Thomas Neill Wins Fourth Australian Age Title; 2:03 in IM at 16

2019 AUSTRALIAN AGE CHAMPIONSHIPS

  • Mon. April 15 – Mon. April 22, 2019 (Sunday/Monday Multiclass Timed Finals)
  • Mon.-Sat. Heats 9 AM / Finals 6 PM (Local Time)
  • Multiclass Timed Finals 4 PM Sat., 10 AM/4 PM Sun.-Mon.
  • SA Aquatic & Leisure Center, Oaklands Park South Australia
  • LCM (50-meter course)
  • Meet site
  • Live results

Australian 16-year-old Thomas Neill continues to be a standout of the 2019 Australian Age Championships, winning his fourth event title on Friday with a 2:03.53 in the 200 IM.

The time comes within a second and a half of the Australian age record set in 2010 by Jayden Hadler. Previously in the meet, Neill swept the 200 (1:49.18), 400 (3:50.99) and 800 (7:59.05) frees, while also taking second in the 100 free (50.75) and 400 IM (4:22.07).

Se-Bom Lee came within a half-second of the Australian age record in the 17-year-olds 200 back. Lee was 1:59.53, with the age record standing at 1:59.09 from Mitch Larkin.

Another relatively close age record shave: Jenna Forrester‘s 2:00.36 200 free in the 15-year-olds division. Forrester’s time is exactly 0.99 off the age record set last year by Lani Pallister.

14-year-old Ella Ramsay won again in her age bracket. She headlined the opening day with an Australian age record 2:14.89 in the 200 IM, and followed up today with a 4:49.66 win in the 400 IM.

Most competitors will wrap up the meet tomorrow, with several multi-class para-events taking place tomorrow through Monday.

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nuotofan

Other remarkable swims. Two wins for 16 year-old Peiniger: 59.14 in the 100 fly and 2.14.31 in the 200 Im; 2.28.53 in the 200 breastroke for 15 year-old Tara Kinder and great 28.04 in the 50 back (lead-off 4×50 medley relay) for 16 year-old Bronte Job.

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Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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