Official 2017 NCAA Men’s Championship Psych Sheets Released

The official psych sheets for the 2017 NCAA Men’s Swimming & Diving Championships have been released, which for the first time verifies the athletes and relays who are invited to compete in the swimming side of the meet. After some back-and-forth from the NCAA about whether or not to allow times from the ECAC championship meet to count, things have settled exactly where they started: The top 29 swimmers in each event have been invited, plus the 2 best from the 30 line.

Once a swimmer is invited in an individual event, they can then compete in any other event in which they have a “B” time, up to the maximum of 3 (or 2 if they are to swim 5 relays).

These lists can still change – by way of swimmers scratching. There’s usually at least one of those each season, though thus far the women’s meet, for what it’s worth, haven’t seen any in 2017.

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He Gets It Done Again
4 years ago

SEC: 64
Pac-12: 54
ACC: 46
B1G: 33
Big 12: 15

212 swimmers (90.2%) came from “Power 5” conferences.

23 swimmers came from other schools, including 8 from the Ivy League.

Harambe
Reply to  He Gets It Done Again
4 years ago

Is Big XII really just all the Texas guys? Anyone else from that conference make it?

ono
Reply to  Harambe
4 years ago

No other team/team members from the Big12 made it other than Texas

Wahooswimfan
Reply to  ono
4 years ago

Its just a matter of time before the Big12 falls apart – Texas and Oklahoma will go to other conferences (SEC or PAC12) and the rest of the schools will be scrambling to find a place or will become part of a residual non power conference.

Swimmer
Reply to  Harambe
4 years ago

Harambe, the big 12 is a very strong conference in other sports. It is far from falling apart. For example men’s and women’s basketball, cross country, track etc. it is actually regarded by many as the toughest men’s basketball conference in the country

newswim
Reply to  He Gets It Done Again
4 years ago

Half of those from the Ivy League are from Harvard, plus three invited relays.

Bigly
Reply to  newswim
4 years ago

Well, none are from Princeton, so that’s not much of a surprise.

School
Reply to  He Gets It Done Again
4 years ago

Average number of invited swimmers per men’s team in each conference:
SEC-6.4
Pac-12: 8
ACC-3.8
B1G-3.3
Big 12-5

Wahooswimfan
4 years ago

Something seems amiss – if they are supposed to take an even number from each event, how can the alternate list include multiple swimmers for the same event – e.g. 200 FL, 400IM, 100 BK, 1650 Free? and searching the psych sheet – many of the “alternates” are not even listed on the psyche sheet?

KDSwim
Reply to  Wahooswimfan
4 years ago

Here is the rule once they can’t put a swimmer in each event without going over 235 swimmers…

“At some point, the addition of one competitor per event to the entire order of individual events will put the field
over the total number of competitors cap. At this point, the remaining spaces will be allocated by comparing
the Division I championships record time for each individual event divided by the next entry time on the list.
The competitor who has the highest percentage (closest to the record) will be taken first, and so on until the
cap has been reached. *Please see the procedures below for breaking ties at the final selection spot.”

So after all… Read more »

Wahooswimfan
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

Thanks for clarifying – so you could conceivably have all 10 alternates from one event if those were the next 10 closest by percentage?

just an observation
4 years ago

Big10 is heavy in all the freestyle events

50/100/ 200/ 500/ 1650
# of participants by conference
Big10-4/4/3/3/3
ACC-1/2/2/2/3
SEC-3/3/1/2/2
Big12-1/0/1/2/1
Pac12-1/1/2/1/1
Ivy-0/0/1/0/0

Gators
Reply to  just an observation
4 years ago

Don’t know how you counted numbers, but UF has 4 guys in the 1650 alone

pine tree
Reply to  just an observation
4 years ago

Psych sheet PAC12 in freestyle events:
50 – 6
100 – 4
200 – 7
500 – 5
1650 – 4
That’s what I counted anyway. Didn’t count other conferences……
Did I misunderstand ?

CoachD
Reply to  just an observation
4 years ago

Is this accurate? Just glancing at the 50 free, I see 7 (3 auto, 4 invited) participants from the Big 12. You have listed 1.

Another Swim Nerd
Reply to  just an observation
4 years ago

The Ivy League also has a swimmer in each freestyle event.

David Berkoff
Reply to  just an observation
4 years ago

Ivy has two in the mile, one on 50.

gator
4 years ago

the times of the alternates are ridiculous…amazing that at least for now they aren’t invited…doesn’t make sense to me that NCAA Div 1 women have bigger invite list (yes i know its their day but just saying…..)

dmswim
Reply to  gator
4 years ago

The number of invites are based on the total number of athletes in a sport across the NCAA. That’s why more women get invited. They have more competition.

