NCAA Decision Overturned, ECAC Results Reinstated for NCAA Qualifying

Update: new pre-selection psych sheets have been posted. Still no response from the NCAA.

The head coach of a team that competed at last weekend’s ECAC meet has told SwimSwam that the decision to remove times from the meet for NCAA qualifying has been overturned. This would mean that the two swimmers eliminated upon the revised release of the psych sheet yesterday are expected to be reinstated.

According to the coach, NCAA championship coordinator Mary Berdo called coaches on Tuesday to inform them that the meet’s times wouldn’t count. The flaw in the interpretation appears to be that Berdo believed that the meet was a “last chance meet,” which it was not approved to be, when everyone else treated it as a conference championship meet, which wouldn’t need separate NCAA approval. Only meets that come after conference championship meets require special approval, as compared to just meeting the normal NCAA guidelines for bona fied competition.

Berdo has not responded to two emails requesting clarification on the matter. No updated psych sheet has been released yet.

The primary impact of the change is that Towson’s Jack Saunderson would be reinstated as the 26th-best time in the 200 butterfly, which will earn him an invite, and Loyola (MD) swimmer Ben Cono is reinstated as the 23rd-best 100 breaststroker, which will also earn him an invite. Barring other changes, that means that Georgia’s Clayton Forde and Texas A&M’s Angel Martinez would return to the alternate list.

 

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LostInTheSauce
4 years ago

Thank god, that was a ridiculous initial ruling. Cost a number of swimmers invite times/b cuts that were swum legally with no cause for disqualification.

AvidSwimFan
4 years ago

This is what I like to hear. Wrongs being made right. There is hope yet for NCAA as a bureaucracy. Now all I need to see is the official lists.

Steve Schaffer
4 years ago

One has to wonder how this all came about. Neither the ECAC meet nor Ms. Berdo are new to the NCAA landscape. The ECAC meet is held on the same weekend as other conference meets. If there needed to be any clarification as to whether the ECAC meet needed to be defined as a last chance meet after a long history of not being treated as such, that should have been dealt with proactively by the Swimming & Diving Committee, NOT after the meet was held. Glad reason finally won out!

JP input is too short
Reply to  Steve Schaffer
4 years ago

I think that generally, guys don’t qualify for NCAAs at ECACs.

The teams that go are generally in three colors – teams that sometimes have a guy or two on the bubble but usually go all-in at their smaller conference meets a few weeks before (Towson, Loyola, Rider, etc), teams that don’t ever have people qualify for the big meet (Binghampton, VMI, Maine, etc), and teams that are good (UVa, Navy, Penn, etc) but send their non-conference teams there.

So I guess it was probably a bit of a different situation than usual. But yeah, it’s good that reason won out.

jay ryan
Reply to  JP input is too short
4 years ago

FYI, Binghamton sent David Holmes to the NCAA in 2007 with a 1:35.5 in the 200 Free. Just saying. There are diamonds in every rough.

JP input is too short
Reply to  jay ryan
4 years ago

Hmmm, thanks for the history lesson. I missed that.

Swimbor
Reply to  JP input is too short
4 years ago

Navy men qualified the 400 Medley Relay in 2014

1anda2
4 years ago

Towson competed in the CAA championships the week before. That would make the ECAC meet after their conference championship and subject to the Last Chance rule, no? Or do teams get 2 conference championship meets? Maybe Florida and Indiana should just enter the Pac 12 meet as a back up next year.

1anda2
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

Would be interesting to see if anyone has qualified from this meet in the recent past. So has this come up and not been challenged or it just hasn’t been an issue.

UVAfan
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

Eryn Eddy from UVA went 48.58 in the 100 free at ECACs to qualify for NCAAs. This was after competing at the ACC championships earlier that year.

Reid
Reply to  1anda2
4 years ago

I know Lovro Bilonic qualified for St Peters at ECACs a few years ago, not sure if any others.

jay ryan
Reply to  Reid
4 years ago

Geez, there is a lot of cumulative swimming knowledge on this site. I guess we all should get a life, but passions are passions.

dmswim
Reply to  1anda2
4 years ago

Francesca Stoppa from Rutgers qualified in the 200 butterfly last year at ECACs after having failed to qualify at Big 10s.

Tom shields 43
Reply to  1anda2
4 years ago

I’m not sure if this is why but just speculation. The CAA meet and many other conference meets don’t allow for teams to bring their nonscoring swimmers to swim at the same championship like what was allowed at PAC12 resulting in zdroiks qualifying in the 100 fly. So this meet is for many teams non conference or non scoring swimmers to swim. I don’t know if that has to do with it or not

1anda2
Reply to  Tom shields 43
4 years ago

Would make sense for swimmers in that situation, but in this case at least one of the qualifying swimmers in question (Saunderson) did compete at the CAA meet as a scoring swimmer.

JP input is too short
Reply to  1anda2
4 years ago

Cono swam at his conference meet too.

Hmmmmm
4 years ago

So it wasn’t a designated last chance meet but Towson and Loyola get to have two conference championships? Can of worms officially opened

Hmmmm
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

100% agree even when we have benefited from them

Caleb
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

Why are they a problem? Assuming appropriate standards, officiating, timing, etc….

KDSwim
Reply to  Caleb
4 years ago

Seems they are an advantage to in particular the SEC swimmers as if they are sick, have a bad swim, or mess up taper than can try again almost 3 weeks later. PAC 12 swimmers champs are last weekend so no “retry”. Of course the SEC swimmers don’t know what they will ultimately need to get in, versus PAC 12 where they have a pretty good idea (if knowing what you time you need helps you).
Not sure if students/families have to pay for attending these last chance meets, or the colleges cover them, that could impact less well off swimmers.

KDSwim
Reply to  KDSwim
4 years ago

I sure wish there was a way to edit comments for stupid typos, even if only for a few minutes after post.

chloriNation
4 years ago

Such a shame the reinstated swimmers and coaches had to go through this aggravation. I am glad that fairness prevailed and NCAA did the right thing. Go Cono! Go Sauderson!

barbotus
Reply to  chloriNation
4 years ago

Absolutely agree that the right decision was reached. But I do feel a bit bad for the two kids who thought that they were in for the last 12-24 hours, after the initial ruling. I understand that the psych sheets are preliminary and that changes happen, but it’s still a raw deal to hear that you’re in and then you’re out.

jay ryan
Reply to  barbotus
4 years ago

I hope the outcry from Braden’s articles may have had a little to do with the reversal. At least it wasn’t fake news.

AvidSwimFan
Reply to  barbotus
4 years ago

Considering that there were students who also thought they were in 24 hours prior, only to wake up to being told their last effort at a standardized meet were nullified, I don’t feel too bad. The former losing their spots would have been a greater injustice imo.

gator
4 years ago

At the end of the day, this is about the kids – Great fix!

Swimmer A
4 years ago

Woohoo!! Some Maryland teams just got themselves into the meet.

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder/co-owner of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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