Madisyn Cox’s Suspension Reduced to Six Months after Trimetazidine Detected in Multivitamin

The Court of Arbitration for Sport has approved an agreement reducing 2017-2018 USA National Team swimmer Madisyn Cox’s 2-year doping suspension to six months after she was able to establish what had triggered the positive test for Trimetazidine, Cox informed SwimSwam today.  As the initial suspension began March 3rd of this year, she will be eligible for competition next week, on September 3rd.

According to the Cox’s statement and the text of CAS’s consent award, confirming the agreement between Cox and FINA, a WADA-accredited lab in Salt Lake City determined that 4 nanograms of the banned substance were present in both the opened and sealed bottles of Cooper Complete Elite Athletic multivitamin that Cox says she has been taking for seven years, and that she had listed on every doping control form she’s ever had to fill out.

The positive test came in February, 2018, and the FINA doping panel initially gave Cox a 2-year suspension. They cited that, while they found her testimony credible and believed that she did not knowingly ingest the substance, they could not reduce the suspension any further than  2 years without any concrete explanation as to how the Trimetazidine entered her system.

At that time, Cox could only suppose that she had ingested trace amounts of Trimetazidine through drinking tap water in home of Austin, Texas.

In the statement she sent to SwimSwam today, Cox said “I did not immediately test the multivitamin as part of my FINA case because there had never been a recorded case of Trimetazidine supplement contamination in the United States. I mistakenly assumed that the supplement I was taking was extremely safe.”

Cox concluded today’s statement by saying:

The last six months have been a grave and harrowing learning experience that I would not wish on any honest, clean, elite athlete. I know that any supplement – even a multivitamin purported to contain only those ingredients specified on the label and purchased at a local supermarket – can be suspect.

I would advise any athlete who chooses to take supplements to not only consult resources such as USADA’s Supplement 411, but to also make sure that they are third party batch tested to check for any contamination.

I am excited to return to the pool. I also appreciate the support so many people have shown me throughout this trying ordeal.

We asked Cox about any pending legal action against the manufacturer of the supplement, to which she said “we are currently taking everything one step at a time. Finalizing this case has been a burden on me for a while. However, after all is said and done we will move on to consider that step.

 

 

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Mary
3 years ago

Congratulations to Madisyn and her Family!!! I never doubted her! Honesty is will always prevail.

Swimcanada
Reply to  Mary
3 years ago

You are so right! Fina stated her honesty and integrity from the get go! Hate that she had to go through this but hopefully it will help athletes down the road!

25 free champ
Reply to  Mary
3 years ago

So happy for Madisyn but not sure that honesty will always prevail. It did for her but it makes me wonder if there are other athletes who were “caught” doping and never able to clear their name.

Swimcanada
Reply to  25 free champ
3 years ago

Unfortunately I’m sure there are.

Madscientist
3 years ago

Science wins as it should. Be careful of the old adage: You are what you eat!

Pvdh
3 years ago

“Test every everything until we find something that has trimetazidine” – Cox’s lawyer

Swimcanada
Reply to  Pvdh
3 years ago

Stupid statement! She has been taking it and declaring it since high school.

Labnerd
Reply to  Pvdh
3 years ago

Did you bother to read the decision? This was found as a contaminant in a vitamin supplement that she had declared for years with no prior adverse events.
When your reputation and years of effort are called into question, please sit back and don’t defend yourself. You sound like someone who would be happy to do just that. Maybe you’ve never accomplished anything worth protecting.

Madscientist
3 years ago

Know the source of your food and supplements. Know that no matter how famous the brand is, not many outfit will have their own manufacturing labs. The raw ingredients for your supplements will almost always be bought from somewhere else. A world class athlete (and coaches) can not be non-discriminating consumers. Mass-spectroscopy/Maldi-Toff will GET you!

Greg Brance
Reply to  Madscientist
3 years ago

Is it realistic to assume that all athletes that are tested for doping also have the resources to Mass-Spec. everything they take?

Madscientist
Reply to  Greg Brance
3 years ago

I meant WADA will mass-spec everything. I believe the onerous is on the coaches to do the due diligence and over research what their charges are taking. This should be the lesson here. A world class athlete should be meticulously managed including what they take in, IMHO, surely that is not a new idea!

