2022 European Junior Championships: Day 3 Finals Live Recap

2022 EUROPEAN JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIPS

  • Tuesday, July 5th – Sunday, July 10th
  • Otopeni Olympic Swimming Complex, Bucharest, Romania
  • LCM (50m)
  • Start Times
    • Prelims: 10 a.m. local / 3 a.m. ET
    • Finals: 5 p.m. local / 10 a.m. ET
  • Meet Central
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  • Live Results
  • Live Stream

On day three of the 2022 European Junior Championships, there will be loads of finals and semifinals action.

The session will be headlined by stars like Lana Pudar, who is the defending champion in the girls’ 100 fly and looks to take another title tonight. However, the top seed coming into finals is Belgium’s Roos Vanotterdijk.

Other notable names competing include Romania’s David Popovici, who has already won the boys’ 200 free and will take on the 50 free semifinals, where he comes in with the fastest time from prelims at 22.46. This meet marks his first time competing in the event at a major international meet, as he did not swim the 50 at worlds.

Another big name that has already been crowned champion competing tonight is Ksawery Masiuk. He looks to back up his 50 back title with a win in the 200 back, but tonight he will have to get through semifinals first. He has the fastest time from prelims at 1:59.41, and was the only boy under two minutes. His Polish teammate, Krzysztof Chmielewski, is the top seed in the boys’ 1500 free final at 15:12.31. He also won 200 fly gold earlier in the meet.

Other races from this session include the girls’ 200 back, 200 breast, and 50 free semifinals, the boys’ 200 back, 200 breast, and 100 fly semifinals, the boys’ 200 IM finals, and the girls’ 4×200 free relay.

GIRLS’ 200 BACKSTROKE — SEMIFINAL

  • World Record: 2:03.35 — Regan Smith, USA (2019)
  • European Record: 2:04.94 — Anastasia Fesikova, RUS (2009)
  • World Junior Record: 2:03.35 — Regan Smith, USA (2019)
  • European Junior Record: 2:06.62 — Target Time
  • European Junior Championship Record: 2:08.97 — Polina Egorkova, RUS (2017)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Laura Bernat (POL) — 2:10.14

Top 8:

  1. Dora Molnar, HUN — 2:11.24
  2. Laura Bernat, POL — 2:11.65
  3. Holly McGill, GBR — 2:12.67
  4. Evie Dilley, GBR — 2:12.81
  5. Estella Tonraht Nollgen, ESP — 2:13.60
  6. Sudem Denizli, TUR — 2:13.89
  7. Aissia Prisecariu, ROM — 2:14.64
  8. Valentina Giannini, ITA — 2:14.82

Defending European Champion Laura Bernat was challenged by Sudem Denizli for the first half of the first semifinal as Denizli split 1:04.26 at the 100-meter mark compared to Bernat’s 1:04.35. However, Bernat pulled away from the rest of the field in the second half to win in a time of 2:11.65. Denizli faded to third, while Holly McGill overtook her for second place.

Dora Molnar, the top seed out of prelims, dominated the second semifinal. She led from start to finish in a time of 2:11.24. it was a bit off her prelims time of 2:10.78, but it was still fast enough to win her race by a whole 1.57 seconds. Her and Bernat look to be the ones to beat come time for semifinals.

BOYS’ 200 IM – FINAL

  • World Record: 1:54.00 — Ryan Lochte, USA (2011)
  • European Record: 1:55.18 — Laszlo Cseh, HUN (2009)
  • World Junior Record: 1:56.99 — Hubert Kos, HUN (2021)
  • European Junior Record: 1:56.99 — Hubert Kos, HUN (2021)
  • European Junior Championship Record: 1:59.17 — Tom Dean, GBR (2019)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Berke Saka (TUR) — 2:00.04

Podium:

  1. Yigit Oktar, TUR — 2:00.68
  2. Simone Spediacci, ITA — 2:02.65
  3. Michal Piela, POL — 2:02.77

Unlike the semifinals, when Yigit Oktar was in a tight battle with George Smith and Danil Pancerevas, he absolutely dominated the 200 IM come time for finals. He won by 1.97 seconds in a time of 2:00.68, which is just over half a second off Berke Baka’s Turkish record of 2:00.04. His time was also just 0.07 seconds off his own personal best of 2:00.61.

