Russians Morozov, Lobintsev Are Cleared To Compete In Rio, Says FINA

UPDATE: Despite several comments from Russian officials, FINA denies that they have the final say on Morozov and Lobintsev competing in Rio.

Russian state-run media outlet TASS is reporting that both Vladimir Morozov and Nikita Lobintsev have been given the green light by FINA to compete at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio.

Russian sports lawyer, Artyom Patsev, stated to TASS today, August 2nd, “Yes, Morozov and Lobintsev were granted permission from FINA to take part in the Olympics.”

FINA named both Morozov and Lobintsev as two of three swimmers who were a part of the “disappearing positives” program run by Russian doping authorities that turned positive tests into negative (clean) tests.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) had instructed International Federations that all athletes who have previously been sanctioned for doping violations or who were named in the McLaren IP report related to the disappearing positive tests were ineligible for the Olympics, but largely put the onus on international federations.

Both Morozov and Lobintsev had lodged appeals with the Court Arbitration of Sport (CAS) and a decision from that organization was expected today.

In the meantime, Russian Swimming Federation President Vladimir Salnikov said in a press conference last week that (roughly translated from Russian), “the president of FINA Julio Maglione [a] few days ago expressed support for athletes Morozov [and] Lobintsov… [they have] not committed any violations[.] FINA has asked WADA confirms the information I hope that in the end the report of the independent commission WADA Richard McLaren will not affect their participation in the Olympic Games.”

Morozov and Lobintsev are key components of Russian relays, with Morozov having been part of the nation’s bronze medal-winning 4x100m freestyle squad at the 2012 Olympics, while Lobintsev scored a silver as part of Russia’s 4x200m freestyle relay in Beijing.

Reigning World Champion breaststroker, Yulia Efimova, also filed her appeal with CAS on July 31st, but no decision on her Olympic participation has yet been announced.

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Andrei Vorontsov
5 years ago

Lobintsev also was a part of 4×100 free in London

ShakeMyHead
5 years ago

This is a sick joke… Now “everyone” is happy. IOC and the NOC have seemingly done their part and now cleared to compete. These Olympics are a sad joke.
I wonder what new drug the Russians are already using

Onehandtouch
Reply to  ShakeMyHead
5 years ago

Except Efimova.

Joe
Reply to  Onehandtouch
5 years ago

Her appeal will be heard later this week.

emg1986
Reply to  Joe
5 years ago

Her appeal was heard yesterday, adjourned until this afternoon.

cheatinvlad
Reply to  Onehandtouch
5 years ago

Yulia will swim. No need to worry there.

Rafael
Reply to  ShakeMyHead
5 years ago

The same as Gatlin, maybe? Not that I am on their side, all of them should be out of Rio.. Specially Gatlin and Efimova. Shouldn´t double doping convicts be banned for Life?

Steve Nolan
Reply to  Rafael
5 years ago

Gatlin’s an interesting case. Like, this article (Link) paints him in a super redemptive light. And I can kinda buy it! But also, come on.

Iain
Reply to  Steve Nolan
5 years ago

As all but the most blinkered US athletics fans will say, Gatlin is pretty much the worst of the worst. His ban after his second offence was inexplicably halved from 8 to 4 years by USADA, just before they gave Tyson Gay a pathetically short ban of 1 year for steroid use.

It is by no means comparable to the likes of Russia but USADA has a little way to go in getting its house in order.

I must also say that I have less sympathy with US drug cheats. I wonder how much choice Russian athletes really get in the matter, and do athletes from the former Eatern bloc even know that they are being doped up by their… Read more »

pianoback
Reply to  Iain
5 years ago

I generally pull for Team USA, but I can NOT root for Gatlin. No way, no how.

thomaslurzfan
Reply to  Iain
5 years ago

I agree with your last point, but we shouldnt act as if those doped athletes are victims, they know fully well what they are doing and just want to earn a better living. In general doping is a bigger problem in poor countries, where people cant really lose anything by doping. If they get caught, then they will just lead the same miserable life as before and maybe their country even continues to support them during their ban + they dont have to pay back the prize money. I really dont understand why most countries dont have a real punishment for doping. Doping is cheating and there are victims who lose a lot of money thanks to the dopers. I… Read more »

bwiab
Reply to  thomaslurzfan
5 years ago

Your words “Doping is cheating”. This is where the problem lies. From my experience in USA Swimming, a lot of people do NOT have a problem with Cheating. The excuses: “everyone else does it”, “the rules don’t apply”, “this meet doesn’t matter”, “the time pad failed”, “unplugging the time pad is better for the athlete”, “we’ll do for you too”, “the rules are only guidelines and we don’t have to follow them”, “cannot have times from Masters meet entered into SWIMS unless you are a former Olympian”, “Lets vote on whether or not to continue cheating”, “Breaking the rules isn’t cheating”, “Can’t hold a review hearing, because no mature athletes available”. The excuses that are used are unbelievable.

