2014 Pan Pacific Championships – Grevers blows away meet, all-comers records at day 1 prelims

  208 Jared Anderson | August 20th, 2014 | Africa, Asia, Australia, Brazil, Latin America & Caribbean, Canada, Featured, International, News, Previews & Recaps

2014 Pan Pacific Championships

Women’s 200 free

Meet record: 1:56.10, Allison Schmitt (USA), 2010
American record: 1:53.61, Allison Schmitt
Australian record: 1:55.68, Emma McKeon
Canadian record: 1:56.97, Genevieve Saumur
Japanese record: 1:57.37, Haruka Ueda
Australia All-comers record: 1:55.52, Laure Manaudou (FRA)

She’s the unquestioned world’s best in the distance races, but 17-year-old American Katie Ledecky continues to impress even in the 200-meter distance. She took the top seed out of prelims, winning the fourth heat with a 1:56.45. Ledecky’s still got plenty in the tank, having gone almost a second and a half faster two weeks ago at U.S. Nationals.

Australia’s Melanie Schlanger cut a tenth off her seed and is the surprise #2 seed, passing up some of her own teammates and few rival swimmers to grab lane 5 in 1:57.16. Though Schlanger was great on Australia’s world record-setting 400 free relay, she was actually left off the country’s 800 free relay in Glasgow. We’re betting that won’t be the case here at Pan Pacs.

Things really tightened up from there. Shannon Vreeland is 1:57.40 for the third seed, followed closely by teammate Missy Franklin (1:57.63) and Australia’s Bronte Barratt (1:57.65).

The entire top 10 was made up of Americans and Australians, but per Pan Pacs rules, only two swimmers per country are allowed into the A final. It’ll be Ledecky and Vreeland for the Americans (barring any coaching decisions to scratch one of the two), leaving Franklin out. Coming off of a much-publicized bout with back spasms just yesterday, Franklin had to have been affected at least a little in this race, and it’s highly unlikely she’ll take the U.S.’s B final spot. Her status in the 100 back later in this session is uncertain as well, but it might be best for Franklin not to have to worry about a double in finals.

Australia will be represented by Schlanger and Barrat, leaving Emma McKeon out, perhaps to the B final. McKeon took 6th in 1:57.87, and American Leah Smith was 1:58.20 for 7th.

Also jumping into the final with the two Americans and Australians: Canada’s Sam Cheverton (11th, 1:58.80), China’s Sishi Zhang (12th, 1:59.45), and Japan’s Chihiro Igarashi (14th, 1:59.96) and Yasuko Miyamoto (15th, 2:00.17).

Probable A-finalists:

  1. Katie Ledecky, USA – 1:56.45
  2. Melanie Schlanger, AUS – 1:57.16
  3. Shannon Vreeland, USA – 1:57.40
  4. Bronte Barrat, AUS – 1:57.65
  5. Sam Cheverton, CAN – 1:58.80
  6. Sishi Zhang, CHN – 1:59.45
  7. Chihiro Igarashi, JPN – 1:59.96
  8. Yasuko Miyamoto, JPN – 2:00.17

Men’s 200 free

Meet record: 1:44.75, Ian Thorpe (AUS), 2002
American record: 1:42.96, Michael Phelps
Australian record: 1:44.06, Ian Thorpe
Canadian record: 1:46.40, Brent Hayden
Japanese record:1:45.24, Sho Uchida
Australia All-comers record: 1:43.86, Michael Phelps (USA)

Japan’s Kosuke Hagino grabbed top billing in the men’s event, beating out American Conor Dwyer in his heat with a 1:46.60. Dwyer was close behind at 1:46.65, and the two will go into the final as the men to beat. That’s a big swim for Dwyer, who was a little off at U.S. Nationals, but really kicked it into gear on the Gold Coast.

Australia’s Thomas Fraser-Holmes is the third seed, going 1:46.95. He’ll be just ahead of 20-year-old teammate Cameron McEvoy (1:47.08). Meanwhile Dwyer’s American teammate (and former Florida training partner) Ryan Lochte took 5th, going 1:47.35.

Here’s where the triples start. David McKeon went 1:47.45 for Australia, but will be left out of the A final because he’s the third finisher from his coutnry. Reo Sakata makes the final as Japan’s #2 after going 1:47.74, but American Matt McLean will be relegated to the B final with McKeon. McLean was 1:47.91 in a three-way tie for 8th place.

He’s tied with Japan’s Yuri Kobori (sent to the B heat) and Brazil’s Nicolas Oliveira for that spot. Oliveira is the 7th man into the final, with New Zealand’s Matt Stanley joining him after finishing 12th, just ahead of U.S. youngster Reed Malone.