Oktar split 26.25/30.42/35.48/28.53 in his race, having the fastest leg of the field in all four strokes. Simone Spediacci took second in a time of 2:02.65, and Michal Piela, who was fifth for the first 150 meters of the race, came home in 28.91 (the only other sub-29 split aside from Oktar) to take third.

GIRLS’ 50 FREESTYLE – FINAL

  • World Record: 23.67 — Sarah Sjostrom, SWE (2017)
  • European Record: 23.67 — Sarah Sjostrom, SWE (2017)
  • World Junior Record: 24.17 — Claire Curzan, USA (2021)
  • European Junior Record: 24.87 — Daria Tatarnikova, RUS (2021)
  • European Junior Championship Record: 24.87 — Daria Tatarnikova, RUS (2021)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Daria Tatarnikova (RUS) — 24.87

Podium:

  1. Nina Jazy, GER — 25.22
  2. Bianca Costea, ROU — 25.34
  3. Sara Curtis, ITA — 25.39

Nina Jazy, who swam the fastest time in the semifinals, backed it up with a finals win. Her time of 25.22 was a new personal best, taking 0.07 seconds off the 25.27 time she clocked in semis. Bianca Costea swam a time of 25.34 for silver, which ties her personal best from 2019 and is 0.06 away from the Romanian national record held by Tamara Costache.

Bronze medalist Sara Curtis also went a best time, improving upon the 25.67 she swam in April 2022.

BOYS’ 50 FREESTYLE – SEMIFINAL

  • World Record: 20.91 — Cesar Cielo, BRA (2009)
  • European Record: 20.94 — Fred Bosquet, FRA (2009)
  • World Junior Record: 21.75 — Michael Andrew, USA (2017)
  • European Junior Record: 21.83  — Artem Selin, GER (2019)
  • European Junior Championship Record: 21.83  — Artem Selin, GER (2019)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: David Popovici, ROU — 22.22

Top 8:

  1. David Popovici, ROU — 22.17
  2. Alexander Painter, GBR — 22.61
  3. Nans Mazellier, FRA — 22.66
  4. Jere Hribar, CRO — 22.70
  5. Szymon Misiak, POL — 22.84
  6. Martin Kartavi, ISR — 22.85
  7. Mottea Robba, FRA — 22.91
  8. Bjoren Laskerud, NOR/Elia Codardini, ITA — 22.93

Defending European Junior Champion David Popovici had a substantial lead over the rest of the field in the first semifinals, winning by 0.49 seconds. He swam a new best time of 22.17, which is faster than the 22.22 that he clocked to win European Juniors last year. The Romanian record in the event is a 21.98 set by three-time Olympian Norbert Trandafir.

The second semifinal was much closer, with Alexander Painter winning with a time of 22.61 and Jere Hiribar finishing 0.09 seconds behind for second.

Bjoren Laskerud and Elia Codardini tied for eighth in semis with a time of 22.93, so there will be a swim-off between the two later in the session.

