Anna Elendt Breaks Texas School Record in 100 Breast Ahead of Jacoby’s Arrival

2021 MINNESOTA INVITE

University of Texas sophomore Anna Elendt swam a 57.90 in the 100 breaststroke on Friday to win the race at the Minnesota Invite by over a second. In the process, she broke her own school record of 58.06 that was set at last year’s mid-season dual meet against TCU.

That makes her just the 19th woman in history to go faster than 58 seconds on a flat-start, and lifts her to 16th place in the all-time rankings in the event.

This is significant, as Olympic gold medalist Lydia Jacoby‘s faith in the Texas coaching staff looks like it could pay off.

Jacoby, who won the 100 breaststroke at the Tokyo Games last summer, committed to Texas in December 2020. At the time, it took “faith,” because Texas wasn’t a breaststroke powerhouse.

In the prior season, the Longhorns’ best time in the 100 breast was just a 1:01.10. Jacoby was already a full second better than that at the time of her commitment.

Now, the story is very different. Elendt is the fastest breaststroke in school history, and the Longhorns have a mass of breaststrokers coming in alongside Jacoby to form what will be arguably the country’s top collegiate breaststroke group next fall.

While Elendt’s classmate Ellie McLeod, a 1:01.5 high school breaststroker, hasn’t panned out for Texas, Jacoby will be joined next fall be freshmen Lindsey Hosch, the defending Texas 5A State Champion in the 100 breaststroke with a best of 1:01.5; and Chase Davison, the defending Colorado 4A State runner-up in the 100 breaststroke with a best of 1:02.3.

Combined with Elendt, who represented Germany in the semifinals of the 100 breaststroke at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, and the Texas weakness has become a Texas strength in a hurry.

Perhaps not a coincidence – but 2nd-year University of Texas assistant Mitch Dalton was primarily a breaststroker at James Madison University.

Jacoby’s short course best time of 58.87 would already rank her 4th-best in Texas school history.

Top 10 All-Time Texas Longhorns, Women’s 100 Breaststroke

  1. Anna Elendt, 2021 – 57.90
  2. Laura Sogar, 2012 – 58.32
  3. Gretchen Jacques, 2015 – 58.71
  4. Kennedy Lohman, 2018 – 59.25
  5. Madisyn Cox, 2015 – 59.62
  6. (TIE) Jordan Surhoff, 2015/Olivia Anderson, 2016 – 1:00.66
  7. Elizabeth Tinnon, 2007 – 1:00.32
  8. Alexandra Spann, 2010 – 1:00.59
  9. Holly Jansen, 2019 – 1:00.66

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Hswimmer
1 month ago

Will be interesting to see Jacobys yard progression. Even though she doesn’t train LC she performs much better in LC. Interesting for sure.

applesandoranges
Reply to  Hswimmer
1 month ago

Maybe one day colleges will transition to 25m and 50m so we can be in synch with the rest of the world. Do swimmers get tattoos indicating that they won an NCAA championship?

oxyswim
1 month ago

My hot take is that Elendt is faster than Jacoby next year. Think Lydia gets down to 58 low or 57 high. Her start and pullouts are so much more of a detriment in yards. It’s going to take a while for her to get stronger and improve those.

ArtVanDeLegh10
Reply to  oxyswim
1 month ago

I’d be surprised if Jacoby beat Elendt. SCY is much different than LCM.

SwimFan76
1 month ago

Aren’t there a lot of other programs with faster breaststroke groups than this? UVA, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama to name a few?

Chow
Reply to  SwimFan76
1 month ago

Uva takes the prize

Lucky 8s
Reply to  Chow
1 month ago

They take all the prizes!

Swimfan
Reply to  Chow
1 month ago

Nc state

Mr. Pack
Reply to  SwimFan76
1 month ago

Elendt and Jacoby will be a great 1-2 punch in the 100 next year but past that, their breaststroke group is meh. Definitely not the top in the country.

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder/co-owner of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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