Probable A-Finalists:

  1. Kosuke Hagino, JPN – 1:46.60
  2. Conor Dwyer, USA – 1:46.65
  3. Thomas Fraser-Holmes, AUS – 1:46.95
  4. Cameron McEvoy, AUS – 1:47.08
  5. Ryan Lochte, USA – 1:47.35
  6. Reo Sakata, JPN – 1:47.74
  7. Nicolas Oliveira, BRA – 1:47.91
  8. Matthew Stanley, NZ – 1:48.74

Women’s 100 back

Meet record: 59.34, Emily Seebohm (AUS), 2010
American record: 58.33, Missy Franklin
Australian record: 58.23, Emily Seebohm
Canadian record: 59.68, Sinead Russell
Japanese record: 58.70, Aya Terakawa
Australia All-comers record: 58.92, Emily Seebohm (AUS)

It was a relatively slow morning in the 100 back, with just one woman under a minute and only three under 1:01. The Australians sit 1-2, perhaps justifying our own Braden Keith’s prediction of a potential upset in the 200 later on. It’s Emily Seebohm leading the way at 59.72. She’s got to be considered a co-favorite with American Missy Franklin, and Seebohm looks to be the frontrunner at this point especially swimming at home. Belinda Hocking was 1:00.46 to take the second seed, and we’ll see both Aussies in the middle of the pool in tonight’s final.

The Americans came next, with Franklin going 1:00.60, back spasms and all, to take third. She’ll certainly be more rested tonight as she’s expected to scratch the 200 free, so mark this one down as a great race to look forward to.

Her teammates Elizabeth Pelton (1:01.05) and Kathleen Baker (1:01.09) followed, and Pelton will join Franklin in the A final while Baker heads to the B.

Canada’s Dominique Bouchard joins the party, going 1:01.10 to sit just .01 back of Baker, although she’ll make the final as her country’s top finisher. American Rachel Bootsma was next (1:01.27) but won’t swim tonight. Meanwhile Hilary Caldwell takes Canada’s second finals slot, finishing 8th in 1:01.34.

Canadian Brooklynn Snodgrass is another left on the outside, but should make the B final tonight an exciting affair, provided she, Baker and Bootsma all swim it. Also joining the A final are a pair of Japanese swimmers, Miyuki Takamura and 19-year-old Sayaka Akase.

Probable A-Finalists:

  1. Emily Seebohm, AUS – 59.72
  2. Belinda Hocking, AUS – 1:00.46
  3. Missy Franklin, USA – 1:00.60
  4. Elizabeth Pelton, USA – 1:01.05
  5. Dominique Bouchard, CAN – 1:01.10
  6. Hilary Caldwell, CAN – 1:01.34
  7. Miyuki Takamura, JPN – 1:01.54
  8. Sayaka Akase, JPN – 1:01.72

Men’s 100 back

Meet record: 53.31, Aaron Peirsol (USA), 2010
American record: 51.94, Aaron Peirsol
Australian record: 52.97, Hayden Stoeckel
Canadian record: 53.63, Pascal Wollach
Japanese record: 52.24, Ryosuke Irie
Australia All-comers record: 52.98, Aaron Peirsol (USA)

American Matt Grevers has won this event at the last Olympics and the most recent World Championships, and he kept right on rolling in the preliminaries. Grevers went 52.91 to blow away the meet and All-comers records – fantasy swimming enthusiasts take note! (All-Comers is similar to US Open records – it marks the fastest swim done on Australian soil by a swimmer of any nationality).

The U.S is incredibly strong in this event, and it was the youngster Ryan Murphy who pulled through with the second seed. Murphy went 53.24 to steal lane 5 for tonight. The Americans went 1-2 at the London Olympics with Grevers and Nick Thoman, and at last summer’s Worlds with Grevers and David Plummer. Now it might be Murphy’s turn to round out the gold-silver sweep.

Japan’s Ryosuke Irie is their top threat. He went 53.29 for the third seed this morning, well off his season-best of 52.57. Australian Mitchell Larkin is fourth, going 53.49 in prelims.

American David Plummer will be the first man left out of the A final, though he’ll likely get a second swim in the B heat. Plummer was 53.82, the last man under 54 this morning.

Junya Koga finished 6th for Japan and will be the 5-seed into the final. His 54.30 just nipped Australian Ben Treffers by .04. Treffers just beat out his teammate Josh Beaver for the second A final spot. Beaver was 54.40, .06 back of Treffers.

Also into the A final: Brazil’s Thiago Pereira (9th, 54.43) and Guilhermo Guido (11th, 54.50). Just between them was American Nick Thoman in 54.44, and fellow USA representative Jacob Pebley was 54.57 for 12th.

Probable A-Finalists:

  1. Matt Grevers, USA – 52.91
  2. Ryan Murphy, USA – 53.24
  3. Ryosuke Irie, USA – 53.29
  4. Mitchell Larkin, AUS – 53.49
  5. Junya Koga, JPN – 54.30
  6. Ben Treffers, AUS – 54.34
  7. Thiago Pereira, BRA – 54.43
  8. Guilhermo Guido, BRA – 54.50

Women’s 800 free (first two heats)

Meet record: 8:16.22, Janet Evans (USA), 1989
American record: 8:11.00, Katie Ledecky
Australian record: 8:19.76, Jessica Ashwood
Canadian record: 8:20.91, Brittany MacLean
Japanese record: 8:23.68, Sachiko Yamada
Australia All-comers record: 8:18.52, Kate Zeigler (USA)

The distance events are swum as timed finals, with the slower heats swimming in the morning and the fastest heat at night.

