Jamal Hill Breaks 11-Year-Old American Para-Swimming Record at California Classic

Less than a month after breaking seven American records at the Australian Short Course Championships, U.S. Paralympic swimmer Jamal Hill broke another national mark — this one a long course standard set back in 2011 — at the California Classic in Yucaipa on Sunday. 

Competing in the SB9 classification, Hill won the 50-meter breaststroke final with a time of 34.00, taking down Jacob Hansen’s 11-year-old record of 34.30. Hill is now the owner of five long course American records and 12 overall including short course marks.

The California Classic is an annual open meet held at Crafton Hills College, the same competition where Hill made his Para swimming debut four years ago. Hill also tallied first-place finishes over the weekend in the 50 free (26.20) and 50 fly (29.15). 

“What I love most about this meet is that it allows Paralympians like myself to meet and encourage the next generation of U.S. para-swimmers,” said Hill, a 27-year-old Los Angeles native. “I think it’s definitely one of the more fun competitions on the circuit and a great opportunity to gauge where you’re at in the season.”

Hill represented the U.S. last summer at the Tokyo Paralympics, where he won a bronze medal in the 50-meter freestyle under the S9 classification. His time of 25.19 still stands as the American record. Hill won the same medal in June at the World Championships, where he clocked three more national records in the 100 free S9 (56.16), the 4×100 mixed freestyle relay, and the 4×100 mixed medley relay. Last month, his seven short course American records came in the 50 free, 100 free, 200 free, 50 back, 100 back, 50 fly, and 50 breast.

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Taa
2 months ago

SB9 is the least disabled class for breaststroke. It is calculated separately from the freestyle and the IM classifications. I think he was an S10 for freestyle and got his class lowered to S9 at some point. Most para swimming records are set by swimmers who are favorably classified…thats just how the sport works and I doubt this will ever change.

Paul
Reply to  Taa
2 months ago

He is a S9 swimmer who should be a S10

Jules
2 months ago

While he is a fierce competitor in the pool, on deck Jamal is the nicest guy and mentor for the up-and-coming para swimmers. And he wants to teach 1 million people to swim!

Judge
2 months ago

Congrats, S10 breaks another S9

Judge
2 months ago

Another S10 swimmer breaking a S9 record

Basil
2 months ago

What a joke! S10 all the way

Paraswim fan
Reply to  Basil
2 months ago

How does his disability impact his swimming? Isn’t an SB9 the usual classification for a S10 swimmer (S10/SM10/SB9)

Basil
Reply to  Paraswim fan
2 months ago

His disability doesn’t impact him whatsoever. His teammates say he cheated the classification system. He kicks white water during all this races yet claims he has an impairment with his legs. He’s going against athletes with one leg! How unfair. He should be embarrassed.

Paraswim fan
Reply to  Basil
2 months ago

I haven’t seen him swim up close, but anyone with a slight medical background can look at his legs and see the “stork effect” from his charcot marie tooth. His calves don’t have the mass and definition of an able bodied athlete. Is his classification confirmed? He could potentially swap back.

xman
Reply to  Paraswim fan
2 months ago

No medical background – but is neurological where he doesn’t have feeling or is limited below the knee and from his elbows to hands.

From what I understood some actions can make it worse – so he might have no feeling vs some feeling. His coach changed his training to prevent inflammation.

gary hall sr
2 months ago

Congratulations, Jamal! All of us at The Race Club are so proud of you.

About Riley Overend

Riley is an associate editor interested in the stories taking place outside of the pool just as much as the drama between the lane lines. A 2019 graduate of Boston College, he arrived at SwimSwam in April of 2022 after three years as a sports reporter and sports editor at newspapers …

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