2021 Big Ten Women’s Championships: Day 4 Finals Live Recap

2021 Big Ten Women’s Championships

  • When: Tuesday, February 23rd to Saturday, February 27th | Prelims 11am | Finals 6:30pm (5pm Tuesday) CT
  • Where: Minneapolis, MN (Central Time Zone) / Diving @ Purdue University
  • Defending Champion: Ohio State (1x) (results)
  • Live Results
  • Streaming: Big Ten Network
  • Championship Central

After day three prelims, Ohio State has extended their lead to 179 points over Michigan. The Buckeyes look to gain the most points in the 100 breast final tonight with 5 finalists including top seed sophomore Hannah Bach.

Michigan junior Olivia Carter is leading the 200 fly field tonight by about 2.5 seconds, looking to defend her 2020 championship title. 3 other Wolverines join her in the ‘A’ final and they are expected to garner major points for Michigan, chipping away at the Buckeye’s lead.

In the 200 free relay we may get to see the top 3 finishers of the 50 free final on Wednesday (Michigan’s Maggie MacNeil (21.44) and Daria Pyshnenko (21.88), and Northwestern’s Maddie Smith (21.94)) battle again in the ‘A’ final.

Notably, MacNeil was seeded 2nd in the 100 back going into this meet but she scratched the event in order to prepare for the 100 free tomorrow. Wisconsin’s Phoebe Bacon is still the top seed going into 100 back final tonight, but her closest challenger is OSU’s Emily Crane who finished less than half-a-second behind her.

The closest race in team standings right now is between Indiana (619) and Northwestern (599.5) for 3rd place going into the final day of the 2021 Big Ten Championships, tomorrow.

Day Four Finals Heat Sheet

100 Back – Finals

  • Big Ten meet record – 49.18, Beata Nelson (Wisconsin) – 2019
  • Big Ten record – 49.85, Beata Nelson (Wisconsin) – 2020
  • 2020 NCAA invite time – 52.73
  • Defending champion: Beata Nelson (Wisconsin), 49.85

Top 3

  1. Phoebe Bacon (Wisconsin) – 51.32
  2. Emily Crane (Ohio State) – 51.38
  3. Mara Newman (Wisconsin) – 52.89

Freshman Phoebe Bacon led a 1-3 finish for the Wisconsin Badgers, improving her prelims time by nearly a full second. She was still about .70 off her lifetime best from 2019, but her performance tonight was enough to secure the win. This is the 4th year in a row that Wisconsin has won this event, as Beata Nelson was the Big Ten 100 back champion for the past 3 years.

OSU freshman Emily Crane tore down Bacon’s half-a-second lead from prelims tonight, touching the wall a mere .06 after Bacon, and setting a new OSU school record. Newman, a junior, outswam her lifetime best from this morning by .01. Going into this meet, her all-time fastest 100 back time stood at 53.17 from the 2019 NC State Invitational.

There was one disqualification, from Northwestern’s Miriam Guevara, whose 53.10 from prelims would have placed her in 4th place. Tonight she touched the wall with a time of 1:02 and was reportedly disqualified for improper conduct or “failure to show an honest effort.” Guevara is set to compete in the 200 fly later tonight as the 2nd seed behind Michigan’s Olivia Carter.

100 Breast – Finals

  • Big Ten meet record – 55.88, Lilly King (Indiana) – 2019
  • Big Ten record – 55.88, Lilly King (Indiana) – 2019
  • 2020 NCAA invite time – 59.98
  • Defending champion: Miranda Tucker (Michigan), 58.15

Top 3

  1. Hannah Bach (Ohio State) – 58.29
  2. Sophie Angus (Northwestern) – 58.89
  3. Hannah Brunzell (Northwestern) – 59.23

Sophomore Hannah Bach improved upon her lifetime best from prelims by .11 and broke the OSU program record in order to defend 1st place from Northwestern senior Sophie Angus. Brunzell was the 2nd seed going into Friday’s final session, about one second behind Bach.

Angus shaved .03 from her lifetime best which she set one month ago at the Northwestern and Penn State dual meet. This was also a solid swim for Brunzell who snuck under the lifetime best 100 breast she swam at last year’s Big Ten Championships by .01.

All three were members of 2020 Big Ten Championship ‘A’ final with Angus placing 5th (58.96), Brunzell 6th (59.24), and Bach 8th (1:00.26). Indiana’s Emily Weiss, who placed 2nd after defending champion Miranda Tucker who has now graduated, touched the wall 5th tonight.