The leaders, with the fastest heat yet to go, are three Americans. 16-year-old Becca Mann sits first right now, blasting to a lifetime-best 8:22.45 to win the second heat. About eight seconds behind her is open water star Haley Anderson at 8:30.87. Virginia Cavaliers sophomore Leah Smith sits third at 8:32.38, though with the two-per-country rule, she’s not allowed to officially score. The Americans will still have Katie Ledecky and Cierra Runge to swim at night.

Australia’s Kareena Lee is fourth at 8:39.47 before things drop off to Canada’s Tabitha Baumann at 8:46.75. New Zealand’s Emma Robinson is the last swimmer under 9 minutes, going 8:49.80.

Women’s 200 fly

Meet record: 2:05.40, Jessica Schipper (AUS), 2006
American record: 2:04.14, Mary DeScenza
Australian record: 2:03.41, Jessica Schipper
Canadian record: 2:05.95, Audrey Lacroix
Japanese record: 2:04.69, Natsumi Hoshi
Australia All-comers record: 2:05.81, Susan O’Neill (AUS)

Katie McLaughlin became the second 17-year-old Katie to take a top seed on day 1, going 2:08.02 to lead the women’s 200 fly. McLaughlin, out of California, cut seven tenths off her seed and leads a trio of American women sweeping the top three spots.

Just behind her is Cammile Adams at 2:08.22 and just a tenth back is another college star, Hali Flickinger (2:08.33). McLaughlin and Adams will swim the A final tonight with Flickinger heading the B.

Canada’s national record-holder Audrey Lacroix went 2:08.82 and will take the third seed in the final. Just behind her were a trio of Japanese entrants, including their national record-holder Natsumi Hoshi. Hoshi was 2:09.11 for 5th place, with Miyu Nakano and Sakiko Shimizu in the next two slots at 2:09.21 and 2:09.66, respectively. Nakano is into the A final and Shimizu the B.

Venezuela’s Andreina Pinto becomes her country’s first championship finalist of the 2014 meet.

American Maya DiRado is 9th. Also into the final are Canada’s Katerine Savard (10th, 2:11.77) and Australia’s Madeline Groves (12th, 2:13.24). Between them was American Caitlin Leverenz at 2:11.83.

Probable A-Finalists:

  1. Katie McLaughlin, USA – 2:08.02
  2. Cammile Adams, USA – 2:08.22
  3. Audrey Lacroix, CAN – 2:08.82
  4. Natsumi Hoshi, JPN – 2:09.11
  5. Miyu Nakano, JPN – 2:09.21
  6. Andreina Pinto, VEN – 2:10.17
  7. Katerine Savard, CAN – 2:11.77
  8. Madeline Groves, AUS – 2:13.24

Men’s 200 fly

Meet record: 1:53.80, Michael Phelps (USA), 2006
American record: 1:51.51, Michael Phelps
Australian record: 1:54.46, Nick D’Arcy
Canadian record: 1:57.01, Stefan Hirniak
Japanese record: 1:52.97, Takeshi Matsuda
Australia All-comers record: 1:52.09, Michael Phelps (USA)

Daiya Seto was the top seed coming in, and he’ll be the top seed leaving prelims as well. The 20-year-old Japanese sensation went 1:55.29 to just beat out Brazil’s Leonardo de Deus for the inside lane.

De Deus had himself a great swim, going 1:55.33 to sit just hundredths behind Seto. Two tenths back is the other Japanse finalist Masato Sakai, who went 1:55.52 and will settle into lane 3 next to Seto tonight.

Tyler Clary is the top American, going 1:55.92 with the field’s best final 50. Clary will have to be out a little faster to compete for a medal, but he clearly has the grit coming home to be a challenger. The Americans will need it, as the national champion Tom Shields was disqualified in the preliminaries and won’t swim in finals. We haven’t heard what infraction Shields was called for, but it’s a tough break for a guy who really crashed onto the world scene with his big double wins at Nationals two weeks ago. He finished here in 1:57.62, which would have put him into the A final as the 5th seed.

(Update: Shields was apparently disqualified for a one-handed touch on the second turn, at the 100-meter mark).

Japan put four into the top 8, though two will be bumped out. Kenta Hirai (1:56.42) slides to the B final while Takeshi Matsuda, the national record-holder, is out of the finals tonight after finishing just 6th overall in 1:57.02.

Chase Kalisz went 1:58.25 to take 7th in the morning. That’s almost two seconds off his seed time. Canada will be represented in the final by Mack Darragh (1:58.63), while South Africa’s Michael Meyer was 1:59.74 to grab a finals spot for his country.