GIRLS’ 200 BREASTSTROKE — SEMIFINAL

  • World Record: 2:18.95 — Tatiana Shoenmaker, RSA (2021)
  • European Record: 2:19.11 — Rikke Moeller Pedersen, DEN (2013)
  • World Junior Record: 2:19.64 — Vikotria Gunes, TUR (2015)
  • European Junior Record: 2:19.64  — Vikotria Gunes, TUR (2015)
  • European Junior Championship Record: 2:21.07 — Evgeniia Chikunova, RUS (2019)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Justine Delmas, FRA — 2:25.54

Top 8:

  1. Justine Delmas, FRA — 2:27.00
  2. Sienna Robinson, GBR — 2:27.52
  3. Defne Coskun, TUR — 2:27.56
  4. Eneli Jefimova, EST — 2:28.44
  5. Kamila Isayeva, UKR — 2:29.65
  6. Emma Carrasco, ESP — 2:29.75
  7. Martina Bukvic, SRB — 2:31.03
  8. Charlotte Bianchi, GBR — 2;31.04

After going 2:29.55 in prelims, Defne Coskun had a statement semifinals swim, clocking a 2:27.56 to win semifinal one by 2.19 seconds. The time was a near personal best for her, just over two tenths off the 2:27.33 she set in March 2022. Emma Carrasco, who led Coskun at the 50 meter mark, finished second with a time of 2;29.75.

In the second semifinal, defending champion Justine Delmas and Sienna Robinson were engaged in a tight battle, and Robinson had the narrow lead for the first 150 meters of the race. Delmas pulled ahead in the closing stages to win in 2:27.00, and Robinson was second with a time of 2:27.52. 50 breast champion Eneli Jefimova had the fastest last 50 of the field, coming home in 37.28 to take third in this semifinal.

BOYS’ 200 BREASTSTROKE — SEMIFINAL

  • World Record: 2:05.95 — Zac Stubblety-Cook, AUS (2022)
  • European Record: 2:06.12 — Anton Chupkov, RUS (2019)
  • World Junior Record: 2:09.39 — Qin Haiyang, CHN 2017)
  • European Junior Record: 2:09.64 — Target Time
  • European Junior Championship Record: 2:10.69 — Anton Cupkov, RUS (2015)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Aleksas Savickas (LIT) — 2:13.35

Top 8:

  1. Lucien Vergnes, FRA — 2:13.36
  2. Geroge Smith, GBR — 2:14.86
  3. Luka Mladenovic, AUT — 2:14.87
  4. David Kzymenko, UKR — 2:14.96
  5. Luca Jassen, NED — 2:15.70
  6. Steijn Louter, NED — 2:15.79
  7. Harvey Freeman, GBR — 2:16.10
  8. Ralf Roose, EST — 2;16.25

In the first semifinal of the boys’ 200 breast, Dutch teammates Luca Janssen and Steijn Louter finished just 0.09 seconds apart with times of 2:15.70 and 2:15.79 respectively. They were in first and second position for the majority of the race.

Lucien Vergnes pulled away from the rest of the field in the second semifinal, clocking a time of 2:13.36 to swim the fastest time in the semis. George Smith, who is just coming off of a finals swim in the 200 IM, took second in 2:14.86 while Luka Mladenovic was third just 0.01 seconds behind.

BOYS’ 200 BACKSTROKE — SEMIFINAL

  • World Record: 1:51.92 — Aaron Peirsol, USA (2009)
  • European Record: 1:53.23 — Evgeny Rylov, RUS (2021)
  • World Junior Record: 1:55.14 — Kliment Kolesnikov, RUS (2017)
  • European Junior Record: 2:09.64 — 1:55.14 — Kliment Kolesnikov, RUS (2017)
  • European Junior Championship Record: 1:55.83 — Kliment Kolesnikov, RUS (2018)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Ksawery Masiuk (POL) — 1:58.41

Top 8:

  1. Oleksandr Zheltykaov, UKR — 1:58.30
  2. Ksawery Masiuk, POL — 1:58.47
  3. Apostolos Siskos, GRE — 1:59.18
  4. Filip Kosinski, POL — 1:59.35
  5. Simon Clusman, FRA — 1;59.39
  6. Alexandre Desangles, FRA — 1:59.46
  7. Alex Kovats, HUN — 2:00.06
  8. Levente Balogh, HUn — 2:00.35

Unlike the prelims, where only one boy was under the two-minute threshold, the first semifinals race already has two. There was a tight race between Apostolos Siskos and Simon Clusman, who touched 1-2 in times of 1:59.18 and 1:59.39 respectively. it was actually Clusman who had the lead for the majority of the race, before Siskos took over in the final 50 meters.

