40+ College Swimmers Sign Petition Asking NCAA Not to Host Events in Idaho

Forty-three college swimmers and one former pro, Casey Legler, have signed letters to the NCAA asking the association to bar the state of Idaho from hosting NCAA-sponsored event over House Bill 500, which was signed into law March 30, Sports Illustrated reported Wednesday.

The bill – called the “Fairness in Women’s Sports Act” – bans transgender women and girls from competing in women’s and girls’ sports at the high school and collegiate level in Idaho, making the state the first in the country to pass legislation against transgender students. It applies to “interscholastic, intercollegiate, intramural, or club athletic teams or sports that are sponsored by a public school or any school that is a member of the Idaho high school activities association or a public institution of higher education or any higher education institution that is a member of the national collegiate 6 athletic association (NCAA), national association of intercollegiate athletics (NAIA), or national junior college athletic association.”

It mandates that teams be designated as based on biological sex – Males, men, or boys; Females, women, or girls; or coed or mixed – and that “sports designated for females, women, or girls shall not be open to students of the male sex.”

The letters specifically ask that the 2021 NCAA men’s basketball tournament, slated for March 18-20 at ExtraMile Arena in Boise, be moved.

“Given Idaho’s adoption of a discriminatory law that directly impacts college athletics, violates NCAA values, and undermines the dignity and well-being of NCAA athletes, Idaho schools no longer qualify to host NCAA events,” the letter says.

Over 400 student-athletes signed their letter, which can be viewed here. Forty-three swimmers are listed as signatories, led by 11 from the Duke University team. Swimmers from the University of Michigan, Washington University in St. Louis, and Johns Hopkins also signed.

Nearly 50 professionals, including 1996 Olympic swimmer Casey Legler, signed another letter, which can be viewed here. Former and current professional sports stars including Billie Jean King, Megan Rapinoe, Sue Bird, Reggie Bullock and Jessica Mendoza are among the signatories. Duathlete Chris Mosier, the first known out trans athlete to join a U.S. national team different from his sex at birth, is also listed.

Previously, the NCAA has moved events due to discriminatory laws.

According to SI, the association moved seven championship events out of the state of North Carolina for the 2016–17 season after the state passed House Bill 2 (colloquially known as the “Bathroom Bill”) which banned people from using public bathrooms that don’t correspond to their biological sex as listed on their birth certificate.

The North Carolina bill was repealed and the NCAA went back to hosting events in the state.

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Make America Logical Again
4 months ago

So it seems in this case someone gets discriminated against regardless. Either biological men get to compete in women’s sports and thus hard working women are discriminated against because they don’t get to compete on a fair playing field. Or a very very small minority of people don’t get to compete as the gender they feel they are. The NCAA supports fair play and I don’t see how ensuring that exists for women violates the NCAA’s values… MALA!!

Ladyvoldisser
Reply to  Make America Logical Again
4 months ago

The NCAA does not support fair play in reality. The NCAA is a sham organization. Could care less where competitions are held as long as the fastest and strongest win. Good however to see the liberal whiners finally getting what they brought on others when NOW pressured Congress to pass title niner.

TEEL
Reply to  Make America Logical Again
4 months ago

I’d be interested to know how many people actually support transgender woman competing against biological women. Because I mean, it seems quite self-evident its perhaps not a great idea. Is it just a very vocal minority? To qualify this, I have no problem with trans people at all, they’re lovely people. But surely this is something that’s just quite obvious in it’s unfairness to women born as women. Not to say that trans women shouldn’t be able to play sports, but at regulated competitive level it’s hard to justify. Like it seems like pretty much all trans people would agree with this and there should be a focus on actual trans discrimination issues. All this seems to do is create… Read more »

SwamaJammaDingDong
Reply to  TEEL
4 months ago

“nearly 50” out of 7.8 billion people… So they have that going for them. 🙂

Swimmy
Reply to  TEEL
4 months ago

Trans people shouldn’t be banned, there are ways for them to be able to join and compete. Whether they score or take a varsity spot is actually fair to debate but they shouldn’t loose the opportunity to be a part of the sport

brol
Reply to  Swimmy
4 months ago

Agreed

coco
4 months ago

can someone explain how it is fair to allow biological men to compete against them? I don’t want to start a fight but I do not understand the logic. If this is allowed then lets lump all men and woman into the same category thus eliminating any gender. I am for Trans rights but this does not make sense to me. If they want to compete as woman then they should have their won category.

