Claire Curzan Goes Under NAG Record with 47.2 100 FR, Hits PR 1:53.3 in 200 FL

TAC TITANS INTRASQUAD TIME TRIAL

  • July 17-19, 2020
  • Triangle Aquatic Center, Cary, North Carolina
  • 25y (SCY) pool
  • Live Stream
  • Results on Meet Mobile: “TAC TITANS July Intrasquad Meet”

Claire Curzan, who has already gone faster than 15-16 NAG records in the 50 free (21.51) and 100 fly (50.03) this weekend, has done it again.

This time, the 16-year-old edged out the 15-16 NAG record in the 100 free, shaving four-tenths of a second off of her old best to go 47.23. Curzan, who took the race out in a 22.4 at the flip, utilized strong underwaters and posted a time better than Gretchen Walsh‘s official NAG mark of 47.49 from 2019.

There was an empty lane to her right (she raced in lane five), but male swimmers populated the other six lanes in the heat. Right now, it’s unknown if Curzan’s swims this weekend will count for NAG records.

Though Curzan has only recently turned 16, and still has the better half of a year until she enters the 17-18 age group, she would rank fifth among 17-18 historical top performers, just .06 behind Missy Franklin (47.17).

In the heat after, 17-year-old Michael Cotter broke 45 seconds for the first time ever, going 44.80.

Curzan wasn’t done yet, though, competing in the 200 fly after taking the 200 breast timed finals to recover and rest. Though she had to really hold tough on the final 50 (30.4), Curzan was out in 53.6 at the 100 and hit the final wall at 1:53.59, a lifetime best by seven-tenths.

Curzan is now the #3 performer in 15-16 history in this race, behind only Regan Smith (1:51.24) and Mary T. Meagher (1:52.99).

CLAIRE CURZAN‘S WEEKEND

  • 50 free – 21.51 (-0.26)
  • 100 free – 47.23 (-0.44)
  • 100 fly – 50.03 (-0.32)
  • 200 fly – 1:53.59 (-0.77)
  • 100 back – 51.01 (-0.22)

16-year-old Lance Norris took a second off of his old best to win the 200 back with a time of 1:45.78. He’s gone lifetime bests in every race this meet: the 500 free (4:24.19), 200 IM (1:50.81), the 200 free (1:40.07) and now the 200 back. Norris then posted a 2:06.03 for yet another best in the 200 breast two events later.

Second in the 200 back was another 16-year-old, Braeden Haughey, just off of his best at 1:47.92.

16-year-old Charlotte Hook took over seven-tenths of a second off of her old 100 free PR of 50.71 to post a new best of 49.98. She’s had a strong meet this weekend, but her sprints have looked the best, she has hit bests in the 100 and 50 free (22.81). In the 200 fly, Hook posted a time of 1:54.66, just under a second away from her best of 1:53.70. Hook was only out in a 56.79, but she came home in a 29.6/28.1 (57.87) after going out 26.8/29.9.

OTHER NOTABLE PERFORMANCES

  • Colombian record-holder and Olympian Jorge Murillo clocked a 1:57.87 to easily take the 200 breast. He was just eight-tenths off of his lifetime best of 1:57.01 from March.
  • Anya Mostek, who came into the meet with a best of 2:01.06, dropped to a 1:57.21 in the 200 back. She was the highest finisher on the girls’ side. Mostek had been living in Pennsylvania and training with the Phoenixville Branch YMCA through this spring, but she appears to have made the move to the TAC Titans.
  • Virginia ’25 commit Caroline Pennington, who has also recently switched clubs (from Badger Swim Club in New York), hit a lifetime best 2:02.92 in the 200 back, a six-plus second drop. She also took almost two seconds off of her 100 free best tonight with a 52.62. This weekend, she’s gone lifetime bests in all of her other events as well: the 200 free (1:52.01), 500 free (4:47.92), 100 back (59.42) and 50 free (24.43).

In This Story

38
Leave a Reply

Subscribe
Notify of
38 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Seth
1 year ago

My god is she fast

swimswimswim
1 year ago

That speed in so many events. How many college athletes are that fast in so many different stroke sprints?

Nswim
Reply to  swimswimswim
1 year ago

Honestly I don’t know but I give her a chance of being ranked #1 in the class re-ranks with these performances

PK Doesn't Like His Long Name
Reply to  Nswim
1 year ago

Not quite yet probably. Regan, Ledecky, and Missy all had times coming out of their junior year of high school that would have been good enough to win at NCAAs that very year. Claire isn’t quite there, although she is getting a lot closer.

WaWho?
Reply to  swimswimswim
1 year ago

I have to think that the only college swimmers this year faster than her in so many different events would be Erika Brown at Tennessee (21.0 / 45.8 / 1:41 Freestyles and 49.3 Butterfly / 50.8 Backstroke) and Maggie MacNiel at Michigan (21.30 / 46.5 Freestyles / and 50.0 Backstroke / 49.2 Butterfly).

I can’t think of any other athletes as versatile in terms of speed as she is at that level!

