Milak “Almost Threw Up” in the Call Room Before 1:51 200 Butterfly

2021 LEN EUROPEAN AQUATICS CHAMPIONSHIPS

Following his Championship record-breaking performance in the 200 butterfly, Hungarian world record holder Kristof Milak explained that he felt “tense” before the race, almost throwing up in the ready room. 

“I don’t know why but I got really tense in the call room, almost had to throw up,” Milak said. “This happens sometimes, especially before the 200m fly when I don’t feel that I’m in really good shape. I need that confidence before the top races so it was a kind of guessing what would happen here, it was a spontaneous swim, I may say.” 

Regarding his thought process throughout the race, Milak said that he “just wanted to control the technical part” of his stroke, and that he was motivated to pass Italian Federico Burdisso going into the final 50 of the race. Milak explained that he had little idea what time he had actually finished in, and was pleased with a 1:51. 

“Throughout the race I just wanted to control the technical part, I saw the Italian guy turning behind me before the last 50m so I thought my finish would be OK though I didn’t have any idea where we stood with the times. Well, at the end it turned out to be 1.51.1, so I cannot complain…”

As originally reported by James Sutherland 

MEN’S 200 FLY FINAL

  • European Record: 1:50.73, Kristof Milak (HUN), 2019
  • European Championship Record: 1:52.79, Kristof Milak (HUN), 2018
  • FINA ‘A’ Cut: 1:56.48
  1. Kristof Milak (HUN), 1:51.10 CR
  2. Federico Burdisso (ITA), 1:54.28
  3. Tamas Kenderesi (HUN), 1:54.43

Kristof Milak may have lulled us into a false sense of security through the early rounds of the men’s 200 fly.

After a pair of easy 1:54s, the Hungarian world record holder dropped the second-fastest swim in history to defend his European title, dropping a 1:51.10. The showing smashes his Championship Record of 1:52.79 set in 2018, and overtakes his 1:51.40 from earlier this year for #1 in the 2020-21 world rankings.

All three medalists are the same as they were three years ago in Glasgow, with Federico Burdisso and Tamas Kenderesi just switching places.

Burdisso moves up from bronze to silver with his time of 1:54.28, breaking his Italian Record of 1:54.39 in the process. Burdisso was a clear second at the 150, up by 1.38 seconds on Kenderesi, but struggled down the last lap in 31.32, narrowly holding off the Hungarian by .15.

Fourth and fifth-place finishers Antani Ivanov and Noe Ponti lowered their respective Bulgarian and Swiss National Records in 1:54.50 and 1:55.18.

Other Quotes:

  • Following her victory in the women’s 100 breaststroke, Sophie Hansson stated, “I feel amazing, this is a dream come true. Honestly, I’m speechless… But I feel very grateful for all those around me – only a few weeks ago I tried to get my time under 1:07 and now I’m under 1:06 so all my hard training paid off. I’m really excited for the future.”
  • Although he was upset in his signature 1500m freestyle race, Italian distance star Gregorio Paltrinieri said that he is satisfied with his time, “I tried to start off strong and see how it goes. Somewhere halfway I started feeling tiredness, probably because of the open water races last week. For now, 14:42 is a very good time, I’m really satisfied. Looking at the summer, this is a great starting point.”
  • Russian sprinter Kliment Kolesnikov commented on missing the finals of the 100m backstroke shortly after winning the 100 freestyle, stating, “I was just tired. It’s something can happen to you. It was our common decision with my coach to swim the back as we hoped I could do it. It turned out that I could not at this moment. Anyway, we are not giving up the idea for the Olympics but we will work more on it.”

 

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Mr Piano
2 months ago

He’s really improved his underwaters, and yet he still doesn’t do a dolphin kick on his first stroke on the breakout, I wonder what the rational is for that? I also appreciate how he held 19 stokes on the last 50 of fly, when he did 20 strokes in 2019, and Phelps always did 20 as well. This is very good news for Tokyo

Togger
2 months ago

I have to say I sympathise with Kristof. I’ve lost count of how many times I sat in the ready room thinking “God I’m feeling pretty beat up, not sure I’ll even break 1:52 in this 200 fly.”

Mr Piano
Reply to  Togger
2 months ago

Same but in short course

Last edited 2 months ago by Mr Piano
Rafael
Reply to  Mr Piano
2 months ago

With Fins..

There's no doubt that he's tightening up
Reply to  Rafael
2 months ago

For freestyle…

Rafael

fully rested and with someone as duck

Coach Rob
Reply to  Rafael
2 months ago

This comment thread is fire

dddddddd

in a 100

swimmerfromcali
2 months ago

What a legend.

Philip Johnson
2 months ago

If there’s a shoe-in for a gold medal, it’s this guy in the 200 fly.

Hswimmer
Reply to  Philip Johnson
2 months ago

Like Ledecky in 400,800,1500

Mr Piano
Reply to  Hswimmer
2 months ago

Ledecky in 800 and 1500. Titmus will make it closer in the 400

Hswimmer
Reply to  Mr Piano
2 months ago

Okay.

Philip Johnson
Reply to  Hswimmer
2 months ago

That too.

monsterbasher
2 months ago

Throwing up before a 200 fly because you’re nervous to hell? Same

Sunday Morning Grind
2 months ago

I too, hate not being in shape and only mustering a 1:51. Clearly needs to get back to the grind if he wants to be ready come Tokyo.

Sam B
2 months ago

Chad must be thinking his readdy-room shady boxing will probably do the trick

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Nicole Miller

Nicole has been with SwimSwam since April 2020, as both a reporter and social media contributor. Prior to joining the SwimSwam platform, Nicole also managed a successful Instagram platform, amassing over 20,000 followers. Currently, Nicole is pursuing her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where she is an active …

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