Four Years Later: The Swimming Landscape from London to Rio, Part Two

Note: This is part two of a two part series, “Four Years Later”. Part One covered the men. 

The greatest virtue of the four-year Olympic cycle is how it works the sport of swimming down to a concentrated size. Every Olympics is a snapshot of what each little mini-era of swimming was all about. With Rio fast approaching, we wanted to take a look back at 2012. What did the future look like after London as it compares to what actually happened.In the second part of “Four Years Later”, we’re going to take a look at which women were on top of the world in January 2012, and who is in a similar position now. What swimmers looked like they were destined for victory in London but came up short. Who “came out of nowhere” and stepped up to the big London moment? Who met expectations?

For reference, I’m going to compare the 2011 World Championship top three to the 2012 Olympic results. I’ll also talk about the 2015 Kazan results and what they suggest or don’t suggest will happen in Rio:

50 m freestyle[24]

 Therese Alshammar
Sweden (SWE)
24.14  Ranomi Kromowidjojo
Netherlands (NED)
24.27  Marleen Veldhuis
Netherlands (NED)
24.49
100 m freestyle[25]

 Aleksandra Gerasimenya
Belarus (BLR)
 Jeanette Ottesen
Denmark (DEN)
53.45   Not awarded  Ranomi Kromowidjojo
Netherlands (NED)
53.66
200 m freestyle[26]

 Federica Pellegrini
Italy (ITA)
1:55.58  Kylie Palmer
Australia (AUS)
1:56.04  Camille Muffat
France (FRA)
1:56.10
400 m freestyle[27]

 Federica Pellegrini
Italy (ITA)
4:01.97  Rebecca Adlington
Great Britain (GBR)
4:04.01  Camille Muffat
France (FRA)
4:04.06
800 m freestyle[28]

 Rebecca Adlington
Great Britain (GBR)
8:17.51  Lotte Friis
Denmark (DEN)
8:18.20  Kate Ziegler
United States (USA)
8:23.36
1500 m freestyle[29]

 Lotte Friis
Denmark (DEN)
15:49.59  Kate Ziegler
United States (USA)
15:55.60  Li Xuanxu
China (CHN)
15:58.02
50 m backstroke[30]

 Anastasia Zueva
Russia (RUS)
27.79  Aya Terakawa
Japan (JPN)
27.93  Missy Franklin
United States (USA)
28.01
100 m backstroke[31]

 Zhao Jing
China (CHN)
59.05  Anastasia Zueva
Russia (RUS)
59.06  Natalie Coughlin
United States (USA)
59.15
200 m backstroke[32]

 Missy Franklin
United States (USA)
2:05.10
AM
 Belinda Hocking
Australia (AUS)
2:06.06  Sharon van Rouwendaal
Netherlands (NED)
2:07.78
50 m breaststroke[33]

 Jessica Hardy
United States (USA)
30.19  Yuliya Efimova
Russia (RUS)
30.49  Rebecca Soni
United States (USA)
30.58
100 m breaststroke[34]

 Rebecca Soni
United States (USA)
1:05.05  Leisel Jones
Australia (AUS)
1:06.25  Ji Liping
China (CHN)
1:06.52
200 m breaststroke[35]

 Rebecca Soni
United States (USA)
2:21.47  Yuliya Efimova
Russia (RUS)
2:22.22  Martha McCabe
Canada (CAN)
2:24.81
50 m butterfly[36]

 Inge Dekker
Netherlands (NED)
25.71  Therese Alshammar
Sweden (SWE)
25.76  Mélanie Henique
France (FRA)
25.86
100 m butterfly[37]

 Dana Vollmer
United States (USA)
56.87  Alicia Coutts
Australia (AUS)
56.94  Lu Ying
China (CHN)
57.06
200 m butterfly[38]

 Jiao Liuyang
China (CHN)
2:05.55  Ellen Gandy
Great Britain (GBR)
2:05.59  Liu Zige
China (CHN)
2:05.90
200 m individual medley[39]

 Ye Shiwen
China (CHN)
2:08.90  Alicia Coutts
Australia (AUS)
2:09.00  Ariana Kukors
United States (USA)
2:09.12
400 m individual medley[40]

 Elizabeth Beisel
United States (USA)
4:31.78  Hannah Miley
Great Britain (GBR)
4:34.22  Stephanie Rice
Australia (AUS)
4:34.23
4×100 m freestyle relay[41]