Hannah
Reply to  WaWho?
1 year ago

Louise Hansson 21.6/47.1 free 49.2 fly and 50.8 back

Supafly23
1 year ago

I would like one Claire Curzan signature swim tether please.

SwimmerTX
1 year ago

What’d she have for breakfast? Lmk pls

OG Prodigy
Reply to  SwimmerTX
1 year ago

…asking for a friend 🙂

Swimmerj
1 year ago

Literally kept refreshing swimswam for this article on the last day of this meet. Thank you to Claire for giving us fans some crazy news again🙌🏼

Miss M
1 year ago

Seriously great swimming!

Surely there is no way they can count the times as records? Isn’t the whole premise of not allowing women to set records in mixed events based on their ability to swim faster when racing men who are faster than them?

Swim&PoloDad
Reply to  Miss M
1 year ago

Huh?

swimgeek
Reply to  Swim&PoloDad
1 year ago

Drafting

Swim mom
Reply to  swimgeek
1 year ago

When you draft you actually have to be BEHIND the boys and in many cases she led the pack!

Admin
Reply to  Swim mom
1 year ago

This is true – she won her heat in the 100 free.

Anonymous
Reply to  swimgeek
1 year ago

I believe that the TAC pool that is known to have a drafting advantage in certain lanes as well.

NC Swim Fan
Reply to  Anonymous
1 year ago

Lol. While TAC is known for an outside smoke current that could benefit a 50 Free LCM, I’d love the story on how there is a ‘drafting advantage’ for certain lanes, and especially in SCY.

Texas Tap Water
Reply to  Swim&PoloDad
1 year ago

Read the rules

VA Steve
Reply to  Miss M
1 year ago

Doubtful they will count. The rules cover events that are swum—100FR Men/100 FR Women. It is a debate between the implicit (there are no mixed gender events other than relays) and the explicit (what the rules literally say). If they do count, look for a large number of mixed events of all strokes as it definitely benefits Women swimmers to have faster men in their heats.

Incredible swims and swimmer.

NC Swim Fan
Reply to  VA Steve
1 year ago

USA swimming rules clearly state that local meet sanctions can permit seeding by time without respect to age or gender. The Age Group recognition section of the rulebook does not include an exception for records swam by females in mixed heats. FINA but would be an issue, but this is ‘just’ USA swimming rules so nothing in the rulebook prevents it from counting. The debate is if the USA Swimming July meet sanction limitation on times only counting for LSC qualification applies to records or just meet qualification.

VA Steve
Reply to  NC Swim Fan
1 year ago

I’d be interested in other examples of NAGs set in this kind of format. As I said, the issue is going forward if they do count you will have an awful lot of mixed events in the future as it is obviously helpful. If that’s a good thing, then bring it on.

Greg
Reply to  Miss M
1 year ago

I’m baffled why they don’t have her swim in a girls-only heat or by herself, when NAG records are at stake. Either they think they’ll count as records or they don’t care about them.

Admin
Reply to  Greg
1 year ago

Maybe. On the other hand, her goals are undoubtedly bigger than NAG Records at this point. In a heat of all girls, she would have won by several seconds, which doesn’t sharpen her racing composure when she’s at, for example, the Olympic Trials.

Besides, we still don’t know if the records would have counted even in a heat of all girls.

NC Swim Fan
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 year ago

Gotta agree with Braden. At some point for someone of Claire’s talent, NAGs can’t retain the same allure they do for the rest of us mere mortals. When you start thinking olympics, worlds and are a top ten performer of all time, those have to trump being the fastest 16 year old American girl.

VA Steve
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 year ago

On that we can agree. The NAG is not that important as (1) she will break them eventually anyway and (2) she has bigger fish to fry.

sleepy
Reply to  VA Steve
1 year ago

Lol, the NAGs were already hers. At least in two of the races.

sleepy
Reply to  Greg
1 year ago

The only NAG record that was “at stake” was the 100 free, as she already had the 50 free and 100 fly records before lowering them at this meet. And none of us were really counting on best times at this meet, anyway. This was about having fun and racing. Just about as lowkey as it gets.

Billy
1 year ago

If I was going to try and make the 2021 Olympic team, this girl would make me real nervous. Real nervous.

VA Steve
Reply to  Billy
1 year ago

No doubt. But first one out of the gate.

10U DAD
1 year ago

I don’t know if I’m blind again or if it’s not reported, but did Claire win the overall or her heat? I have to agree with @Missy M that putting a girl in a heat with all boys definitely “CAN” turn up the heat. I say CAN because in 99% of all age group swim meets, the girls are way faster than the boys – especially at 10U and 12U. I do plainly see on the USA Swimming Age Group Records page that the boys hold the faster records in all events but one – but by the slimmest of margins. So, I’m saying that if you put the nation’s #1 girl against the nation”s #1 boy then the boy… Read more »

M d e
Reply to  10U DAD
1 year ago

Curzan is 16.

A solid national level16 year old male will swim faster times than world class open women.

By 12/13 males are faster than females and the gap only grows from there.

About Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, graduating in May of 2018. He began swimming on a club team in first grade and swam four years for Wesleyan.

Read More »