WaitAMinute
Reply to  dmswim
4 years ago

As a result of Title 9 which has effectively cut men’s swimming from being able to fledge as many teams

dmswim
Reply to  WaitAMinute
4 years ago

I’ll fix this for you–“As a result of outrageous football and basketball budgets which have effectively cut men’s swimming from being able to fledge as many teams.”

Years of Plain Suck
Reply to  dmswim
4 years ago

@DMSwim I’ll fix this for you. At most D1 universities, the basketball program pays for itself, and the revenue from football pays for itself and all other sports.

Thesilentmajority
Reply to  Years of Plain Suck
4 years ago
O_O
Reply to  Years of Plain Suck
4 years ago

That’s not true at all. It’s barely true for less than 10 schools and even in those cases the math is fishy. They leave out costs all over the place. Athletic training, tutoring, etc. are often not included in budgets to make them looks smaller.

dmswim
Reply to  Years of Plain Suck
4 years ago

Are you delusional? Please give me some stats on this to back up your ridiculous claim. The article “THESILENTMAJORITY” cites below shows you are wrong.

University of Chicago football
Reply to  dmswim
4 years ago

At many universities, no football program = no swim program, no cross country program, no gymnastics program, no volleyball program, and so on. You could eliminate football (i.e., University of Chicago) and let the chips fall where they may with all other sports from a funding perspective. You’d end up with DIII/NAIA-level, club sports, and intramurals at many universities.

dmswim
Reply to  University of Chicago football
4 years ago

I’m not advocating cutting football completely; I’m just advocating more responsible spending. So many schools funnel donations and budgets into recruiting lounges at stadiums, complete weight room remodels every 5 years, and excessive staffs who travel with the teams for football and basketball. This kind of spending is unnecessary and I doubt is the reason recruits choose a school. They choose a school based on how good the team is, how much playing time they will get, and the coaching staff. Nice facilities are important, but after a certain minimum standard, I doubt they make that much of a difference.

David Berkoff
Reply to  WaitAMinute
4 years ago

Title IX does not cut men’s swimming. Title IX equalizes resources spent on men’s and women’s activities at universities and public schools. The problem lies in the sports on which schools spend their resources. Football accounts for 80-120 Scholarships and a huge budget. That leaves ver little for other sports.

dmswim
Reply to  David Berkoff
4 years ago

Yes and there isn’t an equivalent women’s sport of that size so to equalize resources, more women’s sports must be offered. Thanks for your explanation!

jay ryan
Reply to  David Berkoff
4 years ago

Some have suggested that excluding football from the NCAA, and having it under the auspices of a separate independent organization such as the CFA, could exclude the 85 football scholarships from NCAA consideration. This would allow for greater male:female equality in the NCAA Title IX “non-football” sports. This of course would be against the spirit of Title IX. Amortizing the football scholarships as representing, perhaps 1/2 a scholarship could even out the Title IX mandates taking into account the unintended consequences of football’s uneven scholarship requirements. This practical compromise would be akin to counting divers as 1/2 of a participant to an NCAA or Championship roster—an ingenious maneuver that prevents divers from being excluded by myopic swimming coaches. In lieu… Read more »

just an observation
4 years ago

**Correction top 10 in the events

marklewis
4 years ago

Yes, wouldn’t it be great for Jack Conger to win an NCAA title. He swims so many events well, but hasn’t reached the top of the podium.

Maybe the 200 fly this year will be his triumph.

Lane Four
Reply to  marklewis
4 years ago

Are there really this many anti-Conger people on SwimSwam? How does this even rate ONE down vote?

Bigly
Reply to  Lane Four
4 years ago

I believe the down votes were STATE-ments.

Swimmer
Reply to  Bigly
4 years ago

Conger is considering training at NC State next year. He wants to get far far away from Schooling and get back home to the east coast. With Eddie getting close to retirinment it might be time to move on. NC State has the hottest thing going on right now.

Bigly
Reply to  Swimmer
4 years ago

Ummm… he’s a senior and won’t have any college eligibility left. Otherwise, it was a brilliant comment, especially the “retirinment” part.

Zanna
Reply to  Lane Four
4 years ago

The ones who down voted are Schooling fans.

Obee
Reply to  Lane Four
4 years ago

Have you ever met Conger? Just wondering. He might be a great guy but doesn’t come across well. Not just my observation. I’m not a fan.

Team Rwanda
Reply to  Lane Four
4 years ago

I am not Anti-conger at all. I downvoted because people say these things as if Conger was entitled to a NCAA title to start with. He was present the last 3 competitions, and if he didn’t get it is because he wasn’t good enough. And there are plenty other who are going to finish college without evn a medal so conger’s situation is not that bad

Bigly
Reply to  Team Rwanda
4 years ago

Pretty sure he can still shine his Olympic gold medal.

aswimfan
Reply to  Lane Four
4 years ago

I am not anti-Conger and certainly not pro-Schooling. But, I also don’t see where Conger deserves to win any more than any other swimmer who works hard, has a good attitude, etc. Conger has accomplished WAY more than most other college swimmers and his college career should not be viewed in any lesser terms if he doesn’t ever finish on top of the podium. Sorry, I don’t feel bad for him – he’s had a great career and gone to the Olympics, etc. – done many things that others (even others who “deserve” it equally as much) will ever dream of.

