Minnetonka Boys Kick Off Minnesota Finals With National HS Record

The Minnetonka High School boys have broken the National Public High School Record in the 200 yard medley relay, swimming a 1:29.20 at the Minnesota Class AA High School State Championship meet on Saturday.

The relay of Erik Gessner, Corey Lau, John Shelstad, and Sam Schilling combined to beat the 1:29.44 done by Zionsville, Indiana’s medley relay at the Indiana State Championship meet just a week ago. While that old record wasn’t yet certified when Minnetonka improved it, both the IUPUI Natatorium where it was done and the Jean K Freeman Aquatic Center where Minnetonka swam are NISCA certified pools. That means that they don’t need to be measured to certify the records, the coaches just need to submit the paperwork.

Prior to Zionsville, the record was a 1:29.64 set by Chesterton, Indiana’s relay in 2014 – a relay that included future Olympian Blake Pieroni on the fly leg.

Comparative Splits:

Minnetonka ’17 ZIONSVILLE ’17 CHESTERTON ’14
Newest Record Old Record Oldder Record
Erik Gessner – 23.14 Tyler Harmon – 22.68 Aaron Whitaker – 21.90
Corey Lau – 24.82 Brock Brown – 25.18 Jack Wallar – 25.12
John Shelstad – 21.51 Andrew Schuler – 21.79 Blake Pieroni – 21.61
Sam Schilling – 19.73 Jack Franzman – 19.79 Gary Kostbade – 21.01
1:29.20 1:29.44 1:29.64

The meet-opening swim was one of the most anticipated of the meet after the same relay came within half-a-second of the record at the True Team meet, which is a championship meet of sorts, but doesn’t get the same focus or rest as this full state championship does.

The Baylor School’s record of 1:27.74 still stands as the Independent, and overall, high school records.

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Tonka
4 years ago

Terrific swim! Thanks for the article. Meet Mobile says 21.51 for Shelstad.

DI Swimmer
4 years ago

The splits for the new record sum up 4/10s of a second too high

Meistro
4 years ago

This was an absolutely insane meet. 9 New records between prelims and finals broken. Literally rewrote the entire record book.

NEWTOSWIMSWAM
4 years ago

At the meet. By far the fastest HS meet ever in Minnesota and among the fastest in the nation. In addition to Minnetonka’s record-setting 200MR, JohnThomas Larson’s 4:16.92 500FR was the second fastest this season behind Kibler’s 4:15.36 for 18&U, and a solid 1:46 200IM. Sam Schilling’s 100/200FR (44.02/1:35.82) were very impressive as well.

jay ryan
4 years ago

…Kick OFF …

Meistro
4 years ago

Braden- Can you explain the difference between the independent and public national records?

Dave
Reply to  Meistro
4 years ago

Independent = private schools, I think.

bobo gigi
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

And the “true” high school record is the overall high school record.

NEWTOSWIMSWAM
Reply to  bobo gigi
4 years ago

Bobo – The biggest difference, in my view, is that public school record is set by kids who go to the same school where they live (as indicated by Braden), while private schools can have kids from anywhere (different city, state or even country). For example, Joseph Schooling went to Bolles and was a teammate of Ryan Murphy and Santo Condorelli (Canadian Olympian).

notnewtoswimswam
Reply to  Braden Keith
4 years ago

…..or the “online school” team?

NewtoSwimming
Reply to  notnewtoswimswam
4 years ago

Are you referring to JohnThomas Larson who was a team of 1 with online school and his club coach coached him for high school which has always been against Minnesota rules.

NEWTOSWIMSWAM
Reply to  NewtoSwimming
4 years ago

There are several exceptions in MN HS rules that allow a HS swimmer to train with his club team. I looked them up once years ago but don’t know if they still exist or have been amended.

NewtoSwimming
Reply to  NEWTOSWIMSWAM
4 years ago

High school swimmer can train with the club coach during club swimming time, if it doesn’t interfere with high school swim practice.

NEWTOSWIMSWAM
Reply to  NewtoSwimming
4 years ago

If that’s the case, Larson has no high school practice, thus should be allowed to train with his club. Where is the violation? I recall another MN HS rule (again not sure if it is current) which states that a HS swimmer must attend at least three meets during the season in order to compete in the HS State. Not sure if he did it or not.

Someofyoudontread
Reply to  NEWTOSWIMSWAM
4 years ago

Eligibility Brochure- Athletic Rules – 3

Exception: Non-School Training During the High School
Season for Athletes Who Qualify as Individual competitors to
the State Tournament: (Swimming, …

During the MSHSL high school season
athletes may take lessons from professionals and other nonschool
coaches without limit as to where, when or who may
provide the training. Athletes may not miss a high school
practice, game, or meet to take a lesson or train for a non-school
event. Athletes may take lessons and or train with a non-school
team/club during the high school season in the same sport.

NewSwimFan
Reply to  NEWTOSWIMSWAM
4 years ago

As far as I know, he swam at the Tartan invitational, True Team 4AA meet and the Maroon and Gold Invitational (Gold division) where he beat the defending state champion in the 500 yard freestyle.

NEWTOSWSWAM
Reply to  NewSwimFan
4 years ago

If no rules were broken, I’d say he is the champion, although I understand how some of the competitors felt. One can’t claim to be the HS champion knowing very well another HS (public, private, online or home school) kid is significantly faster than you.

tonka
Reply to  NewSwimFan
4 years ago

The defending state champion in the 500 freestyle was also wearing a practice suit while Larson was suited.

JamesJaminos
4 years ago

A team out of Tennessee swam a 1:28.5 in their medley relay — private school I believe. Memphis University School. Fast swimming by these two teams!

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder/co-owner of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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