With just 14 men entered and the Shields DQ, this field won’t even fill the B final. That makes for an interesting A final as well, as there’s a big dropoff to the 8th seed – Canada’s Gamal Assaad at 2:03.12.

Probable A-Finalists:

  1. Daiya Seto, JPN – 1:55.29
  2. Leonardo de Deus, BRA – 1:55.33
  3. Masato Sakai, JPN – 1:55.52
  4. Tyler Clary, USA – 1:55.92
  5. Chase Kalisz, USA – 1:58.25
  6. Mack Darragh, CAN – 1:58.63
  7. Michael Meyer, RSA – 1:58.63
  8. Gamal Assaad, CAN – 2:03.12

Men’s 1500 free (first heat)

Meet record: 14:41.65, Grant Hackett (AUS), 2002
American record: 14:45.29, Larsen Jensen
Australian record: 14:34.56, Grant Hackett
Canadian record: 14:39.63, Ryan Cochrane
Japanese record: 14:54.80, Kohei Yamamoto
Australia All-comers record: 14:44.94, Grant Hackett (AUS)

The men’s 1500 is run the same way as the women’s 800, with one early heat and the top 8 swimmers competing in finals. American Jordan Wilimovsky is the top qualifier with one heat to go, going 15:01.43 to win the opening heat. He’s followed by two teammates – Sean Ryan (15:03.82) and Andrew Gemmell (15:11.82). The U.S. will have its top two competitors in the A final with Connor Jaeger and Michael McBroom.

There were three more swimmers in that opening heat. Australia’s Jarrod Poort was 15:23.39, Japan’s Shogo Takeda 15:25.40 and Canada’s Eric Hedlin 15:32.81.

Comments

  1. Bystander says:
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    Heard that Missy will compete in the 200 free prelims then they will re-evaluate whether she’ll also do the 100 back…

  2. Katy says:
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    Is the live stream not working for anyone else or is it just me???

  3. SwimEagle says:
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    Is there a live feed anywhere?? The Swimming Australia site won’t load for me…

  4. coach says:
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    Not working for me either

  5. 2
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    this link is not working for me. Is there another link?

  6. Sarah Grady says:
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    Keep reloading, finally was able to get it working.

  7. Wonkabar23 says:
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    You know being a fan of swimming is really hard sometimes

  8. SVIRD says:
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    The stream is working for me! They aren’t announcing the lane assignments, they are simply saying ‘the lane assignments are displayed on the board’ (they don’t display the board). Are there any heat sheets?

  9. Wonkabar23 says:
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    USA swimming has heat sheets on their site under events

  10. Lane Four says:
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    I can’t get the live feed! It is not loading!

  11. SVIRD says:
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    I love how USA supporters are shouting ‘LET’S GO USA!’ before heats with US swimmers. Reminds me of how the UofM people shout ‘LET’S GO BLUE’ whenever their people swim.

  12. liquidassets says:
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    What’s the link for the live stream? Thanks.

  13. Zanna says:
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    Aussies are fast. McKeon 1.57.87, Elmsie 1.58.35

  14. Zanna says:
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    Manuel 1.58.77, Margalis 1.59.60

  15. pvdh says:
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    Well it took awhile, but the stream is up.

  16. Zanna says:
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    Ledecky goes 1.56.45 for 200 free!

  17. pvdh says:
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    Ledecky!

  18. Zanna says:
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    Vreeland 1.57.40

  19. pvdh says:
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    Franklin looking good

  20. 2
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    That was a drag trying to get in but now I can watch the races. I will never complain about the USA Swimming feed again!

  21. pvdh says:
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    aussies taking over

  22. 0
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    nice swim by Melanie S of Australia

  23. pvdh says:
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    franklin out. ledecky the huge favorite

  24. Zanna says:
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    Schlanger 1.57.16, Franklin 1.57.63, Barrat 1.57.65

  25. Wonkabar23 says:
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    Vreeland .2 ahead of Franklin for second spot

  26. pvdh says:
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    Excited to see Mcevoy and Lochte

  27. Zanna says:
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    A Finals : Ledecky, Schlanger, Vreeland, Barratt, Cheverton, Zhang, Igarashi, Miyamoto.

  28. Lane Four says:
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    Took forever but I got in. Too bad I missed Ledecky. Can’t believe Missy didn’t final!

  29. pvdh says:
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    phillips qualified for pan pacs??

  30. 2
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    nice swim by Tim Philipps to win his heat for the USA

  31. John26 says:
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    McKeon out of A final too :(

  32. 2
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    now I have this weird echo !

  33. Lane Four says:
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    How about that. The Australian live feed is just as bad as USA swimming.

  34. pvdh says:
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    good swim by Mcevoy

  35. Thanos Mihas says:
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    missed the women’s 200 free heats. looks like vreeland edged out franklin for the A final. now if vreeland can swim better than 1.56.40 in the final she would take franklin’s spot for the worlds

  36. DL says:
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    And it looks like results are not being updated on meet manager.

