Hopkin Posts Fastest 50 FR Split Ever in 20.2, Brown Ties SEC Meet Record

2020 SEC SWIMMING & DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Update: in spite of Hopkin recording a -.05 reaction time, meet officials declared an equipment malfunction when video review showed it clearly that Arkansas’ leadoff leg Kobie Melton touched the pad while Hopkin’s toe was still on the block. It is within the bounds of NCAA rules to overturn the touchpads when officials can confirm a clear equipment malfunction. The video was reviewed by equipment manufacturer Omega, the meet referee, and an SEC admin. A video appears as though the leadoff leg, Kobie Melton, almost took an extra stroke, but on a bit of a weird finish probably registered a soft touch. So, the swim was legal, but that means that the split was probably not quite as fast as 20.27. It was still probably the fastest, or very close to the fastest, swim, as the error in the touchpad didn’t appear to be .18 seconds.

Arkansas’ Anna Hopkin made history on Wednesday night at the 2020 SEC Championships. On the 2nd leg of Arkansas’ 200 free relay, Hopkin raced to a 20.27 split. That’s the fastest 50 free relay split in history, ahead of the former mark by nearly 2 tenths. Before tonight, Simone Manuel and Abbey Weitzeil had shared the fastest ever in 20.45.

Tennessee’s Erika Brown also had a notable swim. She led off for the Vols in 21.15, tying her own SEC Meet Record from last season. The Volunteers wound up taking silver in the final. Arkansas placed 4th.

Coming into this meet, Brown and Hopkin were tied as the fastest in the SEC with a 21.19. Brown then matched that season-leading time with her prelims swim to take the top seed for tonight’s final. Hopkin is the 2nd seed there, and the women will go head-to-head for the title. Brown currently owns back-to-back titles in the event.

Arkansas entered the meet with an NCAA “A” cut already thanks to a 1:28.39 mid-season, and improved that on Thursday to a 1:27.93 and a 4th-place finish.

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Jim
2 years ago

So, am I the only one to point out that she had a -0.05 reaction time? Can someone confirm the NCAA rules? Is a swimmer allowed on a relay start to be in the minus so long as it’s within a certain amount, like 0 to -0.05, or 0 to -0.09 seconds? I know that’s a different rule than hs. I mean, that does not take away from how fast this swim really is…it’s legit. But I just would like to know how it was allowed. Reading the article, they talk about an equipment malfunction and based off a video review…how can they assess that if they do not have an underwater camera sync’d up to an above water camera,… Read more »

Swimdad
2 years ago

Coach Harper has done a great job with Ana Hopkin. She was a talented swimmer when he recruited her from the UK but she has become a legitimate world class swimmer.

VFL
2 years ago
VFL
Reply to  VFL
2 years ago

I hand timed it at 20.4 once and 20.5 five times.

toastedcoconut
Reply to  VFL
2 years ago

^^ same here, also she should’ve been DQ’d for the start like bro get some glasses

Taa
Reply to  VFL
2 years ago

I got 20.4 o r 5 and the leadoff was 22.7 or 8. Total was 43.30 so I think it’s 22.8 and 20.5 and Hopkins had a neg reaction time which makes her more like a 20.6

Gator
2 years ago

*depending on the previous record reaction times

Gator
2 years ago

Even if you figure in an early takeoff, it’s still easily the fastest ever in the history of the World

toastedcoconut
2 years ago

So if this is true, how did she only split 20.82 yesterday? How does one drop 0.6 seconds in a 50 free in one day?? Doesn’t add up to me, and it seems to be jumping the gun to be reporting this with no video evidence to back it up.

dewey
Reply to  toastedcoconut
2 years ago

I did that many times when I was going for my 50 free trials cut and swimming a bunch of time trials and 50 splits in longer races in addition to the actual 50 free race. Having a better dive, a better timed breakout, faster tempo changed my times wildly. At the meet where I qualified and went 26.1 I went a 26.8 the day prior.

spectatorn
Reply to  toastedcoconut
2 years ago

reaction time was 0.28s yesterday, -0.05s today. That took out 0.33s from the split difference (0.55s). Her difference in swimming time is 0.22s, which seems “acceptable” variation between two swims.

toastedcoconut
Reply to  spectatorn
2 years ago

Aaaaaaand she follows it up with a 21.4 flat start. I’m not convinced in the slightest.

swimboi
Reply to  toastedcoconut
2 years ago

hard to compare. the 20.2 was a relay split, her first swim of the night, and much less pressure on the second leg of an underdog relay that’s trying to just move up, compared to the second swim of the night where she now has to follow up the 20.2 and is competing for an individual title where nerves set in a bit more. i am somewhat skeptical until there’s video but it’s not uncommon to significantly outperform yourself on a relay

Taa
2 years ago

I’m wondering if its a legit split. The leadoff girl was 22.63 at midseason meet but only 23.03 tonight? someone should hand itme it or look at the changeover

Admin
Reply to  Taa
2 years ago

If we can find video, we will definitely hand time.

The split *makes sense* for Hopkin. But, you make a good point on the leadoff.

Admin
Reply to  Braden Keith
2 years ago

We have been told that video review by officials confirmed Hopkin’s start was legal. More details have been added above.

DrSwimPhil
Reply to  Braden Keith
2 years ago

-.05 is usually seen by the naked eye, which means this is definitely a touch-pad deal on the leadoff swimmer’s finish. I know you have that in the write-up, but I’m willing to bet it was more significant than just .18 of a difference.

toastedcoconut
Reply to  Taa
2 years ago

Yeah seems a bit sus. Although if it is legit she should theoretically be 20.xx easily in the individual so we’ll see

DrSwimPhil
Reply to  Taa
2 years ago

Leadoff’s 25 splits were 10.96/12.07. Given most were coming home roughly 11.5s on average, yeah, something is up with the touch (which probably also explains why the -.05 was allowed).

Tomek
2 years ago

meet results show reaction time for Hopkins as -0.05?

Troy
Reply to  Tomek
2 years ago

plus or minus .1 is safe. so her split is good

Paul Windrath
Reply to  Troy
2 years ago

It used to be .03, when did it change?

Admin
Reply to  Paul Windrath
2 years ago

It depends on the equipment manufacturer. There is no actual specific time standard listed in the rulebook, it’s based on the manufacturer’s starting point.

Tomek
Reply to  Troy
2 years ago

c. If the electronic relay takeoff equipment detects an exchange differential
(takeoff pad time minus finish pad time) of –0.09 through +0.09 second
inclusive from the manufacturer’s starting point, the decision(s) of the
human judge(s) shall not be considered. The determination of the electronic
relay takeoff equipment shall be official, with exchange differential of –0.09
through –0.01 second from the manufacturer’s starting point indicating
a rules violation and values of 0.00 through +0.09 second indicating a
legitimate relay exchange.
d. If the electronic relay takeoff equipment records an exchange differential
outside of the range –0.09 through +0.09 second from the manufacturer’s
starting point, a disqualification shall occur if there is… Read more »

About Lauren Neidigh

Lauren Neidigh

Lauren Neidigh is a former NCAA swimmer at the University of Arizona (2013-2015) and the University of Florida (2011-2013). While her college swimming career left a bit to be desired, her Snapchat chin selfies and hot takes on Twitter do not disappoint. She's also a high school graduate of The …

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