Men’s 4×200 Free Relay Finals Lineups: No Chalmers On Australian Team

2022 FINA WORLD AQUATICS CHAMPIONSHIPS

The men’s 4×200 free relay lineups have been released, and many notable decisions have been made by the nations participating.

The Australians, who qualified for the finals of this relay by just 0.2 seconds, are bringing back three out of their four prelims members, swapping out Brendon Smith for Elijah Winnington as the leadoff. They will not be putting Kyle Chalmers, a member of their bronze medal-winning Olympic relay last year, on the finals team. Chalmers previously swam in the heats of the 100 fly today, finishing 22nd, which means he didn’t qualify for semifinals and wouldn’t have any conflicting night events.

Coming in as the top seed by 2.59 seconds, the United States have opted to put their fastest two swimmers in Drew Kibler and Kieran Smith on leadoff and anchor respectively, while putting Carson Foster and Trenton Julian in between them. The Americans look to be the heavy favorites to win this relay.

Great Britain have taken out Matt Richards and put in James Guy, having Guy leading off and Tom Dean anchoring. This is an unusual position for both swimmers, as Dean led off Britain’s Olympic relay, and Guy almost never leads off in these relays and usually swims third or anchors.

The French swapped in Leon Marchand for Enzo Tesic on their finals relay. Although Marchand has been having a stellar meet, winning two individual golds and a silver, this will be his relay debut, and his first time swimming a long course 200 free this season.

Full Lineups:

  1. France (Pothain, Marchand, Fuchs, Salvan)
  2. China (Hong, Zhang, Chen, Pan)
  3. Hungary (Marton, Nemeth, Hollo, Milak)
  4. United States (Kibler, Foster, Julian, Smith)
  5. Brazil (Scheffer, Assuncao, Setin Sartori, Correia)
  6. South Korea (Hwang, Kim, Lee Y., Lee H.)
  7. Great Britain (Guy, Whittle, Litchfield, Dean)
  8. Australia (Winnington, Incerti, Short, Horton)

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Rafael
7 days ago

Italy.. why have you denied us of Bronze?

Davide clasps
7 days ago

Ffs, have British swimming not watched the last 8 years? PUT JIMMY GUY LAST

Blake pierogi
7 days ago

I wish Marchand was leading off

Jay Ryan
7 days ago

Marchand will perform on this relay. Recall that at NCAA in yards he 18.4, 40.9, and 1:29.9 swimming on ASUs relays.

thezwimmer
7 days ago

Kibler 1:45.05
Foster 1:44.78
Julian 1:45.51
Smith 1:44.47

USA gold 6:59.81

Editor
Reply to  thezwimmer
7 days ago

I’d love to see Kibler get under 1:45 on the leadoff. He was so close in the individual event.

thezwimmer
Reply to  Robert Gibbs
7 days ago

I’d love to be proven wrong

Noah
7 days ago

Kibler should’ve been anchor and Kieran the leadoff. Kieran led-off last year in a PB and Kibler was way faster in the individual.

Mike
Reply to  Noah
7 days ago

Perhaps they are giving him a chance to go 1:44 since he was very close in the final of the 200

Cate
Reply to  Noah
7 days ago

Last year

OLOAP
Reply to  Noah
7 days ago

I agree

Steve Nolan
7 days ago

CHALMERS SCURRED

Sub13
Reply to  Steve Nolan
7 days ago

I know right? Imagine being so scared of losing you fled Budapest. Oh wait was that someone else?

Fobby Binke
Reply to  Steve Nolan
7 days ago

You spelled Dressel wrong

Steve Nolan
7 days ago

Ah I wanted a Milak leadoff. Could be special.

NathenDrake
Reply to  Steve Nolan
7 days ago

Not worth it for the hungarian relay

Steve Nolan
Reply to  NathenDrake
7 days ago

It was a good relay! They instead led off with a 1:48, which did sorta doom ’em. He was a second and a half faster in the morning, would’ve had a shot at a medal if he and their third leg did what they did earlier.

NathenDrake
Reply to  Steve Nolan
7 days ago

Yes, you are totally right. Milak would have started slower then 23,20 and finish even stronger and better time. But Dean time is just brutal. Hungary would have been 4th, I think.

About Yanyan Li

Yanyan Li

Yanyan is from Madison, New Jersey and spent the majority of her life there. Although she wasn't the greatest competitive swimmer, she learned more about the sport of swimming through scoring countless dual meets, being a timer, and keeping track of her teammates' best times for three years as a …

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