Only 17 Swimmers are Entered in the Women’s 200 Fly for Tokyo Olympics

Only 17 women are scheduled to contest the women’s 200 fly at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. With one of those swimmers being a Universality entry almost 9 seconds slower than anybody else in the field, the rest of the entrants have essentially a free-pass into the semifinal.

The top seed in the event will be China’s Yufei Zhang, followed by Americans Hali Flickinger and Regan Smith. The defending World Champion Boglarka Kapas enters as the 4th seed and Katinka Hosszu enters as the 5th seed.

What’s even more interesting is that if Hosszu scratches, and she’s a prime candidate to do so after skipping prelims of the event in Rio, there would only be 16 entries.

FINA rule SW.3.2.2 seems to imply that, even at the Olympic Games, the preliminary events can be bypassed if they aren’t necessary, though no rule explicitly states what defines being necessary. That would, though, would require Hosszu to scratch ahead of time, which she didn’t do at the Rio Olympics.

SwimSwam has reached out to FINA for clarification on the rule, and whether a preliminary round would be bypassed at the Olympics.

Either way, the lack of pressure to swim fast in prelims will be a huge benefit for those swimmers like Regan Smith and Katinka Hosszu who have big event schedules lined up this week. The 200 fly heats come on day 4 of the meet, with semi-finals on day 5 and finals on day 6.

If that happens, it would be a historic moment for Honduras, as Julimar Avila Mancia would have the opportunity to advance to the semifinals and become the first Honduras swimmer to ever emerge from a preliminary round at the Olympics. She is seeded at a 2:18.38.

It also all-but-assures Remedy Rule a spot in the semifinals for the Philippines. The Philippines actually have two Olympic medals from the 1928 and 1932 Games when Teofilo Yldefonso won back-to-back bronze medals in the men’s 200 breaststroke, but Rule’s advancement would be a more modern anomaly.

The women’s 400 IM entries for Tokyo only have 19 swimmers, though with no semi-finals in that race, it would require many more scratches to ask the same question.

As even compared to the 2016 Olympics, both events have much smaller fields. In Rio, there were 28 entries in the women’s 200 fly (minus Hossuz’s declared false start) and 33 in the women’s 400 IM.

So what changed? It makes sense that you wouldn’t see a lot of universality entries in these more grueling events, as developing swim nations tend to focus their efforts on shorter and more manageable races. In Tokyo, there were far fewer Universality spots available because of the top nations sending more athletes with “A” cuts. What’s more, with the COVID challenges created for gaining access to training, it makes some sense that these longer events would suffer in internal rankings – where countries were required to send their top male and female by FINA points for Universality.

There weren’t many Universality choices in these races in Rio either. Rather, it seems as though there are far fewer “A” cut swimmers in these events and far fewer invites for “B” cut swimmers.

Remember that “B” cut swimmers actually receive a lower invite priority than do Universality swimmers. So with a smaller field invited this year (the cap was 878, though only 855 were on the initial entry lists), “B” cut entries will suffer. “B” cut swimmers are chosen by the highest World Ranking as of the June 27 end of the qualifying period.

All of the above comes under the absence of defending Olympic champion Mireia Belmonte of Spain, who is swimming other events in Tokyo but who didn’t actually earn a qualifying standard in the 200 fly.

Entries By Event

Event Entries
Women’s 50m Freestyle 82
Men’s 100m Freestyle 73
Men’s 50m Freestyle 72
Men’s 100m Butterfly 59
Women’s 100m Freestyle 52
Men’s 100m Breaststroke 50
Women’s 100m Breaststroke 46
Men’s 200m Individual Medley 45
Women’s 100m Backstroke 43
Men’s 100m Backstroke 42
Men’s 200m Freestyle 40
Men’s 200m Breaststroke 40
Women’s 100m Free (relay only) 38
Men’s 200m Butterfly 38
Men’s 400m Freestyle 37
Women’s 200m Free (relay only) 34
Men’s 800m Freestyle 34
Women’s 200m Breaststroke 33
Women’s 100m Butterfly 33
Women’s 1500m Freestyle 32
Women’s 800m Freestyle 32
Men’s 200m Free (relay only) 31
Men’s 400m Individual Medley 31
Women’s 200m Freestyle 30
Women’s 400m Freestyle 29
Men’s 200m Backstroke 29
Women’s 200m Individual Medley 28
Men’s 1500m Freestyle 28
Women’s 200m Backstroke 27
Men’s 100m Free (relay only) 27
Women’s 400m Individual Medley 19
Women’s 200m Butterfly 17
Women’s 100m Back (relay only) 6
Women’s 100m Bfly (relay only) 4
Women’s 100m Breast (relayonly) 4
Men’s 100m Back (relay only) 3
Men’s 100m Breast (relay only) 3
Men’s 100m Bfly (relay only) 2

