Juniors Day 4 – Dressel Makes Statement With Records From B Final

It’s night four of swimswam coverage here in Irvine, California at the USA Swimming 2013 Junior National Championships. This is the fastest Juniors we have seen in years, and the future of swimming continued to impress with three new meet records set tonight – making our total 14 so far.

Women’s 200 Freestyle

Quinn Carrozza, Texas Longhorn Aquatics, led wire-to-wire here in the finals of the women’s 200 freestyle. She was out at 27.61 at the first 50, and flipped well under a minute pace at 57.50.

Katherine Drabot (OZ) had a very strong wall coming off the hundred. She slightly challenged Carrozza, out splitting her on the third 50, 30.22 to 30.43. It wasn’t enough to overtake as Carrozza responded with a dominating closing kick and tempo to pull away from the field.

Carrozza finished at 1:58.31, just .04 from the meet record set by Olympian Lia Neal in 2011.

Katie McLaughlin (MVN) was out fourth at the 100, but used a strong back half to move to up second in 1:59.20. Katherine Drabot ended up third at 1:59.32.

Men’s 200 Freestyle

The A final was a close field at the half way mark, with just about every swimmer turning about a second within each other at the 100m mark. Following the textbook race strategy in the 200 freestyle, Gunnar Bentz (DYNA) made a move on the leader Blake Pieroni (DUNE).

Pieroni had about .5 on Bentz at the 150m, but Bentz laid the hammer down out splitting Pieroni 27.5 to 28.5, enough to surge him in front. Bentz took the title in 1:49.57. Bentz was key to Dynamo men’s winning and record setting 800 freestyle relay last night.

Pieroni fell to second in 1:49.98. Alexander Katz (SYS) was third at 1:50.17.

The real story was in the B final. Caeleb Dressel from Bolles failed to qualify in the A final this morning, finishing 9th in the preliminaries session. He came back tonight to absolutely light up the B final. Clearly out to prove he was the best in the water, he was out fast on the field.

Dressel smashed the NAG 15-16 record of 1:49.48 and meet record from Clay Youngquist in 2010 of 1:49.37 when he swam 1:48.64 tonight. He easily would have won the race tonight, but had to settle for 9th place proving that if you want a chance at the title, you have to get the job done in the morning.

Dressel has had a strong meet thus far, winning the 100 freestyle, finishing second the 100 butterfly and having the top time in the 200 freestyle tonight. He will go for the 50 freestyle title tomorrow.

Women’s 100 Breaststroke

She was the top seed with a great morning swim at 1:09.00 and Bethany Galat (SBSC) was able to back that up tonight. She won the women’s 100 breaststroke a little off her preliminary time at 1:09.59.

Galat had quick reaction time, registering at .59 easily visible ahead of the field. She had quick early speed out in the only 31 at the 50m mark. That quickness on the front half crept up on her slightly in the final 25m as Olivia Anderson (AQJT) and Kennedy Lohman (LAK) made their move.

Their effort weren’t enough to overtake Galat in the final 10m. Unfortunately, Kennedy Lohman DQ’ed with a flinch at the start, after finishing second unofficially. That moved Olivia Anderson to second at 1:09.37.

Maija Roses (MAC) finished third at 1:09.56.

Men’s 100 Breaststroke

Carsten Vissering (NCAP) was just .2 off the meet record this morning, and he had no intention of missing it tonight based off his swim. He had a commanding lead, way under record pace at the 50 turning at 28.97, the only sub 29 of the field.

He carried the lead through the finish to set a new 15-16 NAG and meet record with a time of 1:01.94. The old meet record belonged to Christian Higgins from 2009 at 1:02.29.

In a tough double, Gunnar Bentz (DYNA) came off his win from the 200 freestyle to finish second here at 1:02.39. He was turned last at the 50, the only 30 in the heat, but known for his closing speed he moved up fast and furious. He ran out of room and settled for second in his second race of the evening.

Andrew Schuehler (JW) was third, 1:02.73.

Women’s 100 Backstroke

Clara Smiddy (AKS) has struggled through knee injuries this past year. By the looks of her tonight, she has made a full recovery sealing it with a win the women’s 100 backstroke with a time of 1:00.51.

Smiddy had a small margin, out at 29.53, just slightly over Hannah Weiss (KING) who was 29.64. Off the turn, they remained even but Smiddy looked stronger over the final 25m, accelerating through the water pulling away from the field.

Kylie Stewart from Dynamo was in her second swim of the night after finishing 5th in the 200 freestyle earlier in the night. Stewart has very solid underwaters and she was able to finish 2nd at 1:01.44.