I would love to see him finish ahead of Schooling, but I don’t think he deserves a win… Read more »

Person
Reply to  marklewis
4 years ago

I think this is his year. The 200 fly he swam at conferences was insanely fast and I went a little under the radar. And everyone knows Texas brings their best to NCAAs. Eddie said that Schooling took a while to get back to training, and while I don’t doubt his speed I feel like his endurance isn’t quite as good as Conger’s.

Mr Sandals
4 years ago

Wow, am I reading correctly that Olympic 4th place finisher Santo Condorelli did not qualify in the 100 freestyle?

Robert Gibbs
Reply to  Mr Sandals
4 years ago

Condorelli qualified in the 50 free and the 100 fly, meaning he was below the cut line (invited times) for those events. Since he has a ‘B’ time in the 100 free, he will be able to swim that as well. So, his 100 free time was not what got him “invited” to NCAA’s, but he will still (presumably) swim it.

Mr Sandals
Reply to  Robert Gibbs
4 years ago

Got it, thanks for the reply. I thought a swimmer needed an “A” cut for their “B” times to come into play. Should have read the article more closely.

Hambone
4 years ago

I know I’m not the first to say it but, to me, NCAA’s is more exciting and interesting than anything else in swimming, including Olympics.

Bigly
Reply to  Hambone
4 years ago

Don’t get Bobo started on the “bathtub.”

bobo gigi
Reply to  Bigly
4 years ago

You can have a great show even in a bathtub! 🙂

But sorry guys. Even if I like watching these college races now much more than a few years ago, I don’t buy that it’s more interesting than olympic games. Please let’s stay serious. It’s just different. It’s all about the team and for that reason it’s very interesting. We see most of best American swimmers and that’s great. But it’s a different sport. I will always prefer watching someone really talented beat someone less talented in the big pool while the opposite is possible in yards where underwaters take a huge part and real swimming is less important. And nothing can replace the fact that the best swimmers of… Read more »

Bigly
Reply to  bobo gigi
4 years ago

If you take Phelps out of all the recent Olympics, not sure the Olympics are really more interesting. Especially as more international stars compete at NCAAs: you get to see them PLUS more than just two of the fastest US stars. Sure Peaty’s fun to watch, but it’s one event. Same with Ervin, Adrian, and Flo in the 50. Ledecky’s great, but what’s interesting about watching someone annihilate the field in a distance event? You take the NBCSports story line of Phelps out, and suddenly the Olympics loses a lot of appeal. There’s nothing more ridiculous than seeing one of the very fastest (Cielo, Vlad, Dressel) swim the 50 free SCY. It’s like watching a speedboat.

AvidSwimFan
Reply to  bobo gigi
4 years ago

Agreed 100%. Yes the NCAAs are fun but no way can they be compared to the olympics. Part of the fun of NCAAs is speculating how well the athletes will do on the world stage with the biggest stage being the Olympics.

tea rex
Reply to  bobo gigi
4 years ago

It does not have the glory of the Olympics, and I prefer long course, but the NCAA meet format is much more fun.
1. No semifinals! (There are B finals, but nobody coasts)
2. Five relays.
3. A guy like Murphy or Schooling might swim 14 races in 3 days.
4. Team scoring.
5. Rosters change every year.

And, last years’ men’s 1650.

Bigly
Reply to  tea rex
4 years ago

“And last year’s men’s 1650.” Especially with Rowdy’s commentary. Lapped or winner?

Taa
Reply to  Hambone
4 years ago

I think its where you see the real development happen for swimmers on their way to International and Olympic success. This years example is Cameron Craig. Last year it was Townley Haas

Ex Quaker
Reply to  Taa
4 years ago

Dean Farris.

completelyconquered
Reply to  Ex Quaker
4 years ago

#SaveFarris

Bigly
Reply to  Taa
4 years ago

Or you watch someone fall on their face but still come back for Olympic success —- Clark Smith last year.

JJG
Reply to  Hambone
4 years ago

I mean… I personally prefer ncaas. It’s shorter, faster the crazy underwaters are enjoyable to watch too. Also since SCY is what I swim in every day it’s just easier to relate to. Nothing to take away from the Olympics it’s just a preference thing. Also I disagree with the fact that a swimmer is more talented if they dominate long course opposed to dominating short course. They’re two different skills frankly and certain people are better at one or the other.

Hambone
Reply to  Hambone
4 years ago

The team competition adds so much – the excitement and interest in seeing who finishes 7th or 9th, etc. is way beyond those same results in the Olympics.

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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