Defending champion Ksawery Masiuk came in as the favorite to win the second semifinal, but it was Oleksandr Zheltyakov who took the win in a time of 1:58.30—faster than what it took to win in finals lat year. Masiuk swam a 1:58.47 to finish second and secure a spot in the finals

GIRLS’ 100 BUTTERFLY – FINAL

  • World Record: 55.48 — Sarah Sjostrom, SWE (2016)
  • European Record: 55.48 — Sarah Sjostrom, SWE (2016)
  • World Junior Record: 56.43 — Claire Curzan, USA (2021)
  • European Junior Record: 56.46 — Target Time
  • European Junior Championship Record: 57.39 — Anastasiya Shkurdai, BYS (2019)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Lana Pudar (BSH) — 57.56

Podium:

  1. Roos Vanotterdijk, BEL — 57.85
  2. Lana Pudar, BSH — 57.88
  3. Julia Ulmann, SUI — 59.39

In a major upset, 17-year-old Roos Vanotterdijk took a substantial amount off her previous best time of 58.30 to win in a new Belgian record time of 57.85. The old Belgian record of 57.91 was set by Kimblerly Buys at the 2016 Olympic Games. She beat out Lana Pudar, who was the defending European Junior Champion in the event and the heavy favorite to win.

Pudar was leading at the 50 meter mark, splitting 27.02 compared to Vanotterdijk’s 27.69. However, Vanotterdijk closed in 30.16 compared to Pudar’s 30.86 back half. Pudar had a good swim for silver though, clocking a time of 57.88 just half a second off her Bosnian record time of 57.37.

Both Pudar and Vanotterdijk were well ahead of bronze medalist Julia Ullmann, who swam nearly two seconds slower in a new best time of 59.39.

BOYS’ 100 BUTTERFLY – SEMIFINAL

  • World Record: 49.45 — Caeleb Dressel, USA (2021)
  • European Record: 49.68 — Kristof Milak, HUN (2021)
  • World Junior Record: 50.62 — Kristof Milak, HUN (2017)
  • European Junior Record: 50.62 — Kristof Milak, HUN (2017)
  • European Junior Championship Record: 51.35 — Egor Kimov, RUS (2017)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Josef Mialdinov — 52.00

Top 8:

  1. Ethan Dumesnil, FRA — 53.30
  2. Yohan Airaud, FRA — 53.34
  3. Daniel Gracik, CZE — 53.36
  4. Michal Chmielewski, POL — 53.54
  5. Casper Puggaard, DEN — 53.76
  6. Tobias Kern, CZE — 53.89
  7. Daniel Krichevsky, ISR — 53.92
  8. Ramil Valizada, AZE — 54.11

Frenchmen Ethan Dumesnil and Yohan Airaud finished just 0.04 seconds apart with times of 53.30 and 53.34 respectively in the first semifinals, and will be the top two seeds headed into the finals. In the second semifinals, it was Daniel Gracik who took the win in 53.36, while 200 fly silver medalist Michal Chmielewski was second with a time of 53.54.