  37. wave rider says:
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    The lanes are backwards like they were in London. http://swimswam.com/fina-breaks-its-own-rules-at-the-london-aquatic-center/

    FR 2.8 Numbering
    “Lane number 0 shall be on the right-hand side when facing the course from the starting end with exception of 50m events, which may start from the opposite end.”

  38. pvdh says:
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    hagino over dwyer, both great times. dwyer already better than nationals

  39. Zanna says:
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    Hagino, 1.46.60, Dwyer 1.46.65

  40. NickH says:
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    Not the greatest poolside commentators, but at least I don’t have to hear, “He’s breathing to the right!” over and over again.

  41. Justin Thompson says:
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    That’s a solid prelim time for Dwyer. As fast as Yannicks final today in the 200m Free.

  42. SVIRD says:
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    Weiss with only a 1:49 mid. Doubt he’ll be on the relay.

  43. Philip Johnson says:
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    Hagino is going to be a star in Rio, mark my words

  44. Justin Thompson says:
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    Lochte killed that start!

  45. Philip Johnson says:
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    This is going to be a much better final than Euros.

  46. 1
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    Interesting to see Lochte and Fraser-Holmes swimming next to each other.

  47. Thanos Mihas says:
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    lochte beat mclean in the last heat and relegated him to B final

  48. Justin Thompson says:
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    I can’t believe Lochte shut it down like that in the last 10m. That cost him a few spots in the finals.

    • TheTroubleWithX says:
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      So, looks like Malone beats out Weiss for the 4×200 relay. Hope Malone has a little more for the relay. When was the last time a US swimmer didn’t break 1:47 in the finals of a major international competition?

      • Roger von Oech says:
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        With those times, I wouldn’t rule out that the coaches give the lead off spot to Phelps. We’ll see tomorrow!

  49. Zanna says:
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    Fraser Holmes 1.46.95, Lochte 1.47.35. Dwyer and Lochte makes finals.

  50. Lane Four says:
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    That echo is driving me crazy!!!!!!!

  51. Wahooswimfan says:
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    results also up at
    http://liveresults.swimming.org.au/sal/2014PP/

    via good old HY-TEK

  52. SpanishSwimFan says:
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    Missy missing A FINAL? Perhaps its back pain has had some influence in her performance.
    But apart from this, it’s just because of her pain or because of its training this year?

    I mean… We have already talked about the performance of Yannick Agnel under the guide of Bob Bowman but what about all Cal women that have had an underperformance season? This year we have not seen the ultra-greater Missy Franklin that used to win all its races by a big margin (100 and 200 backstroke), and where are other swimmers like Elizabeth Pelton or the Spaniard Marina García?

    I say this because last year at worlds, Marina got a 6th place in 200 breast with a time of 2.23.65 and 6th in the 100 breast with1.07.12. She is now swimming the European Champs and she’s been just 1.09 missing the final! It’s just a problem of adaptation to the USA methods or is there something else in this cases?

    • pvdh says:
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      Missy had back spasms before the race.

    • NickH says:
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      Why not give some credit to Shannon Vreeland for being one of the more consistent swimmers, and making the A-final ahead of Franklin.

      • beachmouse says:
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        Third year in a row that Vreeland has been rock solid at a big international meet. She’s the Ricky Berens of the women’s team.

    • anon says:
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      It’s a problem of being a complete STUDENT ATHLETE! You can coast in high school…but not at Cal! Even if you’re taking easy classes, you still have to have enough credits to be considered a full-time student! Freshman year is a huge adjustment for all of them…but they will all rebound. I anticipate Cierra will experience the same thing…especially when she’s coming from a home-schooling environment.

      • Klorn8d says:
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        The stanford girls didn’t have that problem this year and their classes are even tougher I bet. And no I doubt that’s why the cal girls have been off. Pelton and bootsma were great in their freshman year but had bad sophomore years this year, they didn’t have to adjust or anything. I think it’s something else

        • Cal Bear says:
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          False. Take away Maya and a post-surgery healthy Felicia Lee, and most of the Stanford girls are slower than they were in high school. Didn’t Haase, Anderson, and Brown final at Trials in high school? Wasn’t Taylor on the National Team before 2012? How many other swimmers were on the National Jr Team before college?

          They wouldn’t get into Stanford if they weren’t smart, so I won’t blame academics. “I think it’s something else.”

          • klorn8d says:
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            i don’t know about those other girls but Sarah haase is actually someone i know. she’s gone a best time in 100 breast and she semifinaled at trials not finaled. KAtie olsen had a great year in breast too

          • Cal Bear says:
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            She dropped .09 in the 100m breast from Trials (2012) to now. And the Cardinal’s only Olympian didn’t even do a best time this entire LCM season.

            Don’t call out Cal and brag about Stanford if you don’t even know half the people on the team.

          • Klorn8d says:
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            I know who those girls are but just not super famiar with their swimming but I know Sarah personally. She had a great meet at trials and it’s impressive to drop any time from that. But I was just saying I don’t think hard school is what cals problem is. I’ll steer away from stanford. The cal me go through the same system the women do. They’ve been absolute fire this year. I think there is another reason the girls are slightly underperforming. I don’t know what but the school is too hard reason just doesn’t add up.

