There is No Off Season

Off-season? What off-season!? Taking short, periodic breaks to rest and reset is fine, but taking huge, prolonged breaks during your off-season isn’t ideal. Even if done in a small way, continuing to train, maintain your level, and refine your skills is important in order to give yourself the best foundation possible going into the following season.

About Will Jonathan

Will Jonathan is a sports mental coach from Fort Myers, Florida. His clients include athletes on the PGA Tour, the Web.com Tour, Major League Baseball, the UFC, the Primera Liga, the Olympics, and the NCAA, as well as providing numerous talks and presentations on the mental aspect of sport and peak performance to various sports programs and organizations across the country.

If you’re interested to learn more about Will and his work, head on over to his website at www.willjonathan.com or connect with him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/_WillJonathan_

 

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41 Comments on "There is No Off Season"

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JP input is too short

Tell that to Caeleb Dressel and the summer he took off before college.

This mindset is what gets kids burnt out by age 16 or earlier.

Steve Nolan

Amen. I didn’t watch the video – the rest of the post didn’t convince me that I should spend 7 minutes watching it – but I sure hope it advocated for doing something *other* than swimming.

Blasting away in the pool 365 days a year is both kinda boring and short changing kids. Go play basketball, or something, be a better all-around athlete.

Will Jonathan
I discuss this in the video. In the video, I talk about how short, periodic breaks are fine, in fact necessary. But, the idea that, as a top level athlete, you can take months-long prolonged time off simply because it’s your “off-season” and fail give yourself a great foundation going into a subsequent season isn’t really ideal. Also, training in the off-season doesn’t have to consist of all out, full throttle, blast-away training. It can be small things: Going for a run every morning, working out in the gym, refining your technique, doing yoga, a million different things. Or, as you said, go and do other sports. I think that’s fantastic, absolutely. The point is, in your off-season, take small,… Read more »
Will Jonathan
I discuss this in the video. In the video, I talk about how short, periodic breaks are fine, in fact necessary. But, the idea that, as a top level athlete, you can take months-long prolonged time off simply because it’s your “off-season” and fail give yourself a great foundation going into a subsequent season isn’t really ideal. Also, training in the off-season doesn’t have to consist of all out, full throttle, blast-away training. It can be small things: Going for a run every morning, working out in the gym, refining your technique, doing yoga, a million different things. In your off-season, take small, periodic breaks, but continue to train in some form so you can maintain your fitness levels, keep… Read more »
JP input is too short

Doing things that aren’t your main sport is, by definition, an offseason for that sport.

Will Jonathan

I can see where you’re coming from, but I was discussing it from a different angle. When I talk about “off-season”, I’m referring to the mentality of, “I’m now in my off-season, so I don’t need to train anymore.” One can still do training while participating in other sports. For example, playing soccer, basketball, or any other highly active cardio sport can help keep your fitness levels up for swimming. You’re indirectly benefiting your swimming while doing other things, which is a win-win.

Does eating ice cream count as an off-season workout?

Will Jonathan

Ha, I wish!

Blackflag82

Also tell that to Aaron Peirsol who routinely took 4 months off after Olympics and Worlds. Swimming is a year round sport which often means there is no off season, but taking large portions of time off to avoid mental fatigue and remain excited about the sport often has enormous benefits.

Will Jonathan
I discuss this in the video. In the video, I talk about how short, periodic breaks are fine, in fact necessary. But, the idea that, as a top level athlete, you can take months-long prolonged time off simply because it’s your “off-season” and fail give yourself a great foundation going into a subsequent season isn’t really ideal. Also, training in the off-season doesn’t have to consist of all out, full throttle, blast-away training. It can be small things: Going for a run every morning, working out in the gym, refining your technique, doing yoga, a million different things. In your off-season, take small, periodic breaks, but continue to train in some form so you can maintain your fitness levels, keep… Read more »
Will Jonathan
Training in the off-season doesn’t have to consist of all out, full throttle training. It can be small, simple things such as going for a run every morning, working out in the gym, keeping up your fitness levels, or refining your technique. Also, I specifically discussed in the video the importance of taking short, periodic breaks to rest the body, the mind, and to re-freshen motivation levels in place of prolonged breaks with little to zero activity. Months-long prolonged breaks where an athlete does little to zero training is fine if they’re in a situation that absolutely demands it. Otherwise, continuing to train while infusing short, periodic breaks in between is a far better approach, as the athlete gets the… Read more »
Swimmer Thieroff

Are you just copying and pasting the same comment to every single post critical of your video?

Will Jonathan

Not every single post/comment, no. Some, yes. It depends on the comment and what the critique is. A few of the comments have more or less the same critique, so to save time, I just replied with the same response. If someone comments with a different critique of the video, I reply back with something different. Some of the critiques have been great and the conversations we’ve had around them have been great as well, so it’s all good!

About Will jonathan

Will jonathan

Will Jonathan is a sports Mental Coach from Fort Myers, Florida. His past and present clients include athletes on the PGA Tour, the Web.com Tour, Major League Baseball, the UFC, the Primera Liga, the Olympics, and the NCAA, as well as providing numerous talks and presentations on the mental aspect of …

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