 Netherlands
Inge Dekker (54.91)
Ranomi Kromowidjojo (53.26)
Marleen Veldhuis (53.33)
Femke Heemskerk (52.46)
3:33.96  United States
Natalie Coughlin (54.09)
Missy Franklin (52.99)
Jessica Hardy (54.12)
Dana Vollmer (53.27)
3:34.47  Germany
Britta Steffen (54.51)
Silke Lippok (54.17)
Lisa Vitting (53.85)
Daniela Schreiber (53.12)
3:36.05
4×200 m freestyle relay[42]

 United States
Missy Franklin (1:55.06)
Dagny Knutson (1:57.18)
Katie Hoff (1:57.41)
Allison Schmitt (1:56.49)
7:46.14  Australia
Bronte Barratt (1:56.86)
Blair Evans (1:57.69)
Angie Bainbridge (1:57.36)
Kylie Palmer (1:55.51)
7:47.42  China
Chen Qian (1:57.37)
Pang Jiaying (1:56.97)
Liu Jing (1:57.85)
Tang Yi (1:55.47)
7:47.66
4×100 m medley relay[43]

 United States
Natalie Coughlin (59.12)
Rebecca Soni (1:04.71)
Dana Vollmer (55.74)
Missy Franklin (52.79)
3:52.36
AM
 China
Zhao Jing (59.24)
Ji Liping (1:06.27)
Lu Ying (56.77)
Tang Yi (53.33)
3:55.61  Australia
Belinda Hocking (59.91)
Leisel Jones (1:06.18)
Alicia Coutts (56.69)
Merindah Dingjan (54.35)
3:57.13

Then what followed in London:

50 m freestyle
details
 Ranomi Kromowidjojo
Netherlands (NED)
24.05 OR  Aliaksandra Herasimenia
Belarus (BLR)
24.28 NR  Marleen Veldhuis
Netherlands (NED)
24.39
100 m freestyle
details
 Ranomi Kromowidjojo
Netherlands (NED)
53.00 OR  Aliaksandra Herasimenia
Belarus (BLR)
53.38  Tang Yi
China (CHN)
53.44
200 m freestyle
details
 Allison Schmitt
United States (USA)
1:53.61 OR, AM  Camille Muffat
France (FRA)
1:55.58  Bronte Barratt
Australia (AUS)
1:55.81
400 m freestyle
details
 Camille Muffat
France (FRA)
4:01.45 OR  Allison Schmitt
United States (USA)
4:01.77 AM  Rebecca Adlington
Great Britain (GBR)
4:03.01
800 m freestyle
details
 Katie Ledecky
United States (USA)
8:14.63 AM  Mireia Belmonte García
Spain (ESP)
8:18.76 NR  Rebecca Adlington
Great Britain (GBR)
8:20.32
100 m backstroke
details
 Missy Franklin
United States (USA)
58.33 AM  Emily Seebohm
Australia (AUS)
58.68  Aya Terakawa
Japan (JPN)
58.83 AS
200 m backstroke
details
 Missy Franklin
United States (USA)
2:04.06 WR  Anastasia Zuyeva
Russia (RUS)
2:05.92  Elizabeth Beisel
United States (USA)
2:06.55
100 m breaststroke
details
 Rūta Meilutytė
Lithuania (LTU)
1:05.47  Rebecca Soni
United States (USA)
1:05.55  Satomi Suzuki
Japan (JPN)
1:06.46
200 m breaststroke
details
 Rebecca Soni
United States (USA)
2:19.59 WR  Satomi Suzuki
Japan (JPN)
2:20.72 =AS  Yuliya Yefimova
Russia (RUS)
2:20.92 EU
100 m butterfly
details
 Dana Vollmer
United States (USA)
55.98 WR  Lu Ying
China (CHN)
56.87  Alicia Coutts
Australia (AUS)
56.94
200 m butterfly
details
 Jiao Liuyang
China (CHN)
2:04.06 OR  Mireia Belmonte García
Spain (ESP)
2:05.25 NR  Natsumi Hoshi
Japan (JPN)
2:05.48
200 m individual medley
details
 Ye Shiwen
China (CHN)
2:07.57 OR, AS  Alicia Coutts
Australia (AUS)
2:08.15  Caitlin Leverenz
United States (USA)
2:08.95
400 m individual medley
details
 Ye Shiwen
China (CHN)
4:28.43 WR  Elizabeth Beisel
United States (USA)
4:31.27  Li Xuanxu
China (CHN)
4:32.91
4×100 m freestyle relay
details
 Australia (AUS)
Alicia Coutts (53.90)
Cate Campbell (53.19)
Brittany Elmslie (53.41)
Melanie Schlanger (52.65)
Emily Seebohm[b]
Yolane Kukla[b]
Libby Trickett[b]
3:33.15 OR  Netherlands (NED)
Inge Dekker (54.67)
Marleen Veldhuis (53.80)
Femke Heemskerk (53.39)
Ranomi Kromowidjojo (51.93)
Hinkelien Schreuder[b]
3:33.79  United States (USA)
Missy Franklin (53.52)
Jessica Hardy (53.53)
Lia Neal (53.65)
Allison Schmitt (53.54)
Amanda Weir[b]
Natalie Coughlin[b]
3:34.24 AM
4×200 m freestyle relay
details
 United States (USA)
Missy Franklin (1:55.96)
Dana Vollmer (1:56.02)
Shannon Vreeland (1:56.85)
Allison Schmitt (1:54.09)
Lauren Perdue[b]
Alyssa Anderson[b]
7:42.92 OR, AM  Australia (AUS)
Bronte Barratt (1:55.76)
Melanie Schlanger (1:55.62)
Kylie Palmer (1:56.91)
Alicia Coutts (1:56.12)
Brittany Elmslie[b]
Angie Bainbridge[b]
Jade Neilsen[b]
Blair Evans[b]
7:44.41  France (FRA)
Camille Muffat (1:55.51)
Charlotte Bonnet (1:57.78)
Ophélie-Cyrielle Étienne (1:58.05)
Coralie Balmy (1:56.15)
Margaux Farrell[b]
Mylène Lazare[b]
7:47.49 NR
4×100 m medley relay
details
 United States (USA)
Missy Franklin (58.50)
Rebecca Soni (1:04.82)
Dana Vollmer (55.48)
Allison Schmitt (53.25)
Rachel Bootsma[b]
Breeja Larson[b]
Claire Donahue[b]
Jessica Hardy[b]
3:52.05 WR  Australia (AUS)
Emily Seebohm (59.01)
Leisel Jones (1:06.06)
Alicia Coutts (56.41)
Melanie Schlanger (52.54)
Brittany Elmslie[b]
3:54.02  Japan (JPN)
Aya Terakawa (58.99)
Satomi Suzuki (1:05.96)
Yuka Kato (57.36)
Haruka Ueda (53.42)

