Beata Nelson Had a Suit Rip Before 100 Back AR (Video)

2019 WOMEN’S DIVISION I NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS

Reported by Lauren Neidigh.

WOMEN’S 100 BACK:

  • NCAA Record: Beata Nelson (Wisconsin), 2018- 49.67
  • American Record: Regan Smith, 2019- 49.66
  • Meet Record: Ally Howe (Stanford), 2018- 49.70

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL RESULTS:

  1. GOLD: Beata Nelson, Wisconsin, 49.18
  2. SILVER: Amy Bilquist, Cal, 50.05
  3. BRONZE: Taylor Ruck, Stanford, 50.34
  4. Izzy Ivey, Cal, 50.42
  5. Asia Seidt, Kentucky, 50.68
  6. Maggie MacNeil, Michigan, 50.98
  7. Sherridon Dressel, Florida, 51.03
  8. Aly Tetzloff, Auburn, 51.33

Wisconsin’s Beata Nelson was flying under record pace with a 23.76 at the 50. Nelson followed through with the fastest time in history, crushing the American Record by almost half a second in 49.18. That makes her 2-for-2 in individual titles here. Nelson broke her own NCAA Record tonight, but took back the American Record after Regan Smith broke Nelson’s mark earlier this month. Nelson has now broken 50 for the 5th time in her career and owns 5 of the all-time top 10 performances.

Cal’s Amy Bilquist took almost half a second off her best, closing in on the 50-barrier with a 50.05 for 2nd. She’s now the 10th fastest in history. Stanford freshman Taylor Ruck took 3rd here, posting another lifetime best on the back end of her double. Ruck reached in in 50.34, just out-touching Cal freshman Izzy Ivey, who also swam a best time on the back end of a double in 50.42. There was a 3rd freshman to swim this as their 2nd individual race tonight. Michigan’s Maggie MacNeil finished 6th in 50.98.

Kentucky’s Asia Seidt nabbed a school record, dropping a couple of tenths from her best in 50.68 for 5th place. Florida’s Sherridon Dressel was just a tenth shy of her best to give the Gators their highest finish since 2016, placing 7th in 51.03. Auburn’s Aly Tetzloff, the SEC champion, was 8th in 51.33. Tetzloff also competed in the 100 fly earlier.

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About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

Coleman started his journey in the water at age 1, and although he actually has no memory of that, something must have stuck. A Missouri native, he joined the Columbia Swim Club at age 9, where he is still remembered for his stylish dragon swim trunks. After giving up on …

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