2014 Pan Pacific Championships – Day 4 Finals Live Recap

2014 Pan Pacific Championships

The biggest news of the day leading into the final session of the 2014 Pan Pacific Championships is that Kevin Cordes scratched the final of the men’s 200 breaststroke. That scratch should not effect his roster spot. He currently holds the top American Qualifying time from the US National Championships in Irvine, California.

Men’s 800 free (first heat)

Meet record: 7:44.78, Grant Hackett (AUS)
American record: 7:43.60, Michael McBroom
Australian record:7:38.65, Grant Hackett
Canadian record: 7:41.86 Ryan Cochrane
Japanese record:  7:49.65 Takeshi Matsuda
Australia All-comers record: 7:41.59, Ian Thorpe (AUS)

Canadian Ryan Cochrane won the men’s 800 freestyle with a time of 7:45.39 for the gold medal. Mack Horton of Australia finished second for the silver medal at 7:47.73, and Connor Jaeger was third with his time of 7:47.75.

Jordan Harrison finished fourth for Australia with his time of 7:48.20 and Michael McBroom was fifth at 7:52.84.

 Women’s 1500 free (first heat)

Meet record: 15:55.01, Kate Ziegler (USA)
American record: 15:34.23, Katie Ledecky
Australian record: 16:01.53, Melissa Gorman
Canadian record: 16:07.73 Brittany Reimer
Japanese record: 15:58.55 Ai Shibata
Australia All-comers record: 15:53.05 Kate Ziegler (USA)

With her fifth World Record of the summer, Katie Ledecky drops six second to improve her World Record to 15:28.36! To put that in perspective, the world record at this time last year was still 15:42, and she would have finished 18th at the US National Championships in the men’s 1500 meter freestyle.

The silver medal went to Lauren Boyle of New Zealand at 15:55.69. Brittany Maclean of Canada claimed the bronze with her time of 15:57.15. Cierra Runge finished fourth at 16:04.48.

Women’s 200 IM

Meet record: 2:09.93, Emily Seebohm (AUS)
American record: 2:06.15, Ariana Kukors
Australian record: 2:07.03 Stephanie Rice
Canadian record: 2:11.23 Erica Morningstar
Japanese record:2:10.90 Tomoyo Fukuda
Australia All-comers record: 2:08.63 Alicia Coutts

Maya DiRado picked up the Gold medal for the United States in the women’s 200 IM with her time of 2:09.93. That time tied the meet record set by Emily Seebohm. Australian Alicia Coutts finished second for the silver medal with her time of 2:10.25. Caitlin Leverenz finished third for Bronze at 2:10.67, joining her teammate DiRado on the podium.

Kanako Watababe and Roka Omoyo were fourth and fifth for Japan at 2:11.16 and 2:12.39.

Melanie Margalis of the United States won the B-final of the women’s 200 IM with her time of 2:11.42. Miho Teramura was second for Japan at 2:12.75 and Sishi Zhang from China finished third at 2:12.92.

Melanie Margalis and Maya DiRado will represent Team USA next year at the 2015 World Championships in this event.

Men’s 200 IM

Meet record: 1:54.43, Ryan Lochte (USA)
American record: 1:54.00 Ryan Lochte
Australian record: 1:56.69 Leith Brodie
Canadian record: 1:59.19 Keith Beavers
Japanese record:  1:55.38 Kosuke Hagino
Australia All-comers record: 1:54.98 Michael Phelps (USA)

Ryan Lochte missed the A-final of the men’s 200 IM this morning, but that didn’t hold him back from swimming fast tonight. He posted the fastest time in the B-final to win with a time of 1:56.02.

After watching Lochte throw down the second fastest time in the world this year, the A-finalists had to swim. At the end of the race, it was Kosuke Hagino that reached in for the Gold with the exact same time as Lochte, 1:56.02. Michael Phelps won the silver medal with his time of 1:56.04. The Bronze medal went to Daiya Seto of Japan with his time of 1:57.72.

Thiago Pererira finished fourth for Brazil at 1:57.83 and Tyler Clary was fifth with his time of 1:58.79.

Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps have the 200 IM roster spots for the 2015 World Championships team.

Women’s 50 free

Meet record: 24.63, Jessica Hardy (USA)
American record: 24.07, Dara Torres
Australian record: 23.97 Lisbeth Trickett
Canadian record: 24.75 Victoria Poon
Japanese record: 25.14 Sumika Minamoto
Australia All-comers record: 23.97 Lisbeth Trickett (AUS)

The Campbell sister do it again. Cate Campbell won the women’s 50 freestyle with her time of 23.96. That is the same time that Francesca Halsall swum at the 2014 Commonwealth Games. They are now tied for the fastest in the world this year. Cate also broke the meet, Australian, and Australian All-comers records with her swim. Bronte Campbell won the silver medal with her time of 24.56. Canada’s Chantal Van Landeghem finished in third for the bronze medal at 26.69.

Simone Manuel was fourth at 24.70, followed by Graciele Herrmann in fifth for Brazil at 24.78.

Australian Melanie Schlanger won the B-final of the women’s 50 freestyle with her time of 25.23. Madeline Locus was second for the Untied States at 25.24, and Alessandra Marchioro was third for Brazil at 25.37.