Women’s 200 Fly Entry List

Preferred Family Name Preferred Given Name Gender Country Event Entry Time
ZHANG YUFEI F CHN Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:05.44
FLICKINGER HALI F USA Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:05.85
SMITH REGAN F USA Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:06.39
KAPAS BOGLARKA F HUN Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:06.50
HOSSZU KATINKA F HUN Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:06.62
YU LIYAN F CHN Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:06.83
STEPHENS LAURA F GBR Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:07.04
THROSSELL BRIANNA F AUS Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:07.20
HASEGAWA SUZUKA F JPN Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:07.21
HENTKE FRANZISKA F GER Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:07.30
THOMAS ALYS MARGARET F GBR Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:07.40
CHIMROVA SVETLANA F ROC Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:08.26
MONTEIRO ANA F POR Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:08.40
BACH HELENA F DEN Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:08.89
TACYILDIZ DEFNE F TUR Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:09.37
RULE REMEDY F PHI Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:09.58
AVILA MANCIA JULIMAR F HON Women’s 200m Butterfly 2:18.38

In This Story

93
Leave a Reply

Subscribe
Notify of
93 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
BSD
13 days ago

Weakest/slowest event in the world right now

swimfast
Reply to  BSD
13 days ago

By a million miles. A 2:06 might actually win a medal

Coach Mike 1952
Reply to  swimfast
13 days ago

Yikes!

Brownish
Reply to  swimfast
13 days ago

2:06 may win.

Swim Nerd
Reply to  BSD
13 days ago

Says the guy on his couch who couldnt touch 2:10… Mary T held the WR for 19 yrs with a 2:06 and the last 3 WR were all in the magical year of 2009. Don’t throw shade on any Olympic swimming event.

MarkB
Reply to  Swim Nerd
13 days ago

2:05.9

DLswim
Reply to  Swim Nerd
12 days ago

Yes, because as a fan you are not allowed to criticize anybody unless you yourself are an Olympic gold medalist.

Brownish
Reply to  BSD
13 days ago

For ages.

The unoriginal Tim
Reply to  BSD
12 days ago

I agree the field looks thin but the event is not as weak as it appears. 30 swimmers have a Fina A cut during the qualifying period. It is just that only 15 of them are entered with the other two swimmers having a B cut and universality place. There are actually 163 women who have done the B cut during the qualifying period.

We may start to see a trend away from 200s as the rewards for 50/100s such as multiple medals for relays at Olympics plus ISL with skins as well. Why be a 200 swimmer these days?

National federations also think nothing of leaving an A cut 200 stroke swimmer at home but they will take a… Read more »

Pullbuoy
13 days ago

The women’s 400 IM entries for Tokyo only have 19, which leaves that race just a few scratches short of asking the same questions.

But only if there are 11 scratches given there are no semi finals in the 400IM…

Drama King
13 days ago

Dekkers 😥😥😥

The unoriginal Tim
Reply to  Drama King
13 days ago

Dekkers absolutely should be there. Selectors messed up. She is on an upward trajectory at that age. I think selectors tend to use percentages to decide who has a medal shot. That doesn’t work as well in 200s and up as there is a real tactical element. Dekkers would almost certainly final and when you have a lane you have a chance.

Having only 17 entries is shocking to me. I said in a different thread that the top 16 in rankings ought to be automatically invited to the Olympics. That would stop this scenario and would mean Dekkers could be there competing for Team FINA or Team Pepsi if Fina want to get sponsors to pay.

As for skipping… Read more »

commonwombat
Reply to  The unoriginal Tim
13 days ago

There was certainly a case for taking Dekkers and had I been a selector (given they weren’t really pushed for numbers); I’d have voted to take her.

HOWEVER, once you go outside the standard discretional “outs’ that are written into policy, you are opening yourself up to then having to take most if not all of those in that “grey area” ….. and some of those would most definitely be pushing the envelope when it comes to likely competitiveness. Otherwise, you’re opening yourself to legal challenges which never satisfy anyone other than the lawyers.

