2016 U.S. Olympic Trials Fun Facts

Now that Trials are over, we can comb over the results in detail. Thanks to Barry Revzin who sent us the analysis of swimmers making trials cuts and getting second swims from non circle seeded heats.

  • 882 men swam 1478 entries (1.7 per swimmer). 801 women swam 1556 entries (1.9 per swimmer). This was down from 1709 women’s swims and 1641 men’s swims in 2012.
  • Not counting time trials or DQ’s, swimmers completed 3567 races.
  • The most events anyone did was 6. There were 4 women: Kenisha Liu, Megan Moroney, Becca Postoll, and Leah Stevens. No men did 6 events, but 5 men did 5 events: Ryan Lochte, Sean Grieshop, Cole Buese, Michael Andrew, and Kyle Whitaker.
  • The most finals anyone swam in was 4 by Katie Ledecky and Gunnar Bentz.
  • The most semifinals anyone swam in was 4 by Michael Andrew, Missy Franklin, and Melanie Margalis.
  • In 8 events the only people who made it back were from the circle seeded heats: the women’s 100 breast, 200 fly, 400 free, 400 IM, and 800 free, and the men’s 100 free, 400 free and 400 IM.
  • The highest seed to make it back was Brandon Fiala at 123rd in the 100 breast.
  • Dani Barbiea moved up the most places from seed (not counting scratches) of anyone in the meet. She improved 135 places in the 50 free, going from 173rd to 38th. The men’s top mover was Mark McGlaughlin who moved up 123 places in the 100 back, going from 149th to 26th.
  • 275 of the 1556 women’s entries were faster than seed (18%). In 2012 19% of women’s entries dropped time from their seed.
  • 756 of women’s entries were faster than the trials cut (49%)
  • 363 of the 1478 men’s entries were faster than seed (25%). In 2012 32% of men’s entries dropped time from their seed. This year the highest rate in a single event was 31% in the 100 breast.
  • 810 of the men’s entries were faster than the trials cut (55%)
  • There were no events where 2/3’s of swimmers made a trials cut.

Here’s the event by event breakdown of swimmers who made trials cuts in their trials swims and dropped time:

Women:

Event Cut Entrants Made Cut % Beat Seed %
Total   1556 756 49% 275 18%
50 Free 26.19 178 69 39% 24 13%
100 Free 56.49 100 47 47% 18 18%
200 Free 2:02.39 105 51 49% 20 19%
400 Free 4:17.99 101 56 55% 18 18%
800 Free 8:49.99 80 34 43% 9 11%
100 Back 1:03.39 155 77 50% 34 22%
200 Back 2:16.59 133 63 47% 25 19%
100 Breast 1:11.49 123 66 54% 26 21%
200 Breast 2:34.99 123 70 57% 23 19%
100 Fly 1:01.19 134 77 57% 30 22%
200 Fly 2:14.99 95 34 36% 9 9%
200 IM 2:18.69 110 57 52% 20 18%
400 IM 4:54.99 119 55 46% 19 16%

Men:

Event Cut Entrants Made Cut % Beat Seed %
Total   1478 810 55% 363 25%
50 Free 23.29 165 85 52% 32 19%
100 Free 50.69 88 57 65% 26 30%
200 Free 1:51.89 105 65 62% 24 23%
400 Free 3:58.69 103 49 48% 21 20%
1500 Free 15:49.99 97 58 60% 21 22%
100 Back 57.19 183 101 55% 54 30%
200 Back 2:03.79 109 57 52% 27 25%
100 Breast 1:03.69 135 85 63% 42 31%
200 Breast 2:18.39 98 45 46% 18 18%
100 Fly 54.79 133 72 54% 36 27%
200 Fly 2:01.99 81 48 59% 20 25%
200 IM 2:05.09 89 49 55% 23 26%
400 IM 4:27.49 92 39 42% 19 21%
  • The smallest spread between 1st and 8th in a final was the 100 breast for the men (2.4%) and the 100 free for women (1.5%). The largest spreads came in the women’s 800 free (5.3%) and the men’s 200 breast (6.1%).

Here’s the full list of 1st vs 8th place in finals:

Women:

  1st 8th Spread
50 Free 24.28 25.13 3.5%
100 Free 53.28 54.06 1.5%
200 Free 1:54.88 1:58.6 3.2%
400 Free 3:58.98 4:09.72 4.5%
800 Free 8:10.32 8:36.09 5.3%
100 Back 59.02 1:00.48 2.5%
200 Back 2:06.9 2:11.41 3.6%
100 Breast 1:05.2 1:08.19 4.6%
200 Breast 2:24.08 2:28.12 2.8%
100 Fly 56.48 59.31 5.0%
200 Fly 2:06.8 2:11.88 4.0%
200 IM 2:09.54 2:14.16 3.6%
400 IM 4:33.73 4:46.58 4.7%

Men:

  1st 8th Spread
50 Free 21.51 22.4 4.1%
100 Free 47.72 49.13 3.0%
200 Free 1:45.66 1:49.5 3.6%
400 Free 1:45.66 1:49.5 3.6%
1500 Free 14:47.61 15:30.79 4.9%
100 Back 52.26 54.72 4.7%
200 Back 1:53.95 1:58.69 4.2%
100 Breast 59.18 1:00.61 2.4%
200 Breast 2:07.17 2:14.88 6.1%
100 Fly 51 53.56 5.0%
200 Fly 1:54.84 1:58.34 3.0%
200 IM 1:45.66 1:49.5 3.6%
400 IM 4:09.54 4:22.81 5.3%

In This Story

Leave a Reply

32 Comments on "2016 U.S. Olympic Trials Fun Facts"

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted

How many meters swum by all swimmers at these olympic trials? 😉

I don’t know about anyone else, but I’d love to see what universities/clubs are represented on the Olympic team! Maybe a tally to see which one had the most swimmers?

John Nap – we mapped out the team based on which club/university they train with earlier this week. Check it out here!

https://swimswam.com/interactive-maps-2016-u-s-olympic-team-training-base-hometown/

Missed this! Thank you for the link!

Swimmers ear
Cheater, in case you haven’t been around in the past several years, the breaststroke has evolved. Your claim works on the presumption that not only don’t the coaching staff at the University of Tennessee doesn’t know what they’re doing but the experienced officials at the Olympic Trials do not either. Look at the underwater race footage. I’m certain race officials have looked at it too. MHannis’ stroke and kick are clean, much like the other finalists. In fact Hannis’ breaststroke is cutting edge and I’d be willing to bet that her new coach – David Marsh would agree. It’s one thing to be ignorant and it’s another thing to put your ill-informed, ignorant thoughts on display for all to see… Read more »
Swimgeekgirl

Wrong place?

The Truth Hurts

You’re completely off topic from the article, but since you mentioned it… You’re also wrong. The downward butterfly kick between breastroke kicks is completely illegal. Check out her 200 splits and you can see when she turns it on and off. The last 50 at trials is a good place to start. Her delayed reaction after making the Olympic team speaks volumes to the fact that she knows exactly what she is doing. BTW, the officials at trials know to keep their hand down during the prime heats if they ever want to get invited back to a major competition.

I’m not going to comment on Molly Hannis’s technique but it’s absolutely ridiculous to imply that her delayed reaction (which I didn’t even notice) was because she assumed she would be DQed. She was likely in shock because she had just made the Olympic Team for the first time and fulfilled a lifelong dream.

wpDiscuz