Finally, the results of Kazan:

50 m freestyle[23]

 Bronte Campbell
Australia (AUS)
24.12  Ranomi Kromowidjojo
Netherlands (NED)
24.22  Sarah Sjöström
Sweden (SWE)
24.31
100 m freestyle[24]

 Bronte Campbell
Australia (AUS)
52.52  Sarah Sjöström
Sweden (SWE)
52.70  Cate Campbell
Australia (AUS)
52.82
200 m freestyle[25]

 Katie Ledecky
United States (USA)
1:55.16  Federica Pellegrini
Italy (ITA)
1:55.32  Missy Franklin
United States (USA)
1:55.49
400 m freestyle[26]

 Katie Ledecky
United States (USA)
3:59.13
CR
 Sharon van Rouwendaal
Netherlands (NED)
4:03.02
NR
 Jessica Ashwood
Australia (AUS)
4:03.34
OC
800 m freestyle[27]

 Katie Ledecky
United States (USA)
8:07.39
WR
 Lauren Boyle
New Zealand (NZL)
8:17.65
OC
 Jazmin Carlin
Great Britain (GBR)
8:18.15
1500 m freestyle[28]

 Katie Ledecky
United States (USA)
15:25.48
WR
 Lauren Boyle
New Zealand (NZL)
15:40.14
OC
 Boglárka Kapás
Hungary (HUN)
15:47.09
NR
50 m backstroke[29]

 Fu Yuanhui
China (CHN)
27.11  Etiene Medeiros
Brazil (BRA)
27.26
AM
 Liu Xiang
China (CHN)
27.58
100 m backstroke[30]

 Emily Seebohm
Australia (AUS)
58.26  Madison Wilson
Australia (AUS)
58.75  Mie Nielsen
Denmark (DEN)
58.86
200 m backstroke[31]

