Watch Santiago Grassi Lower Argentine National Record in 100 Fly to 51.88

2019 SE RICHARD QUICK INVITATIONAL

  • Friday-Sunday, June 21-23
  • James E. Martin Aquatics Center, Auburn, AL
  • Long Course Meters
  • Results available on Meet Mobile: “2019 SE Richard Quick Invitational”

Argentina’s Santiago Grassi lowered his own Argentine National Record in the 100 meter butterfly Sunday evening at the 2019 SE Richard Quick Invitational, hosted by Auburn University.

Grassi, who represents Auburn University in the NCAA, lowered his own 100 meter butterfly record to a 51.88. Grassi’s previous record of 52.04 was set at the 2018 Georgia Bulldog Grand Slam in a time trial. Grassi’s splits show that though he was slightly slower at 50 meters, but that his back-end speed was considerably sharper Sunday:

Grassi 2018 Grassi 2019
1st 50 24.32 24.48
2nd 50 27.72 27.40
FINAL TIME 52.04 51.88

Grassi also won the men’s 50 butterfly in 24.06, just ahead of Erik Risolvato who touched 2nd in 24.08. Grassi also placed 3rd in the 200 fly in 2:02.74, and 3rd in the 100 freestyle in 51.12. Grassi also holds the Argentine national record in the 50 fly at 23.65, set earlier this month at the Mare Nostrum in Canet, France.

See video of Grassi’s record swim below. Video captured by Andrew Beggs.

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Marsh

Puts into perspective just how fast Dressel is. He would have most nations record with his latest 100 fly swim.

Not to discredit Grassi in any way, always nice to see more barriers get broken regardless of who it’s for.

Luigi

I was just going to say, let’s not make light of a 51.8 swim only because we know there is a 50.3 guy out there.

DMacNCheez

I mean, yeah. But 50.36 is faster than the national record for every country except USA and Serbia. 50.3 doesn’t need any perspective, it’s just silly fast.

About Reid Carlson

Reid Carlson

Reid Carlson originally hails from Clay Center, Kansas, where he began swimming at age six.  At age 14 he began swimming club year-round and later with his high school team, making state all four years.  He was fortunate enough to draw the attention of Kalamazoo College where he went on to …

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