200 Fly – Finals

  • Big Ten meet record – 1:53.28, Olivia Carter (Michigan)
  • Big Ten record – 1:53.28, Olivia Carter (Michigan)
  • 2020 NCAA invite time – 1:56.06
  • Defending champion: Olivia Carter (Michigan), 1:53.28

Top 3

  1. Olivia Carter (Michigan) – 1:52.17
  2. Miriam Guevara (Northwestern) – 1:55.11
  3. Katherine Trace (Ohio State) – 1:56.13

Michigan’s Olivia Carter lowered her own Big Ten record by more than a second, touching the wall 1st with a new lifetime best of 1:52.17 and a 3 second lead over the field. She simultaneously broke her own Michigan program record and led a 1-4-5-8 finish for the Wolverines.

Guevara maintained Carter’s pace through the first 100 yards, as she touched the wall after the first 100 at 53.99 and Carter turned at 53.96. But it was the back-half that Carter really built her lead, finishing the race with a 100 split of 58.48 while no one else in the field brought it home under the one-minute mark. Guevara came within .7 of her lifetime best from last year’s Championships where she placed 3rd.

OSU’s Katherine Trace had an incredible finish compared to her 17th place finish at last year’s Championships where she posted a 1:58.65. Tonight she destroyed her previous lifetime best, 1:57.47, which she swam at the 2019 Big Ten Championships.

Platform Diving – Finals

  • Big Ten meet record (6 dives) – 424.45, Jessica Parratto (Indiana) – 2015
  • Big Ten record (5 dives) – 378.60, Jessica Parratto (Indiana) – 2019
  • Defending champion: Markie Hopkins (Northwestern), 285.45

Top 3

  1. Abigail Knapton (Nebraska) – 345.55
  2. Maggie Merriman (Purdue) – 307.60
  3. Ciara McGing (Ohio State) – 307.00

Nebraska’s Abigail Knapton claimed victory on platform tonight, following her 2nd place finish on 3-meter during Thursday’s finals session. Knapton, a redshirt senior, did not compete last year but she did place 4th in the event at the 2019 Big Ten Championships.

Purdue junior Maggie Merriman and OSU’s Ciara McGing were separated by less than 1 point tonight, with Merriman claiming 2nd place. This was way closer than Merriman’s battle with Maycey Vieta for 2nd place last year which Vieta ended up winning by less than 2 points. Freshman McGing was the youngest in the top 3 tonight, marking her Big Ten Championship debut with a 3rd place finish.

Defending champion Markie Hopkins from Northwestern finished in 6th place tonight with 313.65 points.

200 Free Relay – Finals

  • Big Ten meet record – 1:26.84, Michigan (2019)
  • Big Ten record – 1:26.25, Michigan (2019)
  • 2020 NCAA invite time – 1:28.43
  • Defending champion: Ohio State (1:27.57)

Top 3

  1. Ohio State – 1:27.53
  2. Michigan – 1:27.99
  3. Northwestern – 1:29.11

Ohio State’s relay splits seem to be the inverse of Michigan’s tonight. The Wolverines decided to lead off with the 2021 Big Ten 50 champion Maggie MacNeil (21.50) followed by 2nd place finisher Daria Pyshenko (21.76). MacNeil posted the fastest split in the field.

Ohio State relay built more momentum on the back-half, resulting in these splits: Taylor Petrak (22.04), Emily Crane (22.13), Katherine Zenick (21.79), and Amy Fulmer (21.57). The Buckeyes’ anchor leg was the closest challenger to MacNeil’s leadoff leg  and Fulmer was able to run down Michigan’s anchor, Olivia Carter, who posted a 22.23 after her 200 fly win one event earlier.

In 3rd place, Northwestern’s relay also possessed a top-3 50 free finisher from Wednesday’s 50 free final, Maddie Smith who posted a 21.66 on the second leg.

Team Scores (through 200 free relay)

  1. Ohio State – 1139.5
  2. Michigan – 940.5
  3. Indiana – 705
  4. Northwestern – 694.5
  5. Wisconsin – 511
  6. Minnesota – 427
  7. Nebraska – 382
  8. Iowa – 354.5
  9. Penn State – 309 / Purdue – 309
  10. Michigan State – 181
  11. Ilinois – 145
  12. Rutgers – 60

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Jackman
6 months ago

Guevera disqualified there after taking it blatantly easy. She went 1:02 there to save for the 200 fly.

Last edited 6 months ago by Jackman
Curious
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

Why was she DQd?