 Emily Seebohm
Australia (AUS)
2:05.81
OC
 Missy Franklin
United States (USA)
2:06.34  Katinka Hosszú
Hungary (HUN)
2:06.84
50 m breaststroke[32]

 Jennie Johansson
Sweden (SWE)
30.05  Alia Atkinson
Jamaica (JAM)
30.11  Yuliya Yefimova
Russia (RUS)
30.13
100 m breaststroke[33]

 Yuliya Yefimova
Russia (RUS)
1:05.66  Rūta Meilutytė
Lithuania (LTU)
1:06.36  Alia Atkinson
Jamaica (JAM)
1:06.42
200 m breaststroke[34]

 Kanako Watanabe
Japan (JPN)
2:21.15  Micah Lawrence
United States (USA)
2:22.44  Jessica Vall
Spain (ESP)
 Rikke Møller Pedersen
Denmark (DEN)
 Shi Jinglin
China (CHN)
2:22:76
50 m butterfly[35]

 Sarah Sjöström
Sweden (SWE)
24.96
CR
 Jeanette Ottesen
Denmark (DEN)
25.34  Lu Ying
China (CHN)
25.37
AS
100 m butterfly[36]

 Sarah Sjöström
Sweden (SWE)
55.64
WR
 Jeanette Ottesen
Denmark (DEN)
57.05  Lu Ying
China (CHN)
57.48
200 m butterfly[37]

 Natsumi Hoshi
Japan (JPN)
2:05.56  Cammile Adams
United States (USA)
2:06.40  Zhang Yufei
China (CHN)
2:06.51
WJR
200 m individual medley[38]

 Katinka Hosszú
Hungary (HUN)
2:06.12
WR
 Kanako Watanabe
Japan (JPN)
2:08.45  Siobhan-Marie O’Connor
Great Britain (GBR)
2:08.77
400 m individual medley[39]

 Katinka Hosszú
Hungary (HUN)
4:30.39  Maya DiRado
United States (USA)
4:31.71  Emily Overholt
Canada (CAN)
4:32.52
NR
4×100 m freestyle relay[40]

 Australia
Emily Seebohm (53.92)
Emma McKeon (53.57)
Bronte Campbell (51.77)
Cate Campbell (52.22)
3:31.48
CR
 Netherlands
Ranomi Kromowidjojo (53.30)
Maud van der Meer (54.50)
Marrit Steenbergen (53.88)
Femke Heemskerk (51.99)
3:33.67  United States
Missy Franklin (53.68)
Margo Geer (54.14)
Lia Neal (53.70)
Simone Manuel (53.09)
3:34.61
4×200 m freestyle relay[41]

 United States
Missy Franklin (1:55.95)
Leah Smith (1:56.86)
Katie McLaughlin (1:56.92)
Katie Ledecky (1:55.64)
7:45.37  Italy
Alice Mizzau (1:57.50)
Erica Musso (1:58.66)
Chiara Masini Luccetti (1:57.52)
Federica Pellegrini (1:54.73)
7:48.41  China
Qiu Yuhan (1:56.88)
Guo Junjun (1:57.55)
Zhang Yufei (1:58.73)
Shen Duo (1:55.94)
7:49.10
4×100 m medley relay[42]

 China
Fu Yuanhui (59.29)
Shi Jinglin (1:05.56)
Lu Ying (56.56)
Shen Duo (53.00)
3:54.41  Sweden
Michelle Coleman (1:00.74)
Jennie Johansson (1:05.63)
Sarah Sjöström (55.28)
Louise Hansson (53.59)
3:55.24
EU
 Australia
Emily Seebohm (58.81)
Taylor McKeown (1:07.38)
Emma McKeon (57.59)
Bronte Campbell (51.78)
3:55.56

Four Years Ago:

Lotte Friis and Rebecca Adlington seemed poised to battle each other for distance supremacy. Adlington was the 2008 champion and could rely on either a home crowd boost or be hurt by the extra pressure. Friis had been consistently fast, both swimmers looked like they could challenge the world record and would probably have to do so to win.

Of course, no one was counting on the heat seaking missile that was Katie Ledecky. In January 2012, Ledecky’s personal best was more than twenty seconds slower than the two favorites. Ledecky completely demoralized Adlington and Friis in the final. Friis knew she had to be out front and swam a punishing first half trying to get in front. When she couldn’t, she flailed badly and missed out on a medal. A shaken Adlington managed a bronze.

