Louise Hansson Explains How Racing in the USA Puts Her at Her Best (Video)

2019 WOMEN’S DIVISION I NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS

Reported by Lauren Neidigh.

WOMEN’S 100 FLY:

  • NCAA Record: Louise Hansson (USC), 2019- 49.34
  • American Record: Kelsi (Worrell) Dahlia (Louisville), 2016- 49.43
  • Meet Record: Kelsi (Worrell) Dahlia (Louisville), 2016- 49.43

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL RESULTS:

  1. GOLD: Louise Hansson, USC, 49.26
  2. SILVER: Maggie MacNeil, Michigan, 49.66
  3. BRONZE: Katie McLaughlin, Cal, 49.97
  4. Erika Brown, Tennessee, 50.38
  5. Aly Tetzloff, Auburn, 50.61
  6. Izzy Ivey, Cal, 50.82
  7. Morgan Hill, Virginia, 50.84
  8. Grace Oglesby, Louisville, 51.10

USC’s Louise Hansson was right on her own record pace at the 50 in 23.03. She held on to her lead, posting the fastest time in history to repeat as champion with a new NCAA Record of 49.26. Behind her, Michigan freshman Maggie MacNeil was within about 2 tenths of the American Record with a 49.66, which is just hundredths shy of her best from Big Tens. MacNeil’s swim was the 4th fastest performance in history.

Cal’s Katie McLaughlin broke 50 for the first time, making her the 5th swimmer ever to break that barrier with a 49.97. That breaks Natalie Coughlin’s former Cal school record of 50.01. Tennessee’s Erika Brown, the 4th fastest performer ever, was 4th here in 50.38.

SEC runner-up Aly Tetzloff of Auburn clipped a few tenths off her best time for a top 5 finish, clocking in at 50.61. Cal freshman Izzy Ivey hit the wall in 50.82 for her first sub-51 swim. Virginia’s Morgan Hillalso broke 51 for the first time, just 2 hundredths behind Ivey for 7th in 50.84. Both Tetzloff and Ivey will compete in the 100 back later tonight.

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1 year ago

It was a smooth 100 fly performance by Hansson. It is highly likely she will break the 200 fly record in the finals this evening…

About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

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