Joe
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

That’s a tough judgment call…idk maybe the rules are super clear cut about that but still

Jackman
Reply to  Joe
6 months ago

From NCAA Rulebook – ‘Coaches are to ensure student-athletes put forth an honest effort in all competitions. Failure to show an honest effort could be considered an act of improper conduct (Rule 2-5-6) and result in disqualification and/ or disciplinary action by the referee or meet committee.’

swammer
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

that just means it’s a personal decision made by the officials according to their opinion about her effort rather than what is factually known about the race…really bad call. especially with how close of a race for third it is between NU and Indiana.

“honest effort” really needs to be defined more clearly in the rule book to help avoid situations like these.

Last edited 6 months ago by swammer
Hooked them
Reply to  swammer
6 months ago

Heard from someone on deck that she was making a scene about not trying before and after your race.

If you’re going to punt on a race, don’t brag about it first. Just do it.

Swimswam
Reply to  swammer
6 months ago

She celebrated and slapped the water after coasting in at a 1:02… pretty unsportsmanlike if you ask me

Coach
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

They should have called this rule infraction on Florida football coach Dan Mullen for his lack of effort at their bowl game this year.

noWay
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

‘could be considered’ not is considered… I would fight it

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

This has been going on forever. Probably the most egregious was an NCAA 100 fly final back in the early 70’s when only 6 made the final. Tennessee’s two stars Tremblay and Edgar sandbagged it to save up for the 400 free relay, which Tennessee won. Caused quite the kerfuffle. May be when the rule was written.

Swimmer
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

Thats bs and northwestern should fight it

B1G Problem with that call
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

What an awful call. Didnt even hold the meet up

Guerra
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

I’m IU all the way AND I think that was wrong!

Swimmer
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

Why enter the double if you can’t even attempt to execute it in finals?!

ChapelleShow
Reply to  Jackman
6 months ago

On this week’s episode of “When Keeping it Real Goes Wrong”

1981swimcoach
6 months ago

Backstroke DQ call on Northwestern was a mistake by those refs. That girl earned her spot in finals and she deserves points for it.

Swimmer
Reply to  1981swimcoach
6 months ago

And with the team battle for 3rd being as close as it is right now, that dq has more impact than just that race. Very disappointing call by the officials.

1981swimcoach
Reply to  Swimmer
6 months ago

Very true. Would hate to see scores come down to this one miscall.

swimmom
Reply to  1981swimcoach
6 months ago

#justiceforguevara

Age Of Winters
Reply to  1981swimcoach
6 months ago

Agree. In the NFL they let teams run down the clock. You don’t get a flag for running the play clock down to one second and then hiking it.

JLB
Reply to  1981swimcoach
6 months ago

Regardless of how you feel about it, every coach on deck knows that rule…

Admin
Reply to  JLB
6 months ago

I actually had a HS teammate do this at the Texas State Championship meet, sandbagging the final of the 500 free because he had the 200 free relay right after. It worked, and we won the meet.

That was when only 16 were invited to the state meet and everyone made a final.

Swimmer8
6 months ago

How can one prove/disprove “honest effort”?

Caringkaren
Reply to  Swimmer8
6 months ago

You don’t.

swammer
Reply to  Swimmer8
6 months ago

You think adding 9 seconds from prelims to finals was an “honest effort”? You have to be joking.

Samuli Hirsi
Reply to  swammer
6 months ago

yeah, rules are rules, follow all of them or none. most of the officiating is judgment calls, just like this.

SkiSki
Reply to  swammer
6 months ago

why are you being downvoted you’re right.

Buddy
6 months ago

Boy oh boy osu on fire. Men’s diving 1-2-3 tonight at Purdue. I’m sure watching the women’s meet has helped their men back home

Last edited 6 months ago by Buddy
Swimmer2021
6 months ago

Bad call. Having two morning swims earlier in the day, how can officials measure level of effort/exhaustion?

swimmmer
6 months ago

Diving Results are wrong on here. Maggie Merriman was 2nd from Purdue. Ciara McGing 3rd. then Maycey and Emily from Purdue.

YFAN
6 months ago

GO BUCKS!!!

Coach Kippcakes
6 months ago

Guevara should not have been disqualified, she absolutely earned that swim in the morning with the 200 fly double. When, you are chasing Indiana, every point counts and her better event is the 200 fly with more point potential. If the score settles tomorrow and NU is within that range of Indiana, hands may be thrown.

Go cats
Reply to  Coach Kippcakes
6 months ago

Awww Coach Kipp! This might be the first time you’ve supported Northwestern. Thank you so much.