I believe… Read more »

Steve Nolan
Reply to  Iain
5 years ago

The TL;DR of the article: Gatlin’s initial ban seems legitimately nbd, I think it was for Adderall. The second one is the nebulous one – he signs up with a pretty “dirty” coach, gets popped. If anything, ya gotta fault him for being naive. He’s no different than anyone else, IMO.

It even goes into his recent success, that it’s a whole technique/lifestyle change that’s really done it. If anything, that’s the least believable part.

thomaslurzfan
Reply to  Rafael
5 years ago

Wasnt Efimova cleared, because she only used Meldonium and pretty much everyone who used Meldonium was cleared? I think you could say that Efimova was only banned once?
The difference is that Gatlin isnt part of a state-run doping system. Russia will never learn their lesson if they dont get punished. Just listen to most of the russian athletes and their officials + Putin, they wont change anything and they think that this is all a big conspiracy by western countries.

cheatinvlad
Reply to  Rafael
5 years ago

Gatlin for the win!

Trojan
Reply to  ShakeMyHead
5 years ago

Everyone seems to have already forgotten that there was any evidence that Vlad was involved in the disappearing or even tested positive, and that Lobintsev was cleared of all charges. Innocent until proven guilty, anyone?

Y Choi
Reply to  ShakeMyHead
5 years ago

Show me a positive result by either Lobintsev or Morozov – the latter having undergone systematic testing for years as part of the NCAA circuit – then make unfactual and biased accusations…

Iain
5 years ago

So could we end up with these two + Efimova but not the other 4 (?) as they didn’t bother to file to CAS?

Attila the Hunt
Reply to  Iain
5 years ago

Because Russia doesn’t need them and they need some people to be sacrificed to make as if FINA still look toough.

BARF BARF BARF

thomaslurzfan
Reply to  Attila the Hunt
5 years ago

Ustinova wouldve been part of their medley relay and she also wouldve been a medal contender in womens 200 back and their only medal contender on the womens side except for Efimova.

Attila the Hunt
Reply to  thomaslurzfan
5 years ago

Russian women’s medley relay is not even close to the medal contenders.
She is also on the second or third tiers of 200 back, there are half dozen other girls stronger than she is.

thomaslurzfan
Reply to  Attila the Hunt
5 years ago

1) Where did i say that the russian medley relay is a medal contender? Medals will go to USA, Australia and China.
2) Please name those athletes (six or more). Seebohm, Hosszu, maybe Dirado, maybe Franklin, maybe Hocking and … ?
Currently Ustinova is 5th in world ranking, only 0.04 behind 3rd place and only 0.43 behind first place, i wouldnt call her a second or third tier athlete …
in addition to that she is much younger than everyone ahead of her and last year she improved her PB at the world championships, i dont see a reason why she shouldnt have improved her entry time in Rio.
Apart from that i would never call… Read more »

G.I.N.A
Reply to  Attila the Hunt
5 years ago

Youth & lack of money . Her parents may have been given the choice & did not consent or could not afford any extra expenses. We do not know unles you have long range vision & can see her from your back porch.

boo
5 years ago

Cant wait to hear the boos when their names are called

bobo gigi
5 years ago

Please, when can we talk about sport and not about NBC, Zika, terrorism, fires, doping, corruption, pollution or hair dye? 🙄

Bob
Reply to  bobo gigi
5 years ago

Unfortunately the former is being strongly and negatively influenced by all of the later, with the exception of hair dye 😉

Coachandy
Reply to  bobo gigi
5 years ago

Vive LePen!

Steve Nolan
Reply to  bobo gigi
5 years ago

Um, no? We shouldn’t just throw our head into the sand regarding all the other issues surrounding the games. “Stick to sports” is shortsighted and wrongheaded.

emg1986
5 years ago

There is some pretty hilarious information about their case. Not least that FINA did not provide the information in the McLaren report to the arbitration panel (not official, but pretty reliable source).

Attila the Hunt
Reply to  emg1986
5 years ago

if that is true, then W T F??!!!!????

Dee
Reply to  Attila the Hunt
5 years ago

Haven’t FINA been giving out gongs trying to get into Vlad P’s good-books for the past 18monts? Hardly a shocker, they probably asked the bloody Kremlin which bits of ‘information’ they wanted them to use against Morozov/Lobintsev.

So predictable.

Andrei Vorontsov
5 years ago

World road cycling champion Lizzie Armitstead has won an appeal against an anti-doping rule violation that could have forced her to miss the Olympics.

The Briton faced a possible two-year suspension for missing three drugs tests in a 12-month period, but one of them has now been declared void.