BOYS’ 1500 FREESTYLE — FINAL

  • World Record: 14:31.02 – Sun Yang, CHN (2012)
  • European Record: 14:32.80 — Gregorio Paltrinieri, ITA (2022)
  • World Junior Record: 14:46.09 — Franko Grgic, CRO (2019)
  • European Junior Record: 14:46.09 — Franko Grgic, CRO (2019)
  • European Junior Championship Record: 15:01.59 — Krill Martynychev, RUS (2019)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Mert Kilavuz (TUR) —15:02.22

Podium:

  1. Vlad-Stefan Stancu, ROM — 15:05.47
  2. Krzysztof Chmielewski, POL — 15:13.36
  3. Emir Batur Albayrak, TUR — 15:15.24

Vlad-Stefan Stancu and Krzysztof Chmielewski were engaged in an extremely close race for 1350 meters, being separated by just a few hundred-seconds for the majority of their swim. However, Stancu turned on the jets in the final portion of his race, splitting a massive 27.80 on his third-to-last 50 (the only sub-29 non first 50 split of the field) to charge home in a Romanian record time of 15:05.47, taking gold in his home country. He takes down Dragos Coman‘s 18 year old record of 15:06.33 from 2004.

Stancu’s time was a massive personal best, taking almost 15 seconds off his old mark of 15:20.87 from last year.

Chmielewski, the 200 fly champion, ended up finishing 7.99 seconds behind Stancu in a time of 15:13.46, a bit off his prelims time of 15:12.31.

GIRLS’ 4×200 FREESTYLE RELAY — FINAL

  • World Record: China — 7:40.33 (2021)
  • European Record: Great Britain — 7;45.51 (2009)
  • World Junior Record: Canada — 7:51.47 (2017)
  • European Junior Record: Russia — 7:57.33 (2017)
  • European Junior Championship Record: Hungary — 7:58.99 (2017)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: Hungary — 8:00.95

Podium:

  1. Hungary — 7:59.04
  2. Italy — 8:08.93
  3. Great Britain — 8:13.42

Hungary had control over this race from the very beginning, with their lead widening more and more after each leg. Lilla Abraham got things started with a 1:59.42 leadoff, and she had the only sub-two minute flat start leg. Dora Molnar and Lili Gyurinovics split 2:00.55 and 2:01.78 respectively, before 200 free champion Nikoletta Padar anchored with a massive split of 1:57.29—faster than what she went on this relay at World Championships. Not a single other swimmer in the field split faster than two minutes.

These four girls ended up combining for a time of 7:59.04, which won by 9.89 seconds and is just 0.05 seconds off of the European Junior Championships record set by Hungary in 2017.

Hungary also won the mixed 4×100 free relay, which Padar and Molnar were on, earlier in this meet.

BOYS’ 50 FREESTYLE – SWIM-OFF

  • World Record: 20.91 — Cesar Cielo, BRA (2009)
  • European Record: 20.94 — Fred Bosquet, FRA (2009)
  • World Junior Record: 21.75 — Michael Andrew, USA (2017)
  • European Junior Record: 21.83  — Artem Selin, GER (2019)
  • European Junior Championship Record: 21.83  — Artem Selin, GER (2019)
  • 2021 European Junior Champion: David Popovici, ROU — 22.22

Top 2:

  1. Bjoren Grytnes, NOR — 22.89
  2. Elia Cordarini, ITA — 22.98

Bjoren Grytnes won the swim-off between him and Elia Cordarini, and will qualify for the finals. Cordarini is now the first reserve. Grytnes’s time of 22.89 was 0.04 seconds faster than the 22.93 he swam in the official semifinals, while Cordarini was 0.05 seconds slower.

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Jamesjabc
6 months ago

The girls 100 fly gold and silver both would have finalled at Worlds… Not a bad effort!

Troyy
Reply to  Jamesjabc
6 months ago

Pudar did final there.

CasualSwimmer
6 months ago

Wow I’m impressed by the number of french kids finaling, Paris 2024 really might be amazing

dddddddd
6 months ago

did the 1500 winner miscount his laps or something lmao

NB1
6 months ago

Not to beat on Hungary more but
amid massive government funding for Olympic sports
– not a lot of medals at the Worlds’ because they are in a generation switch (old is too old, young is too young, nothing in between)
– which would mean they should be raining medals at the Juniors’?
– or is it the 10 year olds that they are focusing on for 2028?

