Minna Atherton Talks First 100 Back PB in 3 Years (Video)

2019 AUSTRALIAN WORLD SWIMMING TRIALS

19-year-old Minna Atherton has emerged back from her early rise in swimming and earned a spot on the 2019 World Championships team in the 100 back.

In prelims, the Brisbane Grammar swimmer led with a 59.25, breaking her 3-year-old lifetime best set at the 2016 Australian Grand Prix of 59.37. In finals, Atherton won the event with a 59.20, another lifetime best and the 3rd-fastest Australian time in history. Finishing behind Atherton was 17-year-old Kaylee McKeown (59.28), who earned her second Worlds event after winning the 200 IM on Sunday. Atherton also out-swam Brisbane Grammar teammate and World champion Emily Seebohm, who finished in 4th with a 1:00.29.

For Atherton, her time has re-established herself as a top Australian senior swimmer after her early success as a junior swimmer. Atherton broke the 50 and 100 back world junior records during her time at 2015 World Juniors and 2016 Queensland States at just 15 years old. Atherton’s first senior team was at the 2016 Short Course World Championships in Windsor, where she swam the 50 back (18th), 100 back (15th), and 200 back (11th). In 2017, Atherton decided to then take a break from swimming to focus on her last year of school.

After her break, Atherton has slowly climbed her way back to the top. At the 2018 Short Course World Championships, she came back with 3 bronze medals, including an individual bronze in the 100 back. This swim now earns Atherton a shot at a newly-minted senior career.

All-Time Aussie Women Performers in the 100 Back

  1. 58.23 Emily Seebohm 1992 London 28.07.12
  2. 58.75 Madison Wilson 1994 Kazan 04.08.15
  3. 59.20 Minna Atherton 2000 Brisbane 06.10.19
  4. 59.25 Kaylee McKeown 2001 Tokyo 09.08.18
  5. 59.29 Belinda Hocking 1990 London 30.07.12

 

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About Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro has had a huge passion for swimming since his first dive in the pool. He joined the sport at age 11 and instantly became drawn to the sport. He was a breaststroker and IMer when competing, but still uses the sport as his go-to cardio. As a kinesiology …

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