As for your assertion of her being an almost certain finalist; I’d beg differ. Legitimate finals potential but she’d most likely would’ve required a significant PB… Read more »

The unoriginal Tim
Reply to  commonwombat
13 days ago

I watched that trials race and she went out too fast. She has learned from that I am sure and won’t make that mistake again. You are right that pressure probably got to her but going to Tokyo now would help her learn about pressure.

I checked the rankings and 31 women did a Fina A cut in the qualifying period. That means with one universality swimmer 15 swimmers with an A cut are not there. Probably a couple are third ranked athletes from Japan and USA. Nevertheless that level of top athletes missing is devaluing the games.

We need a wildcard system or three per nation.

Last edited 13 days ago by The unoriginal Tim
commonwombat
Reply to  The unoriginal Tim
13 days ago

I’m a definite No to 3 per nation. People are in favour when its likely it may play in their favour but whine like anything when they’re on the receiving end of multiple podium shut outs. The medal counts in Montreal spell out very clearly why they changed. In all honesty, its only ever going to end up paying dividends for the USA 8-9 times out of 10.

Olympic baptism of fire can either make or break; there’s no surefire guarantee.

Taa
Reply to  commonwombat
13 days ago

The way I see it is that the olympics has outgrown its original intent which was to bring athletes from all nations together. When I was young they only allowed amateurs to participate. At this point they should do away with the athlete village and allow more participant to stay in hotels or whatever accommodations the country wants to provide. The podium sweep thing is long gone even all the talk of the women’s 100 back could be dominated by USA or the men’s 100 free when USA had all those guys under 48 turned to be a pipe dream.

So open it up and allow the top 25 in the world to invite themselves if they need to

Brownish
Reply to  The unoriginal Tim
13 days ago

In this case Hungary would win e.g the men’s 4×200 fly and would be on the podium in the women’s race. Rules are rules.

Jamie5678
Reply to  commonwombat
13 days ago

Normally agree with you commonwombat but not here sorry.

So here’s a question … Dekkers is ranked 9th in the world this year in 200 fly …

.. If Australia had a 17 year old who was the 9th fastest male 100m freestyler in a similar position – do you think they would have taken him?

Last edited 13 days ago by Jamie5678
commonwombat
Reply to  Jamie5678
13 days ago

Your counter isn’t an appropriate one given 100free feeds a 4×100 where at least top 4 will get a plane ticket. Second in stroke 100s are fairly straightforward if you have the QT or at least FINA A. With only a FINA B, its up to FINA as to where you’re seeded amongst the B times.

You are basing your argument that such a selection = an investment for the future. Sadly, its not always the case as there’s no guarantee she’ll be back next year. Every year sees a quota of age group shooting stars exit for whatever reasons; not always swimming related. Post Olympics, always sees a turnover and not all of it is top-end age related.

I… Read more »

Jamie5678
Reply to  commonwombat
13 days ago

Thanks for the reply commonwombat …

I thought that Dekkers had the A standard – she just didn’t swim it at the Australian trials. I’m pretty sure about that if not 100 percent so. I’d agree that they shouldn’t take her if she didn’t have the A standard.

My argument isn’t that it’s ‘an investment in the future’. I’d take her on the basis of the times she’s recorded, her world ranking, and the sense that 17 year olds are more likely -if certainly not guaranteed – to drop time suddenly.

I just think that the Australian selection policy is / was a bit strange. They set a very competitive QT standard. That’s fair enough – this – you… Read more »

Boomer
13 days ago

no point having semifinals…

Hswimmer
Reply to  Boomer
13 days ago

Right.. might as well just do prelim final

frug
Reply to  Braden Keith
13 days ago

With no fans, it probably comes down to what NBC wants, and I’m guessing the Peacock would want the semis so they can broadcast it in primetime.

Coach Mike 1952
Reply to  frug
13 days ago

lol Steve

Hswimmer
Reply to  Braden Keith
13 days ago

The real question is who really wants to swim 3 200m flys?

Dan
Reply to  Hswimmer
13 days ago

I guess not to many 🙂

Brownish
Reply to  Hswimmer
13 days ago

Milák and Kenderesi, for sure.

Comet
Reply to  Braden Keith
13 days ago

How many lanes are they using in prelims as opposed to semis and finals ? Is it 8 for all three rounds ? I recall in the world championships they have used 10 in the heats

DrSwimPhil
Reply to  Comet
12 days ago

8 for all rounds

Brownish
Reply to  Braden Keith
13 days ago

And Katinka would choose 200 fly, instead of 200 IM. Or who knows? 😉

Last edited 13 days ago by Brownish
commonwombat
Reply to  Boomer
13 days ago

Amen brother !!

