going quicker in finals than prelims as she is normally slower. Amazing PBs for Lucy Hope and Evelyn Davis with a 54.6 at 16 years old.