Tokyo Paralympics Day Seven Records: Three World, Eight Paralympic Records Down

2020 TOKYO SUMMER PARALYMPIC GAMES

EXPLANATION OF PARA CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM

  • There are 14 classifications for Paralympic swimmers, typically denoted as “S” followed by a number.
  • “SB” designates an athletes classification for breaststroke events
  • “SM” is for individual medley events
  • Athletes with physical impairments are classified in S1-S10, SB1-SB9, and SM1-SM10 with numbers 1-10 ranging from more severe activity limitations to less severe limitations.
  • Athletes with visual impairments are classified in S/SB11-13.
  • Athletes with intellectual impairments are classified in S/SB14.
  • The Paralympics are not the “Para Olympics” or anything similar. The International Olympic Committee and International Paralympic Committee are separate organizations with separate leadership and separate events that happen to have a partnership to organize their crowned jewels more efficiently.

Day 7 Prelims Recap

Day 7 Finals Recap

During the seventh finals session, three World and six Paralympic records fell while two Paralympic records fell during prelims, totaling eight new Paralympic records.

Brit Reece Dunn took his fourth medal in Tokyo by winning the SM14 men’s 200 IM final, where he shaved 0.14s off the 2019 World record with a time of 2:08.02. His time also eclipsed the 2016 Paralympic record of 2:10.29. Also swimming under the former Paralympic record was Brazil’s Gabriel Bandeira (2:09.56), who established new Americas/South American continental records.

A number of records fell in the S7 women’s 100 free final. Taking down the 2012 Paralympic record of 1:09.39 was Italy’s Giulia Terzi, whose time of 1:09.21 also set the European continental record. Two S6 swimmers tied for bronze at 1:11.07, both breaking the 2016 class World and Paralympic records, courtesy of Ukraine’s Yelyzaveta Mereshko and China’s Jiang Yuyan. Mereshko formerly held the World and Paralympic marks at 1:11.40.

Ukraine’s Maksym Krypak broke the 2016 World and Paralympic records of 54.71 in the S10 men’s 100 fly, touching the wall 0.56s faster at 54.15. Australia’s Col Pearse set a new Oceanian record for the bronze medal at at 57.66.

In the 49 points mixed 4×100 free relay, the Russian Paralympic Committee (RPC) quartet of Ilnur Garipov, Anna KrivshinaDaria Pikalova, and Vladimir Sotnikov established a brand-new Paralympic record at 3:53.79. Meanwhile, Japan finished in seventh at 4:08.66, setting a new Asian continental record.

Setting a new SB2 Paralympic record out of the SB3 women’s 50 breast heats was Great Britain’s Ellie Challis, placing 10th with a time of 1:10.37. Challis took down the 2016 record of 1:13.95 by 3.58s.

In the SB2 men’s 50 breast event, SB1 swimmer Aliaksei Talai of Belarus broke his class Paralympic record twice in the same day. He qualified 6th into the final during prelims at 1:24.86, which took down the 1992 Paralympic record of 1:48.31. Then, Talai placed seventh in the SB2 final with a time of 1:23.16.

More Day 7 Continental Records

  • Swimming the No. 3 seed into the S10 men’s 100 fly heats was Aussie Col Pearse, clocking in a time of 58.23 for a new Oceania continental record.
  • In the S8 men’s 400 free final, USA’s Matthew Torres picked up the bronze medal at 4:28.47, setting a new Americas continental record.
  • Placing fifth in the S12 men’s 100 free final for a new Oceanian continental record of 53.78 was Australia’s Braedan Jason.
  • Taking silver in the S7 men’s 50 free final was Colombia’s Carlos Serrano Zarate, equaling the Americas continental record and setting a new South American record of 27.84.
  • Spain’s Sarai Gascon placed second in the S9 women’s 100 free final with a time of 1:02.77, writing a new European record.

DAY 7 MEDAL TABLE

RANK TEAM/NPC GOLD SILVER BRONZE TOTAL RANK BY TOTAL
1 China 13 12 14 39 1
2 RPC 12 8 13 33 2
3 Ukraine 10 14 7 31 3
4 Italy 10 11 6 27 4
5 USA 10 6 9 25 5
6 Great Britain 7 7 7 21 7
7 Australia 5 8 11 24 6
8 Brazil 5 4 8 17 8
9 Belarus 5 1 0 6 12
10 Israel 4 1 1 6 12
11 Netherlands 3 4 3 10 10
12 Spain 2 9 0 11 9
13 Japan 2 3 3 8 11
14 New Zealand 2 1 1 4 17
15 Mexico 2 0 4 6 12
16 Azerbaijan 2 0 0 2 19
17 Colombia 1 3 2 6 12
18 Canada 1 2 2 5 16
19 Chile 1 1 0 2 19
19 Hungary 1 1 0 2 19
19 Ireland 1 1 0 2 19
22 Singapore 1 0 0 1 26
23 France 0 2 1 3 18
24 Argentina 0 1 0 1 26
25 Germany 0 0 2 2 19
25 Greece 0 0 2 2 19
25 Uzbekistan 0 0 2 2 19
28 Cyprus 0 0 1 1 26
28 Lithuania 0 0 1 1 26
28 Turkey 0 0 1 1 26

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About Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro started swimming at age 11, instantly becoming drawn to the sport. He was a breaststroker and IMer when competing. After joining SwimSwam, the site has become an outlet for him to research and learn about competitive swimming and experience the sport through a new lenses. He graduated in …

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