Why Alex Rodriguez Pays Ryan Lochte $15,000 a Month

As Sports Illustrated rolls out its annual ‘Where Are They Now?’ issue on former baseball player Alex Rodriguez, one name that has kept swimming in headlines (for reasons palatable and not) appears some 70 paragraphs down in the spread: Ryan Lochte.

For all Lochte has done in the pool– which has amounted to one of the most impressive careers in the sport, as he has collected six Olympic gold medals and over 50 gold medals in major international championships– he has been involved with haphazard mistakes and incidents that have been more tabloid-worthy than anything else. It was hardly surprising when he launched the TV series What Would Ryan Lochte Do in 2013, which the Washington Post called ‘gloriously stupid‘ after E! re-ran the show in 2016 following the forsaken Rio gas station incident.

So, Alex Rodriguez, a public figure who has been hated (here are nine reasons why, according to Fox Sports) but has since smoothed over his image (see this piece in Vice, or the aforementioned feature in SI), is now mentoring Lochte.

Indeed, Rodriguez has a show called ‘Back in the Game’ on CNBC, where he mentors athletes who have hit hard times. When filming for the episode earlier this year, Rodriguez denounces Lochte’s apology for the Rio incident, and gives him wise advice to never again refer to himself in the third person.

“Being with him, learning, having him help me out—it’s amazing what he’s been able to do,” Lochte said.

Rodriguez didn’t just offer him life coaching a la Karamo from Queer Eye, though. He also had Lochte create content for one of the fitness companies A-Rod Corp has invested in, starting him at $15,000 a month. The cash infusion from A-Rod comes on the heels of the sponsorship fallout post-Rio that saw major brands like Speedo and Ralph Lauren pull out of agreements with the swimmer.

Lochte was recently on a season of CBS’s Celebrity Big Brother, through which he trained in the pool. The four-time Olympian is also nearing the end of a 14-month ban following his usage of an intravenous infusion without a therapy-use-exemption (TUE). The ban started on May 24th, 2018, with its conclusion coming at the end of July.

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Brock the Breaststroker

I could use 15k a month

Texas Tap Water

Who doesn’t?

Jeah

Wow. What a boost this has to give Lochte. To have someone in his corner, fighting for him, believing in him and his abilities. Lochte is a good guy to cheer for, and he’s a good person. He seems to care about his family, and I think everyone would love to see him go out on a good note. With that, I’m really excited to see him at Trials next year. My prediction? He’ll shock us all and make a semi final in the 200 free.

Ryan

Omg the last sentence 😂😂. I think he’ll make a final in the 200 IM

Jabroni Pepperoni

I could honestly see him making the team. No one has ever been close to his best time. I know that was so long ago, but Kalisz is the only name I can think of that could be thought of as a lock in that event.

Ryan

I guess we just have to see what kind of shape he’s in atm and if he’s actually been training every day despite the ban. He probably would have need to be a 1:55 mid for Tokyo though. Michael Andrew and Chase won’t be easy to beat, and seliskar might be good if he learns how to swim the IM LC

Provel

And devine

Ryan

Oh yeah forgot abt him

Jabroni Pepperoni

Unless Michael Andrew sweeps the 50’s at World’s this summer and switches his training/goal, I’m not sure if I see him swimming the 2IM at trials.
Before anyone says it, yes I know he’s been 1:57 in season and could probably make the team in that event if he wanted to. But it doesn’t seem like that’s his focus atm.

jeff

In season for him also seems to mean something different than in season for any other swimmers.

Texas Tap Water

Preach, brother!

Observer

I can make smarter choices for 7500…

Ol' Longhorn

Still, at least he’s not a two-time DUIer like our glorious Rio flagbearer.

Swimfan

Glorious indeed. And his DUIs and other perceived “mistakes” were in actuality huge leaps towards ultimately a much wiser, happier, fulfilled man. I’m thankful No one was hurt due to his choices but I’m also thankful he arrived at this place. He is and always will be the GOAT. No true swim fan would blast him.

Ol' Longhorn

He will always be a guy who pled out of a felony DUI to me. On a second DUI arrest. Plenty of sports heroes/heroines who’ve never pled out of a felony charge to hold up as greats. And he will be the GOAT until the next GOAT. Just like Spitz before him. Don’t drive while intoxicated on the KoolAid.

doconc

in your world, only perfect people who have never made a mistake can be admired. Americans love redemption stories. He came back and won.

You are the same guy that bashed Caleb Dressel. Why post???

Swamfan

His DUIs were terrible & we are all so lucky no one was hurt. But people are not their worst mistakes. He has taken responsibility for his mistakes and used his platform to advocate for better mental health care.

Michael Schwartz

You know it’s kindof funny that you said this because I just saw a commercial staring Phelps I had never seen before where he expressed how he suffered from anxiety and depression and was encouraging people to get help if they need it. Was there a sales pitch, yes. Did he seem heartfelt and honest about how therapy helped him and how it can help others suffering from the same issues…also yes. I’ve been critical of him in the best as well, more-so than most of my swimming friends, but as cliche as it is to say, he is only human and I do believe he has become a better person through all of these transgressions and is still trying… Read more »

Ol' Longhorn

Have never heard a peep from him about combatting substance abuse or drunk driving.

camelboar

Maybe because the cause of his substance abuse and drunk driving was anxiety and depression.

Concierge

It is also because he has ADD. Phelps has said that his training affected his social life, as he had to sacrifice so much time to train. It takes a psychological toll on Olympic athletes.

Michael Schwartz

Then you’re either not paying attention or you just decide to bury your head in the sand because after his second DUI in 2014 he checked himself into a 6 week rehab program and then proceeded to state the following on his twitter account after he got out, “Swimming is a major part of my life, but right now, I need to focus my attention on me as an individual, and do the necessary work to learn from this experience and make better decisions in the future.”

Waytogo

I’m sure you’re a perfect person!! Wish we could all be like you! Please keep criticizing people with mental illness who are doing more for this world than you are, clearly.

Concierge

Phelps has admitted he has ADD; attention deficit disorder. It’s why his mom got him into swimming. It helped him overcome the anxiety & issues that go along with ADD. He had anger issues regarding his dad & he turned to drinking to deal with it. I admire that he shared his personal challenges in an interview, & he took responsibility for his mistakes. Phelos went to rehab & to counseling. It shows he’s human. Even Olympic athletes who are multi-millionaires have obstacles & perhaps medical conditions to overcome to be hugely successful. His imperfections made him stronger after he faced them. I respect Phelps for this. He is an incredible athlete & father! He urges others to not be… Read more »

Justin Thompson

You like playing the villian by going there.🤣

Stephen Gomez

I can make even dumber choices for like three fifty (3 dollars and 50 cents that is)

JP input is too short

‘Bout tree fiddy?

Michael Schwartz

Dang Lock Ness monsta’!

Pizza man

And that’s when I realized Stephen Gomez was an about 18 stories tall crustacean from the paleolithic era!

About Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon

Karl Ortegon studied sociology at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT, graduating in May of 2018. He began swimming on a club team in first grade and swam four years for Wesleyan.

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