Men’s 50 free

Meet record: 21.55, Nathan Adrian (USA)
American record: 21.40, Cullen Jones
Australian record: 21.19, Ashley Callus
Canadian record: 21.73 Brent Hayden
Japanese record: 21.88 Shinri Shioura
Australia All-comers record: 21.19, Ashley Callus

Bruno Fratus of Brazil got his hand on the wall to win the 50 freestyle gold medal with his time of 21.44. That will stand as the new meet record. Anthony Ervin and Nathan Adrian finished second and third for the United States with silver and bronze medals. Ervin finished at 21.73 and Adrian was 21.80. Both Ervin and Adrian will represent the United States in this event next summer at the world championships.

Cameron McEvoy of Australia was fourth with his time of 22.07 and Shinri Shioura of Japan was fifth at 22.11.

Jimmy Feigen won the B-final of the 50 freestyle for the Untied States at 22.38. Canadian Luke Peddie was second at 22.68, and Kenta Ito from Japan finished third at 22.74.

Women’s 200 breast

Meet record: 2:20.69, Rebecca Soni (USA)
American record: 2:19.59 Rebecca Soni
Australian record: 2:20.54 Leisel Jones
Canadian record: 2:20.12 Annamay Pierse
Japanese record: 2:20.72 Satomi Suzuki
Australia All-comers record: 2:20.54 Leisel Jones

Japan’s Kanako Watanabe won the women’s 200 breaststroke with her time of 2:21.41. Her teammate, Rie Kaneto, reached in just behind her to win the silver medal at 2:21.90. Australian Taylor Mckeown finished third for the bronze medal at 2:23.32.

Kierra Smith finished fourth for Canada and Micah Lawrence was fifth with her time of 2:24.6o.

Japan’s Mio Motegi also won the B-final of the women’s 200 breaststroke. She won with a time of 2:27.20.

Men’s 200 breast

Meet record: 2:08.36 Kosuke Kitajima (JPN)
American record: 2:07.42, Eric Shanteau
Australian record: 2:07.31, Christian Sprenger
Canadian record: 2:08.84, Mike Brown
Japanese record: 2:07.01 Akihiro Yamaguchi
Australia All-comers record: 2:08.25, Ryo Tateishi (JPN)

Japan adds another Gold medal with a 2:08.57 from Yahuhiro Koseki to win the men’s 200 breaststroke. Nic Fink improved on his time from Nationals to win the silver medal with his time of 2:08.94. Japan’s Kazuki Kohinata won the bronze medal with his time of 2:10.14.

Josh Prenot of the Untied States finished fourth at 2:11.05, followed by Tales Cerdeira of Brazil at 2:11.49.

Kevin Cordes and Nic Fink will represent the United States in this event next year at the 2015 World Championships.

Naoya Tomita won the B-final of the men’s 200 breaststroke with a 2:11.45.

Women’s 4×100 medley relay

Meet record: 3:55.23 USA (Coughlin, Soni, Vollmer, Hardy) 2010
American record: 3:52.05 (Franklin, Soni, Vollmer, Schmitt) 2012
Australian record:3:52.58 (Seebohm, Katsoulis, Schipper, Trickett) 2009
Canadian record: 3:57.87 (Wilkinson, Pierse, Lacroix, Poon) 2009
Japanese record: 3:55.73 (Terakawa, Suzuki, Kato, Ueda) 2012
Australia All-comers record: 3:55.74 AUS (Seebohm, Jones, Schipper, Lenton) 2007

The Australian relay team of Emily Seebohm, Lorna Tonks, Alicia Coutts, and Cate Campbell won the women’s 4×100 medley relay with a new Australian All-comers record of 3:55.49. Cate Campbell had a big anchor split with a 51.85 to close the race.

The United States finished second at 3:57.41 and Canada was third at 3:59.85.

Men’s 4×100 medley relay

Meet record: 3:31.79 USA (Peirsol, Hansen, Crocker, Lezak) 2006
American record: 3:27.28 (Peirsol, Shanteau, Phelps, Walters) 2009
Australian record: 3:28.64 (Delaney, Rickard, Lauterstein, Targett) 2009
Canadian record: 3:31.02 (Wollach, Bois, Bartoch, Hayden) 2009
Japanese record: 3:30.74 (Irie, Tateishi, Fujii, Harada) 2009
Australia All-comers record: 3:31.91 JPN (Irie, Tateishi, Fujii, Harada) 2013

The relay team of Matt Grevers, Kevin Cordes, Michael Phelps, and Nathan Adrian won the gold medal in the men’s 4×100 medley relay for the United States with new meet and Australian All-comers records. Everyone had strong splits, but Kevin Cordes was on fire, splitting 58.64.

Japan finished second at 3:32.08 and Australia was third at 3:33.45.

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Marko

Ledecky has smashed the WR in the 1500 – 15:28!!!!

Marko

And her last 400 was 4:05.28!! Just incredible.

aswimfan

Ledecky in another galaxy 15:28.36 WR

I am speechless.

HG

She would have won the men’s 73 Worlds 400 & 1500 in Belgrade . Rick Demont ( who is here ) & Stephen Holland ( who may be here ) must be smiling .

Danjohnrob

Didn’t she just break the 400 World Record yesterday?! Doesn’t she even need any recovery time?! From now on it’s only fair that she should have the choice to swim with the guys; otherwise she might as well just swim time trials! Lauren Boyle was more than 28 seconds behind! Isn’t she the Short- Course World Record holder in THIS event?

ERVINFORTHEWIN

5 golds allready for ledecky ! what a racer …..!!!!!

About Tony Carroll

Tony Carroll

The writer formerly known as "Troy Gennaro", better known as Tony Carroll, has been working with SwimSwam since April of 2013. Tony grew up in northern Indiana and started swimming in 2003 when his dad forced him to join the local swim team. Reluctantly, he joined on the condition that …

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