Weiss faded back to 3rd at 1:01.74.

Men’s 100 Backstroke

Hennessey Stuart (DSA) had an early lead at the 50m turning at 27.13. Ryan Harty (GMSC) was close behind at 27.44, with the rest of the field.

Harty then turned it on, increasing his stroke rate significantly and ramped up his kick. He passed Stuart by the final 15m, and held on for the win at 56.05.

Stuart fought hard all the way to the finish, almost looking like he would regain the lead. But Stuart had to settle for silver, as he finished second at 56.16.

Dayton Raiders had three swimmers make it to finals in this event. Joshua Quallen and Patrick Mulcare topped the B and C finals, while Henrik Pohlmann finished 3rd in the A final at 56.71.

Women’s 800 Freestyle Relay

The women had their turn at the 800 freestyle relays tonight. From the second heat tonight, York YMCA came home with a new meet record with a time of 8:10.13. The record belonged to North Baltimore set last year.

York, with the team of Courtney Harnish (2:02.66), Nicole Price (2:02.87), Emily Ilgenfritz (2:03.48) & Meghan Small (2:01.12), they were steadily under pace the whole race, and hung in second place to Mission Viejo after three exchanges.

Dynamo spread with their two A finalists in the 200 freestyle from earlier tonight, Kylie Stewart and Nicole Stafford to keep them in the hunt. Stafford had a pounding kick to split 2:00.96 to surpass Mission to get second at 8:15.06 to 8:15.69.

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Chris
8 years ago

Connor Green from ABF was 2nd in the Men’s 100 back, not Stuart, which makes for a 1-2 for New England in that event.

C Martin
Reply to  Chris
8 years ago

Go New England!

Bert Andernie
8 years ago

The Penn State class is having a good meet. Schuehler, Bantley, and Stasiunas all putting up times.

With the returning talent, all they need is a coach…

Klorn8d
Reply to  Bert Andernie
8 years ago

Yeah NCAP is gigantic and had a bunch of different sites, there are two sites that haw most of the high school talent though, the Georgetown prep site in Rockville md has vissering, ledecky, Brian tsau, Gavin springer, grant Goddard and more. I’m less sure about everyone else but the Tyson site in Tyson Virginia had seliskar, Janet and Phil hu, Megan Byrnes and I think Cassidy Bayer. Then the rest is spread out between the billion other sites

Klorn8d
Reply to  Klorn8d
8 years ago

That was meant for jimmy, my bad

Kevin T
8 years ago

Does anyone know if Dresses is going to be a junior or senior in high school? Man this guy is GOOD!

coach
Reply to  Kevin T
8 years ago

Rising senior.

Jimmy
8 years ago

Doesn’t Vissering swim with the same coach as Ledecky? They’re having a heck of a run.

bobo gigi
8 years ago

Again, I read about Mr Dressel that he easily would have won the race tonight. Amanda, how do you know it? If X had swum X tonight he would have won. With if! Nobody knows what it would have happened if Mr Dressel had swum the A-Final. He has swum very relaxed in the B-Final well ahead of the others. Perhaps he would have done the same race in the A-Final, perhaps not. I’d prefer to read simply his time was the fastest of the day. That’s all.

aswimfan
Reply to  bobo gigi
8 years ago

I agree with Bobo Gigi.

It’s really a disservice to the winners when someone said “X would have won the race easily if only they would have swum the race…”

NO ONE won the race UNLESS they swim in it.

PsychoDad
Reply to  aswimfan
8 years ago

I think she meant that time would have won the A final.

Bourdais
Reply to  PsychoDad
8 years ago

Again, not necessarily. How do you know Bentz wouldn’t have swum faster with Dressel to motivate him or draft off? Unlikely perhaps, but you can’t be sure. I agree with Bobo and Aswimfan, stick to what we know for sure (I.e what actually happened) and avoid making “what if” statements unless we’re talking casually.

PsychoDad
Reply to  Bourdais
8 years ago

I am sticking with what I know for sure; again, I think she meant “it would have known easily a final GIVEN times they swam already” – simple math.
I was not arguing with Bobo (although I like to do that) and Aswimfan – just trying to understand what she meant.

gosharks
Reply to  Bourdais
8 years ago

PsychoDad – And what you know for sure is what you think she meant?

bobo gigi
Reply to  bobo gigi
8 years ago

The world’s gone crazy!

bobo gigi
8 years ago

Another great day of swimming.

