Madisyn Cox Goes World-Leading Time in 200 IM at Longhorn Invite

2019 LONGHORN INVITE

  • January 17-19, 2019
  • Austin, TX
  • Results
  • LCM

Madisyn Cox of Longhorn Aquatics stole the show tonight, dominating the 200 IM with a 2:10.29. For Cox, that was an outstanding swim. This was not far off of her best time, a 2:09.69 from 2017 US Summer Nationals, and this was her best in-season swim ever. Previously, her only time under 2:11 from a non-championship meet was 2:10.98 from the Austin PSS in January 2018, about a year ago.

Cox shoots past American Melanie Margalis to the #1 time in the world this year. Tonight, she beat Texas sophomore Evie Pfeifer (2:15.78).

2018-2019 LCM WOMEN 200 IM

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4Yui
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5Shiwen
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View Top 26»

Longhorn Aquatics’ Clark Smith was well under four minutes in the men’s 400 free, winning it in 3:53.17. That’s a solid time for Smith, less than a second off of what he went at this meet last year. The women’s race went to Santa Clara Swim Club’s Nicole Oliva (4:17.26). The 17-year-old Oliva, who represents the Philippines internationally, was nine-tenths off of her lifetime best of 4:16.29 from the 2018 Pan Pacs.

Texas senior John Shebat clocked the win in the 200 IM, going 2:02.81 for his best in-season long course 200 IM ever. Denver Hilltoppers’ William Goodwin was 2:05.43 for 2nd, a lifetime best for the Mizzou commit.

OTHER WINNERS

  • Texas freshman Grace Ariola won the women’s 50 free in 25.37, an improvement on the 25.89 she posted at this time last year.
  • Texas sophomore Preston Varozza was 57.15 to take the men’s 100 back.
  • The women’s 100 back went to 16-year-old Greer Pattison (1:03.87) of Scottsdale Aquatic Club.
  • Angela Quan of Santa Clara Swim Club, 14 years old, hit a new personal best of 1:02.78 to win the 100 fly. That was nearly a full second off of her old best.
  • Kyle Robrock of Denver Hilltoppers went 23.13 to edge Texas frosh Daniel Krueger (23.29) in the men’s 50 free.

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afatdad

At my very best, if I swam shaved and tapered on Jan 1st, I think I could be the world best through about Jan 2nd. You?

Really

Boss lady.

Swimswum

Must have been drinking a lot of that good tab water

TheTruth

It’s quite sad that an athlete can be wrongfully accused of knowingly taking a microscopic amount of a banned substance that cannot even be bought in her country, have no explanation as to where it came from so she offers whatever she can in a plea to continue her otherwise immaculate career, then finds an absolutely legitimate reason for the contamination in a substance the same wrongful accusers told her she could take (so she didn’t retest in the intitial accusation), and miserable people like this still call her a cheat. Shame.

ArtVanDeLegh10

Because so many prominent athletes have lied about taking illegal substances, we’re conditioned to not believe anyone anymore.

Swimcanada

Unfortunately with their abilities to test to such micro traces these contamination cases are going to become more frequent. Cox’s amount was a 10th of a billionth or .0000000001 of a gram. A level of .1 nanogram is almost unfathomable

ChompChomp

Sounds a lot like the Hardy case. She repeated the narrative that she ‘proved’ the tainted supplement excuse but I still haven’t seen any public confirmation of that anywhere. Didn’t SS report a few weeks back that the manufacturer had not discovered any tainted products?

Swimcanada

That is not what SS said. A WADA certified lab reported that they found it in both an opened and a sealed bottle from the same lot number. This was not a powder or a capsule. It was a pressed tablet with 4 ng in each tablet. If you are going to try to smear someone at least get your facts straight.

About Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, graduating in May of 2018. He began swimming on a club team in first grade and swam four years for Wesleyan.

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