Was Remedy Rule 200 Fly DQ Correct?

by Robert Gibbs 94

March 19th, 2017 College, News

WOMEN’S 200 FLY

  • NCAA record: Elaine Breeden (2009), 1:49.92
  • American record: Elaine Breeden (2009), 1:49.92
  • U.S. Open record: Elaine Breeden (2009), 1:49.92
  • Championship Record: Kelsi Worrell, Louisville, 1:50.61
  • 2016 NCAA Champion: Kelsi Worrell, Louisville, 1:50.96

Texas Assistant Coach Roric Fink posted a video snippet of Remedy Rule‘s first breakout in the 200 fly final on Twitter Saturday night, hours after Rule was disqualified for remaining submerged past the 15m mark.

In the video above, you can see Rule’s head break the surface of the water very close to the red lines which indicate the 15m mark, and the official posted along that mark immediately raises their hand to indicate a DQ.

The USA Swimming rule book states, “It shall be permissible for a swimmer to be completely submerged for a distance of not more than 15 meters (16.4 yards) after the start and after each turn. By that point, the head must have broken the surface.”

If you have access to the archived ESPN video, you can go back and take a look at it yourself from a different angle, but again, it appears that all you can say for sure was that it was very close.

Rule touched 3rd in the race before the DQ became official, and that cost the Longhorns dearly in the team standings.  Had Rule not been disqualified, those 16 points she would have earned would have put them well ahead of the Georgia Bulldogs for 4th place.  Instead, Georgia finished ahead of Texas by a mere half a point margin, with the Longhorns settling for 5th.

 

AB

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94 Comments on "Was Remedy Rule 200 Fly DQ Correct?"

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MrFahrenheit

Georgia just beat Texas for 4th, not 3rd. Texas A&M was 3rd.

It looks extremely close. Tough call for such an important race.

Yea that was a super close call. I think in such instances, at a meet of this level, you have to error on the side of letting the swimmer’s time stand. As the refs say in Basketball “Let em Play.”

BearlyBreathing

There’s two sides to every story. If she wasn’t DQd what do you tell the girl who finished 4th? Her coach could post the same video asking why there wasn’t a DQ. Not saying it is or isn’t correct but a ref’s decisions affect more than just one swimmer.

I disagree. Every official at every level is told to give the benefit of the doubt to the swimmer. If it’s that hard to tell, you do NOT make the call. So what do you tell the girl who got 4th? You tell her this: “You got beat by a faster swimmer who had a very close 15-meter kickout, but it was too close to call.”

That is correct. In addition, the “head” is defined as anything above the shoulders. The referee should read the “rule.” She was robbed.

Conversely, as a swimmer, you never want to put yourself in a position where an official has to make a difficult judgement call whether or not to DQ you.

As a former swimmer and an official there is nothing more inexact in competition than the 15 Meter mark. Ever shoved the Kiefer lane lines forward? Someone did in one lane and nobody did in another. I feel certain that the championship lane lines were a little tighter and more exact, but when it is close the benefit goes to the swimmer. There are so many officials with stupid big and weird egos to be at big meets like the NCAA Championships texting their wives how incredible it is to be inside the ropes and being the 15 meter monitor………..”stop the presses and let’s get an interview with that official !!” The best referees in the officials’ briefing will say,… Read more »
Agreed, this should not have been called: IMO the official made a mistake. On the other hand there is no video review allowed for such second guessing, so lesson to be learned is: break out at least a foot before the 15m. Same rule of thumb for the sketchy two-hand touches (where one hand brushes and sometimes misses, the wall), IM back-stroke finishes (past vertical towards breast) and relay take offs: staying safe to avoid a call (even if said call is a mistake) can only harm your time by a couple tenths, but doing this, you’ll never be DQed. Plenty of other areas in which to make up the couple tenths. IMO, this discipline is just part of being… Read more »
Steve Nolan

NOOOOOOOPE.

Not video review. Never video review.

Using technology in like, tennis where it’s simple and instantaneous in/our calls? Sure. But it’s a mess in most other sports that have implemented it.

“…Waiting for the penalty?” There is an official posted at the 15 meter mark for that purpose, the correct official made the call. It was close, and possibly wrong, but why is it being debated in an online video. Coach should have followed protocol and protested.

…You’re assuming they didn’t protest the call at the biggest meet of their season?..

We measure and tape it out before meets. The lane line markers are a guide.

Honest Assessment

Great point. You can actually see the tape on the side of the pool, and the official has her foot and line of sight lined up to the tape. Based on that, she does look to be past the mark. It was close, but not as close as the lane markers make it appear.

Having your foot on the line does not give one the correct angle to make the judgement call. Should be several feet behind the mark to get a perspective and align that with the mark on the opposite side of the pool to get a clear vision. Has anyone everyone watched some people building a fence and never use a level except on the first and last post. When one goes and looks down the row of post, they are all in align and one only see the first post. Watch these workers and one will learn something. They stand away from the first post and get good visual on all the other post. I believe the judge made a… Read more »
Having your foot on the line does not give one the correct angle to make the judgement call. Should be several feet behind the mark to get a perspective and align that with the mark on the opposite side of the pool to get a clear vision. Has anyone everyone watched some people building a fence and never use a level except on the first and last post. When one goes and looks down the row of post, they are all in align and one only see the first post. Watch these workers and one will learn something. They stand away from the first post and get good visual on all the other post. I believe the judge made a… Read more »

That particular official should not be working at this level. Terrible price to pay for not knowing the rules.

Tom from Chicago

It looks like Remedy was over by about an inch. That’s a tough call in a fluid surface like water. She is above the waterline at 15m, but hasn’t “broken” the surface. I’m not sure I would call this against the swimmer.

If the “surface” is defined as the horizontal plane of the calm pool, and her head was supposedly above the waterline prior to the 15M mark, what question was asked by the deck ref of the official?

The operative judgment is the bottom of the neck. She cleared by 3-4 inches. Official was 2 feet away. Very poor call.

LoveTheSport
Correct… Official was 2 feet away, and they were actually on the 15m mark, Where were you? This camera angle is shot from a different line that is behind the flags…. it isn’t straight. The version that is on the SwimSwam page of the final day videos shows that she broke the surface after the 15m mark. I get that the coach protested, and he should have. His job is to fight for his swimmer and his team. But the judge was in the right position, called it at the right time without hesitation, and made the call as he saw it. The swimmers who made the swim cleanly deserve to be judged against the others who also swam cleanly.… Read more »

Fyi, Texas coach is a woman

Assistant coach mentioned in article is a man

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