        • anon says:
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          I never said school is too hard…more that school is more important. Remember how proud Missy was to say that she had straight As second semester? That takes time and effort to get straight As. Time that may have been taken away from swimming…NOT THAT IT’S A BAD THING!! regardless of how smart these kids are, they still need to spend time on their classes in order to do well. This happens with all college students! And athletes are certainly not the exception! Their lives are just even harder because they have even less time to balance everything. I’m not worried about Missy, or any of the other kids. They will be fine, and their swimming will be fine as well!

    • liquidassets says:
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      Another factor for Franklin is that this was the first year she didn’t train at altitude year round. And despite that, I believe her SCY times at NCAAs were all PBs or very close to it. This would have been her first complete taper since NCAAs, and she’s clearly injured. I’m not worried about her at all. Not sure about Pelton/Bootsma though.

    • calswimfan says:
      8
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      Listen, I’m just glad that Missy was able to finish the races without another case of back spasm. One can always argue about “what if’s”. What if Missy went pro? What if she went somewhere else? But what’s the point? She decided to go to Cal and she loves it there.

      It’s not fair to call her out because she didn’t A final in one event two days after having a scare. Put yourself into her shoe. She’s still young and may or may not have experienced something like this before. Just try to imagine what went through her mind after she limped out of the pool. It’s probably 100 times worse and scary than what you’re imagining.

      In her words, she’s had a great first year at college and I hate that some people just attack these athletes and the school whenever they get the chance. Missy’s case is different from Liz Pelton’s. And Liz Pelton’s case is different from Marina’s. You can’t just lump the swimmers that didn’t perform under your expectations and make a conclusion. Let’s just cheer for these girls! They still have more swimming to do! They are still young! They are determined! They seem happy! What more can you ask of them?

    • calswimfan says:
      8
      0

      Listen, I’m just glad that Missy was able to finish the races without another case of back spasm. One can always argue about “what if’s”. What if Missy went pro? What if she went somewhere else? But what’s the point? She decided to go to Cal and she loves it there.

      It’s not fair to call her out because she didn’t A final in one event two days after having a scare. Put yourself into her shoe. She’s still young and may or may not have experienced something like this before. Just try to imagine what went through her mind after she limped out of the pool. It’s probably 100 times worse and scarier than what you’re imagining.

      In her words, she’s had a great first year at college and I hate that some people just attack these athletes and the school whenever they get the chance. Missy’s case is different from Liz Pelton’s. And Liz Pelton’s case is different from Marina’s. You can’t just lump the swimmers that didn’t perform under your expectations and make a conclusion. Let’s just cheer for these girls! They still have more swimming to do! They are still young! They are determined! They seem happy! What more can you ask of them?

  53. 3
    0

    Lochte will have to be faster tonight

  54. Zanna says:
    1
    1

    Top 8 Mens 200 free : Hagino, Dwyer, Fraser-Holmes, McEvoy, Lochte, Sakata, Oliveira, Stanley.

  55. Justin Thompson says:
    1
    1

    Hagino, Dwyer, Holmes will be the order of finish in the finals, but sadly no one will be under 1:45.

  56. Justin Thompson says:
    3
    0

    Weak prelim time from Pelton. She should be under 1:00 in the prelims so it wasn’t the taper at Nats.

  57. Wonkabar23 says:
    2
    2

    Bootsma is out. Would have loved to see Baker hold off Pelton there. We could use some new blood in this race.

  58. Thanos Mihas says:
    2
    1

    franklin did not scratch 100 back

  59. Lane Four says:
    4
    0

    Missy’s start was terrible!!!!!!

  60. Justin Thompson says:
    6
    0

    Franklin spotted them a body length on the start….

  61. Philip Johnson says:
    1
    0

    Skipped?

  62. Justin Thompson says:
    10
    3

    Coughlin needs to come back to backstroke since the Americans have dropped off so much this past year.

  63. Lane Four says:
    2
    0

    I am getting worried about the USA ladies (except for Katie Ledecky). This is not a good start. They are way under-performing.

    • liquidassets says:
      3
      1

      Who is way underperforming, other than Franklin, who’s injured, and maybe Pelton/Bootsma who have been that way most of the year anyway, and still made the team?

  64. pvdh says:
    6
    9

    missy is looking…off. Maybe college wasnt the absolute best thing? Could have gotten the millions in endorsements and still attended college

    • liquidassets says:
      10
      1

      She loves Cal, had a great year there, cared more about that than the millions, and is injured today which likely explains why she looks off. It wasn’t even sure she was going to swim it until last minute.