Why on earth were these schedule clogging abominations ever brought back ??

Fastest 8 to final, everyone else watch from the bleachers is certainly cut-throat but it cuts to the chase ….. bring your A game or else.

People ask why multi-event swimmers don’t swim their full programs (or fuller programs) at World level meets …… here’s a prime factor.

He said what?
Reply to  commonwombat
13 days ago

Well said!

Mr Piano
Reply to  commonwombat
13 days ago

Yea, swimming would honestly be more exciting if semifinals were eliminated. There’s no real point to them other than to show you have endurance.

Hswimmer
Reply to  Mr Piano
13 days ago

FACTS! Waste of time

The unoriginal Tim
Reply to  Mr Piano
13 days ago

Recently most WRs seem to happen in semifinals due to pressure in the finals

Brownish
Reply to  The unoriginal Tim
13 days ago

And because of NBC perhaps. But in men’s 200 fly I could imagine a very easy 1:51 high in the prelims, a highly “controlled” 1.50 high with some headings 🙂 and a not so easy 1:49.8. We”ll see.

Last edited 13 days ago by Brownish
torchbearer
Reply to  Mr Piano
13 days ago

Or even drop the 200m event semis…..just 100m and 50m events. That would be a compromise.

Joel
Reply to  torchbearer
13 days ago

I like this idea. Can’t stand semis. Fondly remember when they didn’t exist.

ShamrockSwimmer
13 days ago

Surely the 400 IM would require far more scratches to bypass prelims as there are no semifinals for that event while there is for the 200 fly?

Sam B
13 days ago

what’s the relay only stuff?

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  Sam B
13 days ago

they’re swimming that distance of that stroke but only on a relay

Dan
Reply to  Sam B
13 days ago

Relay only counts towards the cap of 878, I did see that some of the swimmers designated as relay only have that designation for more then 1 relay (ex 4×100 F.R. & 4×200 F.R.).
What are the pro vs con of listing them as relay only for 2 relay events vs 1 relay event and maybe use them for the other relay as well?
If they are listed as RO for an event, they have to compete either in Prelims or Finals for the relay not to be disqualified. So I guess it comes down to how accurate the following thing is, can a swimmer that is entered as a RO ONLY compete in relays were they have… Read more »

Sam B
Reply to  Dan
13 days ago

it really doesn’t add more bodies to the ready room and the pool, relay count should be separate from the cap

Sam B
Reply to  Braden Keith
13 days ago

my wording was unfortunate and misleading. Let me reword it: It does.

Becky D
Reply to  Sam B
13 days ago

Because relay only swimmers don’t use deck space, lockers, showers, or warm up pool.

Brownish
Reply to  Becky D
13 days ago

LOL

swammer2009
13 days ago

Would love to see Hali get the gold medal here!

BearlyBreathing
13 days ago

>if Hosszu scratches, and she’s a prime candidate to do so after declaring a false start in prelims of the event in Tokyo, there would only be 16 entries.

Is this a typo or was time travel involved?

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  BearlyBreathing
13 days ago

also wasn’t a false start, she no showed the heats to focus on the 200 im

swimapologist
Reply to  Old Man Chalmers
13 days ago

What you’ve just described is known as “declaring a false start.” No-showing at the Olympics gets you in trouble, so they made up a cockamanie rule many years ago allowing swimmers to go to the official and say “I false start” rather than getting on the block and actually false starting and messing with everyone else’s race.

I’m not sure if they actually have to go to the official and say it anymore, but there’s some process to declare a false start that is essentially a post-scratch-deadline-scratch, or as you would say a “no-show”.

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  swimapologist
13 days ago

yes, but the article linked clearly says that hosszu was a no show. “Hosszu didn’t scratch the event prior to the session, nor did she give a reason for the no-show, so she’ll receive a charge of 100 Swiss francs.”

Brownish
Reply to  Old Man Chalmers
13 days ago

She scratched it.

Mike
Reply to  swimapologist
13 days ago

Declared false starts are a US cockamamie rule. There’s no such thing at FINA meets, it’s either a withdrawal (scratch) before the meet starts, or a no-swim with a fine.

Brownish
Reply to  BearlyBreathing
13 days ago

DNS-ed

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

Read More »