In women’s swimming, there have always been stars that burst onto the scene at the last moment heading into an Olympics. In 2012, Ledecky was not the only one. Ruta Meilutyte had a similar path. These wild cards can be really disruptive to the status quo.

Four Years Later:

Just because something has only gone one way in the past, doesn’t mean it will continue. Rio seems to be ripe for change in this regard. Looking across the events, they are populated by more competitive, experienced swimmers than ever. The best candidate for a mid-teen medal is probably Viktoria Gunes, who will hardly be coming out of nowhere given her near world record last summer.

One of the things that Kazan reveals in comparison to Shanghai is how much faster women’s swimming has gotten over just one Olympic cycle. As women’s swimming develops, it will become less and less likely that we have 15 year old girls winning gold medals, just as the notion of teenage boys winning gold is nearly extinct.

Four Years Ago:

If you weren’t improving coming off Shanghai, you had no chance to win in London. This was not always the case. 2007 to 2008 was an aberration in this regard, given the change in suit technology. But several stars from the 2003 World Championships swam slower in Athens and still won gold.

Just one event in London had a slower winning time than in Shanghai. In many cases, the events took huge leaps in performance. Dana Vollmer went from winning a world title at 56.8 in the 100 fly to taking Olympic gold in 55.9. Missy Franklin leapfrogged the growingly deep 100 backstroke field to improve that events winning time by a similar margin. Rebecca Soni swam a world record ahead of an Asian record and a European record in the 200 breaststroke.

Four Years Later:

We could see a similar leap in 2016. Perhaps it will be somewhat less given the dramatic improvements made over the last four years, but expect a big improvement over Kazan in Rio. Many of the top stars are swimming well already and are surely saving even better performances for the summer.

Katie Ledecky could be a one woman wrecking crew, given that she’s already broken her own world record in early 2016. But also expect the depth in women’s sprinting to bring out some incredible performances as well as backstroke.

Four Years Ago:

The Netherlands looked unstoppable in the 4×100 relay. With the top two Shanghai finishers in the 100 free swimming for countries with little chance of a relay medal, Femke Heemskerk and Ranomi Kromowidjojo were the best 1-2 punch in the world. As good as Kromowidjojo was, she swam an unbelievable anchor split in London (51.93). But the Netherlands finished 2nd.

Australia, just sixth at the previous world’s, won handily. They only carried one swimmer from the Shanghai final into the London final, Alicia Coutts. They got nearly the best performance possible out of each swimmer in their relay.

Four Years Later:

The script has been flipped and now Australia are even bigger favorites than the Netherlands were in 2012. Nothing they have done as of this January has given any indication they won’t be spot on in Rio.

The Netherlands, however, could definitely take their revenge. Kromowidjojo and Heemskerk are still putting up great swims. Marrit Steenbergen is extremely young and could be the crucial third piece. Their fourth is not as strong as the larger countries, but Maud van der Meer has looked good, and don’t sleep on 18 year old Robin Neumann, who improved from 57.10 to 55.2 over the last nine months. If Neumann or van der Meer can produce a 54.0, it could be enough to ensure a Netherlands victory.

Next up, Part Three: Taking a look at the improvements over the last few years and making some predictions as to the winning times in Rio. 

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26 Comments on "Four Years Later: The Swimming Landscape from London to Rio, Part Two"

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Have to disagree with the 4×100 comment. Even if NED find a 54.0 leg, the sub 52 power of Cate/Bronte and sub 53 from McKeon etc will make them heavy heavy favourites for the final.

Agreed, ths main dispute on this relay will be the bronze.. US is there, but Sweden may find a 54 leg and Canada is close too..

If Ruck and Oleksiak can make another jump in times, Canada are a huge threat for the medals.

What odds could you get on USA missing out on the medals on both 4×100 free relays? That’d be a shocker in swimming tradition terms.

If we apply the Shanghai-London trends to the Kazan-Rio cycle, 5 events would have repeat winners. In which events do you think the Kazan winner will also win in Rio? My guesses are:

– 200 Free (Ledecky)
– 400 Free (Ledecky)
– 800 Free (Ledecky)
– 100 Back (Seebohm)
– 100 Fly (Sjostrom)

I’m going to make a bold prediction here.. I think Dirado will upset Hosszu in the IMs in Rio!

