USA Swimming Announces 2020 Pro Swim Series Schedule

USA Swimming has announced the lineup for the 2020 Pro Swim Series, and the big news is the return of the November Pro Swim Series stop to the schedule.

From November 6th-9th, Greensboro, North Carolina will host a stop of the series. Until recently, there was traditionally a late-November stop, in short course yards, that would double as a mid-season collegiate invite for most teams (Minnesota was the typical host). Now, though, the meet comes before most colleges run their mid-season tapers, and it will be in long course.

This marks the 2nd year of open bidding for the series by USA Swimming. Previously, USA Swimming would pay hosts a $20,000 management fee; now, instead, they collect fees from host cities and venues.

The result in the 2019 season was a collection of non-traditional hosts. Through the first 3 meets, USA Swimming boasted over and 84% ticket sales rate in spite of complaints about the locations being harder to get to than previous host cities like Minneapolis, Austin, Atlanta, Charlotte, or Indianapolis. The last stop of the 2019 series, in Clovis, California, had much smaller crowds, however, and all stops have had much smaller fields of competitors, in general, than previous years.

This year will be a mix of traditional and new hosts. Greensboro, while not on the same scale as a city as some of those listed above, has become a traditional host on the USA Swimming circuit at their massive aquatics complex that now boasts 4 pools. Returning to host from the 2019 series are Knoxville, Tennessee; and Des Moines, Iowa. Joining the series for this year, in addition to Greensboro, are Mission Viejo’s Marguerite Aquatic Center – which recently reopened after an $11 million renovation – and Indianapolis and the IU Natatorium – the biggest permanent natatorium in the country by seating capacity.

Mission Viejo will be hosting outside in mid-April, where temperatures average highs around 71 degrees and lows around 50 degrees.

Full 2020 Pro Swim Series Schedule:

Dates City Pool
Nov. 6-9, 2019 Greensboro, N.C. Greensboro Aquatic Center
Jan. 16-19, 2020 Knoxville, Tenn. Allan Jones Intercollegiate Aquatic Center
Mar. 4-7, 2020 Des Moines, Iowa MidAmerican Energy Aquatic Center at the Wellmark YMCA
April 16-19, 2020 Mission Viejo, California Marguerite Aquatic Center
May 6-9, 2020 Indianapolis, Indiana IU Natatorium

The series will have the same 5 meets as 2019 did, and besides shifting the June event to a November event, will have roughly the same schedule as well.

Approximately 1,100 total swimmers competed in at least 1 stop of the 2019 series, where $540,000 were awarded in total prize money.

The series will be a lead-up to the 2020 Olympic Trials, which begin on June 21st in Omaha, Nebraska.

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Nswim
2 years ago

Makes sense to move the June meet to November, especially given trials are right around that time. However, do you think this is a move to attract athletes already attending the ISL meet in Maryland not too long after that?

Superfan
Reply to  Braden Keith
2 years ago

How there is some training interspersed in there sometime?!?

Swammer
2 years ago

Better!

Tupperware
2 years ago

Greensboro is an awesome pool with the capability of hosting a large number of swimmers – good choice

Tm71
2 years ago

Mission Viego great! Will try to go for the Saturday session

notacoach
2 years ago

TYR lead sponsor still for 2020? or TBA?

WV Swammer
2 years ago

Nov. 6-9….nice

Leisurely1:29
Reply to  WV Swammer
2 years ago

And May 6-9

OfficialDad
2 years ago

Are all five stops long course format? Or just Greensboro?

Woke Stasi
2 years ago

: good solid reporting with useful information. I have question for you about how monies are paid out and divided up for Nationals. For example, the 2019 Long Course Outdoor Nationals will be held at Stanford in a little more than five weeks from now. What kinds of revenues can such a meet expect to generate (tickets, TV rights, concessions, etc.)? What groups have access to that money? How much, if any, money does US Swimming give to the host groups? How much does US Swimming take? Who is responsible for paying the people putting on the meet? If the host group loses money, what happens? Any info you or anyone else can provide would be appreciated.

Woke Stasi
Reply to  Braden Keith
2 years ago

Thanks. I look forward to your in-depth piece on the USA Swimming budgetary process.

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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