“I have always been and will always be a clean athlete and have been vocal in my anti-doping stance,” she said. Armitstead, 27, won Team GB’s first medal, a silver, at London 2012.

She is considered one of the favourites to win gold in the women’s road race at the 2016 Rio Games on Sunday.

Fellow Briton Christine Ohuruogu, who won Olympic 400m gold in 2008, was banned for a year… Read more »

emg1986
Reply to  Andrei Vorontsov
5 years ago

I’m pretty sure Rio Ferdinand was banned for missing 3 tests as well…

One of those was voided due to the missed test being an administrative error on UKAD’s part. Also this test was missed while she was competing and therefore she had been tested the same day anyway. pretty easy to see why it was voided.

Dee
Reply to  Andrei Vorontsov
5 years ago

You kind of disproved the point you seem to be trying to make with your final line. UKAD made no bones about CO, they gave her the most severe possibly punishment at the time – They then successful stopped a known doper (Dwain Chambers) making it onto the 2008 GB Olympic team. On this occasion, as unfortunate as it is, they accepted it was their procedural error that has created this situation.

It’s very much open to debate whether Armitstead should be compete, I don’t begrudged anybody who feels she shouldn’t as I really can understand why. However, with such substantiated accusations lodged against Morozov/Lobintsev in an extremely thorough & fair McLaren report, I don’t think we can liken the… Read more »

Iain
Reply to  Dee
5 years ago

It should also be noted that Ohuruogu was banned when the whereabouts system was first brought in and wasn’t really taken seriously – there were a whole host of athletes on two missed tests.

There was never any suspicion that she actually doped, hence why she was given an exception to the BOA rule which banned dopers from the GB Olympic team (struck down in the courts ahead of London 2012)

thomaslurzfan
Reply to  Andrei Vorontsov
5 years ago

Nothing new here. GB was really bad in sport until 2008 olympics and then their performances suddenly exploded, they also suddenly became the best country in one of the dirtiest sports (cycling), dominating the Tour the France with Wiggins and Froome. Not to talk about athletes like Radcliffe or Farah, their system really seems to work.

Iain
Reply to  thomaslurzfan
5 years ago

I’m not sure whether or not you are casting aspersions here or not …

GB were not ‘really bad’ until 2008, performances had been improving rapidly since lottery funding came in, post-1996. It was hardly surprising that Beijing had the best non-home medal haul ever, given it was leading up to London.

Road cycling has been seen as one of the super-dirty sports, not track cycling, where GB have excelled.

thomaslurzfan
Reply to  Iain
5 years ago

Not really bad?
From 1992 to 2004 you never won more than 30 medals and never finished better than 10th in medal table. In 2008 you won 47 medals and finished 4th in medal table. In 2012 you won 29 golds (69 medals in total) and finished 3rd in medal table.

1992 – 2004: Never more than 30 medals
2012: 69 medals
1992 – 2004: Never better than 10th in medal table
2012: 3rd in medal table
1992 – 2004: Never more than 11 golds
2012: 29 golds

Thats really a fast improvement …
Anyway, this isnt the topic of this article and i am sure that most other host countries have… Read more »

G.I.N.A
Reply to  Iain
5 years ago

The Australian track cycling team , from which all GB staff were poached , has at least one skeleton safely dead . Thsre was enor ous pressure on him to spill/not spill the beans so suicide was the easiest way out .

Mike Reys
Reply to  Andrei Vorontsov
5 years ago

She missed three drug tests. The first one was her fault, the second one was clearly documented for urgent family reasons (understandable and still her own fault), the third one she was there. The reception of the hotel where she was staying with the team (and where she said she’d be) just didn’t ring her up.

G.I.N.A
Reply to  Mike Reys
5 years ago

She does not have a cell phone . ? Wouldn’t they send a txt – we are here in the lobby .turn up now .

Mike Reys
Reply to  Andrei Vorontsov
5 years ago

She missed three drug tests. The first one was her fault, the second one was clearly documented for urgent family reasons (understandable and still her own fault), the third one she was there. The reception of the hotel where she was staying with the team (and where she said she’d be) just didn’t ring her up.

Poseidon
5 years ago

Ok so now with a new serious team for the 4×100 freestyle cause in London 2012 they finished 3rd with Morozov and Lobintsev …

Attila the Hunt
Reply to  Poseidon
5 years ago

Their London medals should be forfeited.

Steve Nolan
Reply to  Attila the Hunt
5 years ago

Yes. Erase all trace of them from the internet as well. Hell, let’s just all get Eternal Sunshine‘d and erase our memories of them. Go back in time, kill ’em as babies. WHOO.

Murica
Reply to  Steve Nolan
5 years ago

Drugs are bad mkaaay

Murica
Reply to  Murica
5 years ago

I mean that, cheater

About Retta Race

Retta Race

Swim analyst, businesswoman.

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