Anonymous
Reply to  coco
4 months ago

Because there’s immense hormonal regulations and they have to be on hormones for a year before they can compete. There is also no such thing as “biological male” or “biological female”. Modern scientific research is showing a spectrum of sex and secondary sex characteristics. To claim all people born with one form of genitalia have the same biology is reductionary and ignores the innate complexity of human biology (which again can’t be reduced to simply ones genitalia).

daman
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

Yup lets just ignore the effects of testosterone have on the development of a body and act like after a year of hormonal regulation the developmental effects will just magically disappear.

Falcon
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

XX,XY,and occasional XXY. That’s all there is.

daman
Reply to  Falcon
4 months ago

XYY is a thing too. The thing is where is the line drawn. We can set a testosterone level but then many elite women athletes of our time may fall above that which is what makes them better. But I see this scenario getting out of hand to where they will say I don’t want the hormone therapy because of the risks/side effects and we will be forced to let it go so we don’t hurt anyone’s feelings I would think no man would want to compete against women just to win but you know they are out there. It’s like leaving the wall early in sets, everyone knows what’s going on. I think the NCAA doesn’t want to touch… Read more »

Bill Price
Reply to  daman
4 months ago

It’s not a matter of testosterone level no matter what the rules require. Biological males have an advantage over biological females and will always have this advantage. Artificially lowering it with performance inhibiting drugs (think about that) is a silly attempt to justify, defend, or protect a social agenda. This social agenda may have legitimate traction in other areas of life but in athletics it just doesn’t make sense.

Dcswim
Reply to  Falcon
4 months ago

It seems like you’re missing out on some other kinds of sex chromosome variations that you could’ve found with a quick google search.

45 (X0), Turner Syndrome
47, XYY syndrome
47, (XXX) trisomy X
47, (XXY) Klinefelter Syndrome
48-XXYY Syndrome
48,XXXX (Tetrasomy X)
49,XXXXX (Pentasomy X)
48, XYYY
48, XYYY syndrome

Swimmom
Reply to  Falcon
4 months ago

This is incorrect, there are several other XY variations. Most are not advantageous to sports, but they do exist.
https://genetic.org/variations/

Ladyvoldisser
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

Highly biased “MODERN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH” which is a pile of liberal, psycho fueled horse droppings.

The Kraken
Reply to  Ladyvoldisser
4 months ago

Have you ever tried getting research published? It’s not as easy as you’d think, and the process is quite rigorous.

Could you point to any problems that you’ve found in papers published in respected journals? Perhaps sampling error, methodology issues, or problems with survey questions?

Ladyvoldisser
Reply to  The Kraken
4 months ago

To answer your questions; YES, yes but not worth the time and all three.

meeeee
Reply to  The Kraken
4 months ago

Yes, i am published and it is a process indeed. However, i point you to the recent LANCET (currently ranked second out of 160 journals in the Medicine, General & Internal) retraction of a major hydroxychloroquine study last week for starters. The New Sokal Hoax really shows the issues with journals that have an agenda: https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/10/new-sokal-hoax/572212/

And the scientific field is ripe with predatory journals that will publish just about anything without peer review. So there’s that.

Brol
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

To say that being on female hormones for one year levels the playing field “ignores the innate complexity of human biology “ I agree with another commentator that if one goes through puberty as a male, that individual will have acquired beneficial physical characteristics that will not be reversible. They will have developed a body frame that will impart a physical advantage indefinitely. It is extremely unfair to biological women and in certain sports ( combat) dangerous . The real issue here is not about transgender rights but competitive fairness

Rational Human Being
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

This is ridiculous. Watch the youtube video of the track runner who supposedly went on hormone therapy, and who competed as a male for 3 yrs, (very average at best against the males) “transition “ and run against the girls. He absolutely SMOKED the field. Watch that video amd tell me thats ok.

Kate
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

The trans high school sprinters in Connecticut were under no hormone treatment at all. Both were middling/average runners as boys, but when they switched to competing against girls they absolutely blew them off the track. One of them continued to present as male socially, even while displacing girls in sports.

It’s undeniable that going through male puberty gives permanent athletic advantages. A year of hormone treatment cannot undo that.

Corn Pop
4 months ago

The Allstar team of Krystle & Larry brought to you by Duke & Michigan . A peek at the UWSL teams look very white . Interesting they hoist this outrage above fostering & even developing local black swimmers . Maybe the diving team is all black but elsewhere t h at day.

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About Torrey Hart

Torrey Hart

Torrey is from Oakland, CA, and majored in media studies and American studies at Claremont McKenna College, where she swam distance freestyle for the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps team. Outside of SwimSwam, she has bylines at Sports Illustrated, Yahoo Sports, SB Nation, and The Student Life newspaper.

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