Last edited 6 months ago by NB1
RC17
Reply to  NB1
6 months ago

I wouldnt call Milak ‘nothing’

NB1
Reply to  RC17
6 months ago

I agree a 100%. He is in his own category, and a product of the great Hungarian traditions.
I want them to have more Cseh and Kapas quality swimmers, podiums, European Champs, etc. The talents are there, it’s about timing, how many swimmers swam their PBs at the Worlds?

NathenDrake
Reply to  NB1
6 months ago

I still have ptsd from it…
No words can discribe it.
Only Milak in 200 butterfly, Nándor is 100 free. And 4×200 free man relay has NRs.
On the women side there were only two, counting every events.
And those 2 were Senánszky and Gyurinovics, with marginal improvement.

On the men side Kovács Benedek had a new PB as well and Szebi (Szabó Szebasztián), in the 50 free.

And Marton Richard as the lead-off men in the 4×200 free, IN THE MORNING.

Last edited 6 months ago by NathenDrake
NathenDrake
Reply to  NB1
6 months ago

On the man side the youth are terrible, but having 3 girls, under 2 minutes is quite an acheivment. Pádár and Molnár are on rise, with a very girly bodytype. They have a talented 14 years old 400 medley swimmer. The women side had a good depth. On the men side the 1999-2000 generation had a brutal depth with Milák and Nándi. And quite a depth as well with Holló or Márton. Sadly Kalmár is on just getting worse.

Kós has great talent in 200 medley and 100 butterfly (which he rarely swims), even in backstroke.

And Zombori is born 2002, he can be a good member for the 4×200 relay as well.

NB1
Reply to  NathenDrake
6 months ago

and where are the breaststrokers, Gyurtas and Kovacs Agis?

NathenDrake
Reply to  NB1
6 months ago

NOWHERE.
Its more then impossible no to find someone in 20 years for the men and 26 for the women side.
Gyurta had some amazing times by 2002. While Kovács Agi won her first international medal in 1996…

nuotofan
6 months ago

Stancu had a lot in the tank with 200m to go. He set a massive PB but no doubt he could dip well below 15′.
Promising swimmer indeed.

NathenDrake
6 months ago

What a f.ckrd up line-up is this for Hungary.
And getting lane 1 as a defendig champs. NONSESNE

The line-up should have been Pádár, Gyurinovics, Ábrahám and Molnár.

Last edited 6 months ago by NathenDrake
NathenDrake
Reply to  NathenDrake
6 months ago

Still had an insane time for juniors, with 3 girls just 16.
They would have medalled with this in the last 2 Junior World Champ, finishing third both time.

Hopefully the can grabe a medal there as well.

choosy
Reply to  NathenDrake
6 months ago

It didn’t really matter in this case, they were better than the others, Dóra and Niki have to stay “tuned” for their individual events

NathenDrake
Reply to  choosy
6 months ago

Yes 100 free tomorrow, but at Worlds she hae to focus only on the 200 free and two women free relays.

choosy
Reply to  NathenDrake
6 months ago

Dóra has the 200 back final tomorrow with a big chance for gold, and hopefully she will have a nice race with Moluh in the 100 back on Sunday

NathenDrake
Reply to  choosy
6 months ago

Hopefully, but she has a shoot at the 100 free as well, where Pádár is the main favourite.

But at the Junior World, they have concenrete on 200 back ans 200 free. And the 2 relays.

NathenDrake
6 months ago

The hungarian youth swimmers on the men side are beyond terrible.

NB1
6 months ago

why not list all 8 finishers in the final?

Joel
Reply to  NB1
6 months ago

Agree

About Yanyan Li

Yanyan Li

Although Yanyan wasn't the greatest competitive swimmer, she learned more about the sport of swimming through scoring countless dual meets, being a timer, and keeping track of her teammates' best times for three years as a team manager. She eventually ventured into the realm of writing and joined SwimSwam in …

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