Lilly King Swims Lifetime Best in 200 Breaststroke on Friday in Indianapolis

FINA CHAMPIONS SWIM SERIES 2019 #3 – INDIANAPOLIS

While the world’s #1 swimmer in the 200 breaststroke this season, Annie Lazor, won’t swim the event at this summer’s World Championship, her training partner Lilly King is showing that Lazor’s success early this year is not a fluke – it’s a trend for the Indiana post-grad training group.

On day 1 of the FINA Champions Swim Series in Indianapolis on Friday evening, King swam a 2:21.39 in the women’s 200 breaststroke. In the process, she beat the defending World Champion and her arch-rival Yulia Efimova, who took 2nd in 2:21.59.

That’s a new lifetime best for King, who generally hasn’t been as renowned in the 200 in long course as in the 100. She entered the final 50 meters .38 seconds behind Efimova, but on the last length made up more than half-a-second to take the win. Efimova, while the defending World Champion, hasn’t been as good in the 200 this season – though this time was her new season best.

King’s previous best time in the 200 breast was a 2:21.83 done at the 2017 National Championships. Last season, she mustered a 2:22.12 at Pan Pacs, which took silver behind countrymate Micah Sumrall.

King’s half-second drop in the event jumps her 4 spots, from 16th to 12th, in the all-time rankings in the event. She’s the 3rd-best American in history, behind Rebecca Soni‘s 2012 time of 2:19.59 and Annie Lazor‘s 2:20.77 from 2 weeks ago.

Some Split Comparisons Against King’s Competitors.

1st 50 2nd 50 3rd 50 4th 50 Final Time
King’s Previous Best 2017 31.76 36.42 36.81 36.84 2:21.83
King on Friday 2019 31.66 36.38 37.11 36.24 2:21.39
Efimova on Friday 2019 33.36 35.53 35.88 36.82 2:21.59
Lazor Best Time 2019 33.08 35.79 36.03 35.87 2:20.77
Sumrall 2018 time 2018 32.44 35.73 36.88 36.83 2:21.88
Soni’s American Record 2012 32.49 35.61 35.85 35.64 2:19.59

Notice the splitting difference on Friday between King and Efimova.

King now ranks 2nd in the world, behind only Lazor, in the event, and Efimova is ranked 3rd.

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Yozhik
3 years ago

There is a reason why so many splits from different years done by different swimmers were presented in the article. I would add one more of Efimova from 2013 in Barcelona when she was 21. Not sure though if she was clean at that time: 2:19.41 (32.86 – 35.44 – 35.30 – 35.81)
Comparing King’s yesterday’s splits to any other including her own one I would say that they are looking very unusual (to put it calmly). It would be strange to suggest that there was a strategy specifically tailored for her. Nobody swims 200BR this way. I think these splits got happened spontaneously by racing Efimova and i doubt she can repeat it again. Also the combination of… Read more »

Yozhik
3 years ago

That is the time when the age slowly but surely becomes a factor.

Hey Yozhik...
Reply to  Yozhik
3 years ago

…as it does to those who offer head-tilting comments on SwimSwam

Yozhik
Reply to  Hey Yozhik...
3 years ago

I’m glad that your head is back to normal position now after this emotional comment.

SwimGeek
Reply to  Yozhik
3 years ago

Not sure if something is lost in translation here, but it’s odd timing to be talking about age being a (presumably) negative factor when Lazor (age 24) an King (age 22) seem to be swimming their absolute best ever training out of the same group. I think King is going 1:03 this summer.

Yozhik
Reply to  SwimGeek
3 years ago

See my response to CALEB.

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  SwimGeek
3 years ago

she will re-break that WR – seems at her reach ….

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  Yozhik
3 years ago

You mean a positive factor. They’re out of college and can swim pro unburdened by the demands of college and the collegiate swim schedule.

Caleb
Reply to  Yozhik
3 years ago

Are you talking about Efimova?

Yozhik
Reply to  Caleb
3 years ago

Yes

swimma2
Reply to  Yozhik
3 years ago

I was going to say the exact opposite thing: swimming is becoming older clearly because of the new, awesome professional opportunities that (the lack thereof) no longer forces 21 year olds to quit…which had incorrectly long skewed the data to make us believe swimming is a young-person sport
Edit: if you’re talking about Efimova, then say so originally….it turns out PED’s affect performance…..too bad for her, but I along with most doubt she’s ever been clean

Coach
3 years ago

Champions love to race. Well done, Lilly!

DBS
3 years ago

Lilly’s finish definitely got a fist pump + “YES” combo out of me — great to see.

Yolo
3 years ago

This has quickly become one of the deepest events in the US. 2:20, 3 2:21s, and a 2:23 is pretty nuts heading into trials

Nswim
3 years ago

Imagine the US didn’t have a finalist in this event in Rio. Looking really good heading into Tokyo

pvdh
Reply to  Nswim
3 years ago

no event in the US stays weak for long

AvidSwimFan
Reply to  pvdh
3 years ago

Except the 200 fly. Here’s hoping 🤞🏾.

Togger
Reply to  AvidSwimFan
3 years ago

Men’s 400 free hasn’t been (by US standards) great recently either, last World/Olympics medal was Jaeger’s bronze in 2013 and no-one’s looked like a gold contender since PVK. Surprising when you consider the depth of the American 200.

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Togger
3 years ago

agreed

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  AvidSwimFan
3 years ago

Women’s 200 fly, that is.

Swimfan45
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
3 years ago

I think hali has done a great job

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder/co-owner of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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