#3 commit in Class of 2016 Grant Shoults gives verbal to Stanford Cardinal

Grant Shoults, one of the top recruits in the nation, has given his verbal commitment to the Stanford Cardinal for 2016 and onwards.

We recently ranked Shoults #3 in our rankings of the top NCAA prospects in the nation, and he comes in with some huge times, including the recruiting class’s best 200 and 500 frees.

“I’m proud to share that I have the privilege of verbally committing to the Stanford Cardinal to be a student-athlete,” Shoults told SwimSwam. “For me, Stanford was the ‘whole package’. It represented what I was seeking from swimming with Coach Knapp and Coach Armstrong on the deck, a great group of guys in the water and an academic platform to help prepare me for life after swimming.”

This is a gigantic pickup for Stanford, which is moving on without NCAA and American record-holder David Nolan this coming season, and needs some big-time talents to replace him.

Shoults comes out of the Mission Viejo Nadadores program in Southern California, a team known for training tough, distance-oriented swimmers under coach Bill Rose. Shoults is no exception to that rule, projecting as a multi-distance freestyle threat in the college ranks, with some outside potential in the butterfly and IM races as well.

Shoults’ Top Times

  • 200 free – 1:34.54
  • 500 free – 4:15.56
  • 1650 free – 15:14.40
  • 200 fly – 1:45.32
  • 100 fly – 49.26

Shoults also adds a 1:48.28 in the 200 IM and a 3:59.51 in the 400 IM. His outstanding 200 free should make him an instant relay factor – he would have been Stanford’s third-fastest swimmer on the 3rd-place 800 free relay at NCAAs last year.

And his 44.66 in the 100 free that suggests he could eventually become a relay factor over the 4×100 yard distances too, if he develops his speed well in Palo Alto.

Shoults competes for Mission Viejo and Santa Margarita Catholic High School in California.

Stanford took 6th as a team at last year’s NCAA Championships. Shoults took time to express his gratitude for all the teams he met with during the recruiting process:

“The NCAA coaches and their staff that I have developed relationships with over the past 12 months were incredible,” he said. “As swimmers, we are blessed to participate in a sport with leaders with so much character and class. Thank you to those that shared their time and programs with me.

“Thank you to those who have supported me in this journey. ‘Fear the Tree!’”

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GAA
6 years ago

As a Stanford alum, I am happy to see that he will be a Cardinal, but my question is, why is he not there already? My daughter is also a high school senior, has an almost identical birthday to his, except that she, like almost all of her classmates, was born in 1998, not 1997. Won’t Grant be 19 before he graduates high school? What’s the story?

2x8thgrade
Reply to  GAA
6 years ago

Same story as lots of HS athletes – “red shirting” before they start HS so their parents can stoke their egos. Grant’s a great swimmer, but he’s truly a freshman in college.

Admin
Reply to  2x8thgrade
6 years ago

2x8grade – I think that’s an overstatement. He was 18 when he swam his last high school meet, which is the same age that many (most if you’re just looking at California) swimmers are when they swim their last high school meet. If he were in college, he’d be one of the youngest. In high school, he’s one of the oldest. Damned if he does, damned if he doesn’t.

2x8thgrade
Reply to  Braden Keith
6 years ago

It’s not an overstatement – a 19 year old is not normal for high school (anywhere)! “He was 18” relates to age group swimming which is completely fair, but a 19 year old in HS is way outside the norm. Kostoff swam 4:16 when is was 17 and 8mos. Conger’s 4:13 18 and 4mos

Admin
Reply to  2x8thgrade
6 years ago

2x8thgrade – he was not 19 in high school. He turned 19 on June 6th. The last day of final exams for seniors at St. Margarita Catholic High School was May 26th, and Grant graduated on June 2nd. He was 18 when he swam his last high school meet, he was 18 when he took his last high school exam, and he was 18 when he graduated from high school.

2x8thgrade
Reply to  Braden Keith
6 years ago

You’re missing the point I’m trying to make (and GAA as I understand it) – exact age at the time of the accomplishment is most relevant, not your grade level.

Admin
Reply to  2x8thgrade
6 years ago

2x8thgrad – I am missing the point you’re trying to make. I really don’t understand. What accomplishment are you trying to declare that he was 19 during? Since turning 19, 9 days ago, he hasn’t swum a race. He committed to Stanford at 18. He graduated high school at 18. He swam his National High School Record at 18. What is it that he’s done at the age of 19 that you’re trying to say he had an advantage with as compared to other high school swimmers?

2x8thgrade
Reply to  Braden Keith
6 years ago

I’m unknowing why Grant was allegedly held back a grade – I’m sure there is a good explanation. You are seemingly well informed, perhaps you know? To me, it makes no difference whether he was held back intentionally or if it was unavoidable – his accomplishments (this year) should be compared to a freshman in college rather than a “true” senior (or that of Kostoff and Conger).

MD swim parent
7 years ago

Training with Egan may turn Shoults away from the 200 fly and toward the 1650. Egan trains super distance, and the two of them appear to be great friends, based on what I’ve seen at meets where they’re both in attendance.

Jimbo
7 years ago

First of all I don’t think shoults is a top 5 recruit! Maybe top 25 at best. Second of all I can’t see him making great progression at Stanford, I can see him adding one to five seconds per event for his freshman sophomore and junior year! And then finally going the same times as now his senior year

klorn8d
Reply to  Jimbo
7 years ago

how in the world is he not a top 5 recruit? 1:34 and 4:15 as a JUNIOR in high school are already on the edge of scoring, a rare sight for mens recruits. We never know how any kid will swim in college so predicting his gains is just random and dumb.

Yikes
Reply to  Jimbo
7 years ago

Okay, cal fangirl

CT Swim Fan
Reply to  Jimbo
7 years ago

One of the stupider comments I’ve seen here, EVER and with no reasons for the stupidity, just random predictions. With those times in Grade 11, any college in the country would be lucky to get him.

Swims
7 years ago

I thought you weren’t aloud to communicate with coaches until July first before senior year how has he talked to coaches over the last 12 months?

Admin
Reply to  Swims
7 years ago

Swims – coaches can’t call you until JUly 1. You can call coaches prior to that.

Chicago Fan
7 years ago

Connor Black?

CardFan
7 years ago

Max Williamson?

fan
7 years ago

Liam Egan?

fan2
Reply to  fan
7 years ago

Shoults is already faster than egan, who had a less than stellar performance this year, plus he adds the 200 fly giving him that versatility edge.

7 years ago

They’ve had quite a few guys walk in with some scoring/near scoring swims since Nolan arrived.

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Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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