      • Swim1 says:
        4
        4

        10 years from when NCAA swimming folded because of the O’Bannon law suit – or as I like to call it 12 years from today – we will look back and think “how stupid was this post about Missy leaving millions on the table for NCAA sports. It is unbelievable how brainwashed people are by this system. It is unforgivable – with so many people having nothing – to give up millions she could use for herself (or others) to swim for a club she could swim for anyways (just not in meets but hell she is an team AMERICA member so she does have a team to swim for!!!). She could train with CAL anyway!! I am depressed over the NCAA mindmeld…looking forward to it being over soon….

        • Swim1 says:
          2
          6

          Also…how are our colleges doing with our swimmers? Take a look at the performances – why are colleges not getting so many FAST age groupers over the top vs our old steadfast swimmers? Are coaches distracted by so many post grad programs? Idk but it looks like CAL is holding american backstroke hostage…bootsma, Pelton and Franklin (this year) have not been good…..

        • liquidassets says:
          4
          1

          So your logic is that it’s unethical for her to forego millions and to refuse to help pad the sponsors profits when others are in poverty, because she could spend the money on herself (and that would help the poor folks how?) or just give it to those already in poverty??

          How about letting Franklin decide what’s right for her and how about the corporations spending the extra millions they would have paid her to help develop USA swimming in poor communities? There are lots of potential great swimmers in the USA that never see a pool and the sponsors could make money off them in the future, if they’re worried about their bottom line.

          • Swim1 says:
            1
            1

            Your argument about “sponsors” making money is laughable. So is your Missy logic about “her deciding” – just laughable. I am saying her decision IS bad. I know what she has decided!!!! It is a bad one. I am not hiding that at all. I am saying she is wrong and I am right. How hard is that to understand. Every college athlete that picks college over millions is wrong. All of them. I am not mixing words.

  65. Zanna says:
    1
    0

    Franklin 1.00.60, Seebohm was 59.72 in previous heat

  66. Zanna says:
    2
    0

    Behind Missy, all the Americans times for the 100back are far behind.

  67. Thanos Mihas says:
    0
    0

    plummer 53.82 in 1st

  68. Justin Thompson says:
    0
    0

    Slow 1st heat in the mens 100m back, but good swim from Plummer.

  69. pvdh says:
    0
    0

    Here come the big guns

  70. pvdh says:
    6
    0

    LOL Grevers wasnt waiting till tonight to end that record

  71. Justin Thompson says:
    4
    0

    52.91 for Grevers!

  72. Lane Four says:
    1
    0

    Yeah, Grevers!

  73. Thanos Mihas says:
    3
    0

    wow grevers shut it down and still got under 53 !

    • Lazy Observer says:
      0
      0

      Thanos, do you mean he shut down or he shut it down? I can’t see the live feed, so I’m trying to figure out if you mean he slowed down at the end (which I think you mean, since you said “and still…”) or if you mean he powered through to the end.

  74. Zanna says:
    1
    0

    Grevers 52.91 CR I think.

  75. Zanna says:
    0
    0

    Looks like Grevers and Murphy, 53.21 are the top 2 Americans.

  76. Justin Thompson says:
    8
    0

    I can’t believe Irie is only 24. Seems like he’s been around forever.

  77. pvdh says:
    3
    0

    Lets go Murphy!!!

  78. Lane Four says:
    2
    0

    Yeah, Murphy!!!

  79. pvdh says:
    1
    0

    Murphy and Grevers

  80. Thanos Mihas says:
    2
    0

    murphy 53.24 gets second us spot in A final

  81. Zanna says:
    0
    0

    Murphy 53.24

  82. Lane Four says:
    4
    0

    I think we are all taking a break.

  83. klorn8d says:
    10
    0

    I think missy looked great this AM under her circumstances. i’ve had back spasms and its no joke, it took me a week to get even to swim at all again. kudos to the US trainers for getting her healthy enough and her for fighting through the pain i’m sure is there. She’s tough. Im sure she’d be much better healthy.

    • Thanos Mihas says:
      5
      1

      she should skip the 200 free B final tonight and concentrate on the 100 back final. btw i would be surprised if vreeland beats her nationals time of 15640 in the A final but anything is possible

  84. aswimfan says:
    1
    0

    Wow.. two of the early favorites, Franklin and McKeon are out in Bi final

  85. pvdh says:
    1
    1

    that 2nd place girl has a ridiculous stroke rate…

  86. pvdh says:
    3
    1

    oh god stop the commentating…

  87. Lane Four says:
    1
    0

    Becca looks good.

  88. aswimfan says:
    0
    0

    Can anyone please tell me the site for livestreaming for those outside australia?

  89. Steve Nolan says:
    6
    0

    It just took me a half an hour of continuous refreshing to get that stream to pop up.

    Usually I try not to bitch about live streams being crappy, but gotdamn. Isn’t Australia really into swimming!? You’d think they’d be good for this, if anywhere.

    • Lane Four says:
      6
      0

      The streaming is crap. Period. End of discussion. I will never complain about a USA live stream again. NEVER.

  90. Thanos Mihas says:
    3
    0

    mann won second 800 free heat in 822 and took over second spot on worlds team

  91. Zanna says:
    16
    0

    New PB by 4 sec by Becca Man. NBAC training is doing well for her.

