Michael Andrew Offers Play-by-Play of Dominant 200 IM in San Antonio (Video)

2021 PRO SWIM SERIES – SAN ANTONIO (MARCH)

Reported by Nick Pecoraro.

MEN’S 200 INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY – FINALS

  • World Record: 1:54.00 – Ryan Lochte (2011)
  • American Record: 1:54.00 – Ryan Lochte (2011)
  • U.S. Open Record: 1:54.56 – Ryan Lochte (2009)
  • Jr. World Record: 1:57.06 – Qin Haiyang (2017)
  • Pro Swim Series Record: 1:56.32 – Michael Phelps (2012)
  1. Michael Andrew (Race Pace), 1:58.05
  2. Abrahm DeVine (Team Elite), 1:59.65
  3. Andrew Seliskar (Cal Aquatics), 2:00.59

Michael Andrew was out fast in comparison to the rest of the field, opening the first 100 fly/back in a 54.75. Andrew continued to stay ahead with a solid 33.29 breast effort, building a lead no one could catch. Andrew took the top time in the event at 1:58.05, which now takes over as the top time in the nation this season. Andrew’s time also moves up to 8th in the world this 2020-2021 season.

Taking over Andrew Seliskar for second place was Abrahm DeVine, breaking 2 minutes at 1:59.65 to rank 3rd in the nation this season. Sitting in second in the nation is Florida’s Kieran Smith (1:59.38) from January. Seliskar settled for third at 2:00.59, which ranks 6th in the nation.

Winning the B-final was Dynamo’s Raunak Khosla at 2:03.06.

2020-2021 LCM MEN 200 IM

WANGCHN
SHUN

10/01
1:56.27
2 MITCH
LARKIN
AUS 1:56.32 12/15
3 PHILLIP
HEINTZ
GER 1:56.42 12/30
4 KOSUKE
HAGINO
JPN 1:57.67 12/05
5 JEREMY
DESPLANCHES
SUI 1:57.76 12/13
6 KEITA
SUNAMA
JPN 1:57.98 12/05
7 ILYA
BORODIN
RUS 1:58.00 10/26
8 MICHAEL
ANDREW
USA 1:58.05 03/06
9 HUBERT
KOS
HUN 1:58.31 12/09
10 ANDREY
ZHILKIN
RUS 1:58.62 10/04

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PhillyMark
1 month ago

Pretty honest assessment

Swim fan
1 month ago

Very self aware and eager to improve. Not sure how you can hate on this man.

Team Joe-Mentia
1 month ago

Lots of maturity for 21!

Several times, he mentioned “we” have a lot to work to do in the coming months. Who is the “we”? Has he changed his training regimen (coaches and/or type), or still doing USRPT?

Last edited 1 month ago by Team Joe-Mentia
Grant Drukker
Reply to  Team Joe-Mentia
1 month ago

Him and dad/coach.

Hswimmer
Reply to  Team Joe-Mentia
1 month ago

I think we all know he doesn’t train more than 50s lol

Admin
Reply to  Team Joe-Mentia
1 month ago

This has been a way that Michael has described his partnership with his father, who is also his coach, for as long as I can remember, with the word “we.”

Not totally uncommon in elite sports.

PVSFree
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 month ago

Plenty of swimmers do it too, I was watching an interview with Annie Lazor from last weekend where she said something like “yeah, we’re nursing an injury.” Figures it just signals that the swimmer isn’t the only one doing hard work, there are coaches, strength coaches, massage therapists, physical therapists, etc that all make what the swimmers do possible

Comments are Closed
Reply to  Team Joe-Mentia
1 month ago

It’s the royal we.

About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

Coleman started his journey in the water at age 1, and although he actually has no memory of that, something must have stuck. A Missouri native, he joined the Columbia Swim Club at age 9, where he is still remembered for his stylish dragon swim trunks. After giving up on …

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