IM, or IMs? Dirado would be a huge shocker in the 200, to be honest… Hosszu is almost 3s faster, Watanabe’s back half is impossible to compete with, all she’ll see of O’Connor at the 50 is her feet. The 400, I actually agree, I doubt Hosszu gets the trip relative to her 200 in a LCM pool, but the 200 isn’t going to happen. I can’t even see a medal for Dirado. Even if she can reel O’Connor in on the backstroke leg (Hosszu will be gone), she then has to stick with her on breast (her recent 67.7 showed how good her breaststroke is looking) and hold off Watanabe, the worlds best 200m breaststroker…

i’d say gunes is the best female breaststroker right now. 2.19 compared to watanabes 2.21 last summer and if i remember correctly her 200 im breast split was actually faster than watanabes split as well. 35.5 or so o.O

commonwombat

The issue with Gunes is NOT her capacity to produce the fast time but rather her ability to back up through the three rounds. In Kazan, she was 5th fastest in heats but failed to replicate in semis and missed the final. At World Juniors, she had the comfort factor of (1) only having heats to finals in the 200 and (2) being so far ahead of the competition that qualification was “a walk in the park”. She’s most certainly a very major contender but this IS a key issue she has to overcome in both events.

Let’s not sleep on Efimova

Gutsy call, I like it.

Surprisingly, the Iron Lady has been stronger in the 200 IM than the 400 IM in recent years. Hard to see anyone else going 2:06 in the 200 IM, but if DiRado can get down to 4:30, she could pull off an upset.

I’m not sure Hosszu is necessarily stronger at the 200IM than the 400IM. Consider the schedule she had to swim and the performances she put in after her 200IM… A 4:30 is quite strong at the end of the week, though we’ll see how she fares with it at the front of the schedule in Rio.

commonwombat

I’d give DiRado a very real shot at the 400IM but the 200 ……. just not seeing it. She’s conceding the best part of 3sec to Hosszu. She’ll be doing well to pick up a medal in this event

I think the 4×100 is far more open than the statistics suggest. The Dutch have a real bulk of girls capable of 54 legs (Vermeulen, Dekker, Neumann, vd Meer). One of them chucking in a 53. leg stuck in the middle really wouldn’t be surprising, in vd Meer’s case it should really be expected after a 54.4 PB in December.

Kromowidjojo, Heemskerk & young Steenbergen are a very strong foundation. It’ll rely on a lazy swim from one of the Aussies, but 2012 taught us that might just happen.

commonwombat
Hhmm, one slight issue is that they are likely to have to expend Kromowidjojo “off the gun” to ensure a highly competitive start. Whilst she is still highly capable of a sub53 flying start, she hasn’t been in that country flat start since 2012. Steenbergen is most certainly a great prospect but, as yet, she’s only a 53high flat start so whilst she’s not likely to be conceding water to those behind, she’s probably not likely to be dropping in a sub53 just yet. Heemkerk IS a superb relay performer and should bring them home stronger than anyone else bar either Campbell but they realistically need that 4th swimmer sub54 to be in the gold mix. The internal culture of… Read more »

Australia has some deep in their relay.We will probably see a better Emma and a healthy Britanny Elmslie swimming great legs.Save a disaster they will go probably a lot faster than at Worlds.Don’t expect only a 53.9 opening in Rio by Australia.

commonwombat
Elmslie was in the London team that won gold but she wasn’t in the finals line-up in Glasgow that set the WR; so whilst it would be great for depth/options to have her back swimming fast she’s not necessarily part of the optimal line-up. At this point this would look to be C1, C2, McKeonE, question mark. I would expect Wright, Elsmlie, Seebohm, Wilson & Coutts as being those most likely to be in the mix for that spot. It would not surprise to see an AUS heats line-up set a time that would medal in the main final. USA has sufficient depth of sub54s that they can field alternates in heats; this luxury however is not one that NED… Read more »
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About Chris DeSantis

Chris DeSantis

Chris DeSantis is a swim coach, writer and swimming enthusiast. Chris does private consulting and coaching with teams and individuals. You can find him at www.facebook.com/cdswimcoach. Chris is a 2009 Graduate from the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology program at the University of Pennsylvania. He was the first professional athletic coach …

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