  92. Lane Four says:
    2
    0

    WTF???? Becca Mann is now swimming in the 200 fly heat???

  93. Thanos Mihas says:
    2
    0

    mclaughlin 20802, adams 20812

  94. Lane Four says:
    3
    0

    What is going on????? This streaming is horrible! The jumping around is ridiculous. Amateur all the way.

  95. 1
    1

    That side breathing thing in the breaststroke is something that I cannot get used to

  96. Zanna says:
    1
    1

    This feed is crap seriously. I give up. I wanna watch Tom Shields!!

  97. aswimfan says:
    0
    0

    Wowww…the livestreaming is EXTREMELY slow, and I am on high speed broadband

  98. aswimfan says:
    0
    0

    ok it works now

  99. Thanos Mihas says:
    0
    0

    flickinger 20833 beats hoshii americans top 3 times

  100. pvdh says:
    3
    0

    the stream is pretty close to flawless for me

  101. pvdh says:
    0
    0

    Kalisz up

  102. DL says:
    0
    0

    I just now was able to get the live stream. Now I know what you’re talking about in terms of the echo, etc. Pretty funny.

  103. Thanos Mihas says:
    0
    0

    clary third in his heat in 15592 but is safely in the A final

  104. Wonkabar23 says:
    1
    5

    I just realized there is no Chad le Clos in this event and it just got a lot less exciting

  105. Lane Four says:
    2
    0

    Come on Shields! Show us what you can do!

  106. Lane Four says:
    1
    0

    Tying up badly.

  107. Thanos Mihas says:
    2
    2

    shields looke awful, no way he beats phelps in 100 fly !

    • Justin Thompson says:
      3
      7

      Shields peaked two weeks ago.

      • Justin Thompson says:
        3
        3

        That’s funny I get voted down for saying Shields peaked a few weeks ago. Unfortunately it’s very hard to hold a taper for 10 days like that so if he was fully tapered for Nats the reality is that he’ll more than likely be slower at this meet. He should fair much better in the 100 though, I just don’t think he has a sub 51 in him yet. Give the guy another year and he’ll be there.

  108. pvdh says:
    3
    0

    shields verrrrry disappointing

  109. 0
    0

    Matsuda came in 3rd in his heat. Why did I think that he retired after London?

  110. SVIRD says:
    2
    0

    Shields only 157.62. I hope this doesn’t mean he wasn’t able to hold his taper. I want to see him crack 51 in the 100!

    • Justin Thompson says:
      3
      5

      I wouldn’t be too invested in seeing that sub 51 from Shields this meet. He swam the meet of his life at Nats and looks like the taper has faded.

  111. Zanna says:
    0
    2

    Not a good time from Shields but he will still be in Final.

  112. klorn8d says:
    1
    0

    shields DQ’d

  113. 1
    0

    Why was Shields DQ’d?

  114. Rafael says:
    0
    0

    New PB for de Deus! and he looked smooth

  115. Joe says:
    0
    0

    DQ? What happened?

  116. Zanna says:
    3
    0

    He touched the wall with 2 hands at the 100 turn. Official on twitter.

  117. aswimfan says:
    0
    0

    And I have just realized Australia did not even have a swimmer in m200fly.

  118. Porter says:
    0
    0

    Shields is showing a DQ on meet mobile

  119. TheTroubleWithX says:
    7
    1

    Clary’s best event is arguably the 200 back (Olympic gold).
    Shields is still probably more of a 100 fly guy than a 200 fly.
    Kalisz’s focus is on the 400 IM.

    The 200 fly is not the best/main event for either of the three US men who just swam it here.

  120. whoknows says:
    1
    1

    Great Web coverage! The announcers have a lot of feedback. . Hard to understand them along with their accents! Looking forward to some fast swimming at 2:00 a.m.

  121. swimmer24 says:
    0
    0

    What happen to Madeline Groves in the 200 fly? She went 2:13 after going 2:06 in season, I wonder if she is sick.

  122. TheTroubleWithX says:
    2
    0

    Missy is swimming both finals.

  123. PAC12BACKER says:
    1
    0

    What the H? How do you get Deeq’d for a supposed one hand touch at this level? I don’t believe it. Do they have a video of this supposed infaction by Shields?

  124. Gladstone says:
    2
    0

    I just wanted to ask Australian swim authorities that do you really take things seriously in conducting international events if yes why was the live stream not working globally why do we need to reload again and again haven’t you guys watching euro championships or any international events how they are organizing such events..if no please stop conducting events any further until you have everything organised…you guys don’t even have an alternate for live stream that’s pathetic…

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About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson profile

Jared Anderson just can’t stay away from the pool. A competitive career sixteen years and running wasn’t enough for this native Minnesotan, who continues to get his daily chlorine fix. A lifelong lover of writing, Jared now combines the two passions as Senior Reporter for SwimSwam.com, covering swimming at every level. Read More »