Women’s 200 free.
4 girls under 2 minutes.
Good and logical win for Miss Carrozza. She has attacked her race from the start. 1.58.31. Great performance.
2nd place for Katie McLaughlin. Not disappointing. Her previous PB was 2.01.05. She has crushed it in 1.59.20.
Katerine Drabot deserves recognition. She has a great meet so far. Previous PB of 2.02.45. End of the day, 1.59.32.

Men’s 200 free.
Tactical race.
Mr Bentz has again shown his huge finish. 1.49.57. New PB. He hasn’t for the moment enough speed to start fast his races but when he will have eaten a few steaks and will have gone to the weight room,… Read more »

aswimfan
8 years ago

I’m confused.

Is Josepf bentz the same as Gunnar Bentz?

bobo gigi
Reply to  aswimfan
8 years ago

They are the same. 🙂

aswimfan
Reply to  bobo gigi
8 years ago

Then he is a truly special swimmer with such great range.

PsychoDad
Reply to  aswimfan
8 years ago

For those who do not know – USA Swimming allows you to use your nickname in your registration and a lot of meets will use your nickname in the head sheet and results. Obviously, USA Open does not.

whoknows
Reply to  PsychoDad
8 years ago

Entry into the US Open, and Juniors (any USA Swimming sponsored meets) use the OME system. The system does not recognize the preferred name; therefore, you will see the legal names in the heat sheets and results.

aswimfan
8 years ago

What are Caeleb Dressel’s PBs in 50 and 100?

And whats his date of birth?

bobo gigi
Reply to  aswimfan
8 years ago

For the moment (50 free tonight), 22.59 and 49.28.
His DOB is August 16, 1996.

aswimfan
Reply to  bobo gigi
8 years ago

Are those american age records?

the 49.28 is awfully fast, it must be world record for 16 yo.

Wonder if he can lower it again before turning 17 next week.

bobo gigi
Reply to  aswimfan
8 years ago

Yes, 15/16 NAG records.
World record? Probably. McEvoy and Sedov were slower at the same age.
I believe this meet in Irvine is his last meet as a 16-year-old guy.

bobo gigi
Reply to  bobo gigi
8 years ago

I have watched his interview and he says he has a time trial today in the 100 free. He believes he has a 48 in the tank.

whoknows
Reply to  aswimfan
8 years ago

fastest times I have found for 16 year old is 22.44 – Morozov, 49.28 – Dressel (only other under 50 that I found was Stjepanovic in 2010 at 49.56.)

Rafael
Reply to  whoknows
8 years ago

McEvoy was 49.70..

Thorpe was 50.21 at 15.. but never found how much he did at 16… (on Briefs!)

SWIMSWIMSWIM
Reply to  whoknows
8 years ago

Thorpe was 16 at the 1999 Pan Pacs. His times were 1:46.00, 3:41.83 and he split a 48.55 anchoring the 4×100 relay that was much faster than his individual best of 49.98. The next year at olympic trials as a 17 year old he wen 49.7.

aswimfan
Reply to  whoknows
8 years ago

In the 1999 Pan Pacs where he broke 200 WR twice (1:46.34 and 1:46.00) and 400 WR (3:41.83), he swam 49.71 in the 100 free prelims but could not advance to final as the third fastest australian, although he was fourth fastest overall. Had he swum in the final I am pretty sure he would have been a lot faster.
Why? because 3 days earlier, just less than an hour after breaking 400 WR, he anchored australia’s 4×100 free to the win over USA in 48.55.

Yes, all of those while he was still 16 yo AND IN BRIEFS, and it was 14 years ago.

aswimfan
Reply to  whoknows
8 years ago

oops.. I did not refresh and swimswimswim already wrote, but it is impartial.

Thorpe actually swam 49.71 in the prelims of 100 free, but could not advance to the final although he was fourth fastest (behind michael klim, neil walker and chris fydler) because he was only third fastest australian.

So 49.71 is Thorpe’s official PB as 16 yo, but we know he anchored in 48.55 three days earlier less than an hour after breaking 400 free WR.

aswimfan
Reply to  whoknows
8 years ago

and I agree with those who said that as good as coaches they were, Doug Frost and Tracey Menzies didn’t really fully realize Thorpe’s potential.

It’s a pity that he could not go the Agnel way and moved to NBAC and trained with Bob Bowman.

About Amanda Smith

Amanda Smith is a former swimmer at both Indiana and USC, where she earned a total of nine All-American honors at the NCAA Championships. Smith, a middle-distance specialist as a swimmer, was also 3-time USC School Record holder, a 2012 NCAA Woman of the Year nominee, and an Olympic Trials …

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