Greg Brance
Reply to  Madscientist
3 years ago

“A world class athlete should be meticulously managed including what they take in, IMHO, surely that is not a new idea!”

So who is going to pay for this type of effort for every athlete that is under US doping control?

These athletes and swim programs don’t have the resources to do what you are asking them to do. College’s are cutting swim programs. Do you really think they have the resources to randomly sample and mass-spec what the athletes are taking? How about club teams? Do you think that parents could afford the dues for something like this type of effort? Anything the athletes eat could have some type of contamination. A athlete could stop at the Cheesecake… Read more »

Madscientist
Reply to  Greg Brance
3 years ago

“Not every athlete” only “world class athletes”. It is a meritocracy you know. Manage your world class athletes well and they’ll give you world class results. Again, not reinventing the wheels here. Agree that USA Swimmimg looks the other way when the goings get tough but basks in the glory when gold medals are handed out.

DrSwimPhil
Reply to  Madscientist
3 years ago

This has to be the first ever reference to MALDI-TOF on swimswam, and I love it!

Kathy
3 years ago

If she were Chinese or Russian all the Americans would be shouting DRUG CHEAT … where are they now? Hypocrites.

anonymous
Reply to  Kathy
3 years ago

The Chinese had the East German trainers there in the early years. Most of the steroid usage by them was in the 1990’s or early 2,000;s. The East Germans everyone knew cheated. As for the Russians, some did and some like had taken something in the grey area.

Labnerd
Reply to  Kathy
3 years ago

That line of reasoning makes so much sense. The Russians and Chinese have never, on a systemic level, been guilty of doping or having curiously aged athletes. Until they show that the USOC is systemically having its athletes (wittingly or unwittingly) use performance enhancing drugs, then you’re attempting to create a false equivalency.

ClassicSwim
Reply to  Labnerd
3 years ago

Chinese Worlds 1994 has been demonstrated as team level cheating.

Russia 2014 (and any other Russian soil competition; aka Kazan) has been demonstrated as team level cheating.

This is a fundamentally false comment by LABNERD.

Madscientist
Reply to  ClassicSwim
3 years ago

Labnerd was being facetious…

Labnerd
Reply to  Madscientist
3 years ago

Kind of thought it was obvious. It’s all in the inflection.

Labnerd
Reply to  ClassicSwim
3 years ago

Sarcasm is sometimes lost in translation. People suspect Russian and Chinese athletes for reasons that you cited. I suppose USP cycling team did create a climate of suspicion for other US athletes.

Togger
Reply to  Labnerd
3 years ago

USP were unique to the sport more than the country I think. I don’t think that should cast doubt any more than T-Mobile’s drug use should reflect on all German athletes.

I think US athletes probably rightly endured more suspicion post BALCO, as the world’s most sophisticated drug lab was found in arguably the epicentre of US Olympic sport.

James
Reply to  ClassicSwim
3 years ago

Oh, you people who cast stones from glass houses. The head of the UCLA lab that was in place for the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics actually re-tested the samples from those Olympics – you know the ones that did not include East Germany and the Soviet Union – using modern technology and discovered more than 1,500 athletes actually tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs during those Olympics. But instead of opening that can of proverbial worms, all re-tested results were destroyed. What a shame, too. Perhaps, if those results had been published people today would not point so many fingers at others, especially knowing the truth about their own. Nothing like the good ol’ red, white and (black) and blue.

Swimcanada
Reply to  James
3 years ago

Interesting. Where do you get your information from?? It still has absolutely no bearing on Ms Cox’s case but I would love to know where you got your information!! Nobody is trying to cover up anything from her case and it is apparently scientifically proven the source and the non therapeutic quantity (I think all would agree you can’t take the quantity necessary given the level found). However I would love to hear your story and the facts behind it! Where were the 1500 athletes from and why is this new information??

James
Reply to  Swimcanada
3 years ago

There are those whose knowledge is first hand, whose seat is front row. I was not speaking of a single case, but of a perception that Russia and China produce the most drug cheats the world has seen, and that while an American athlete can make a mistake, a Russian and a Chinese cannot. Cheating is world-wide. So, why do countries get involved? Because athletes in Russia and China and the rest of the world do not have the money the American athletes do. Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire, Marion Jones, Lance Armstrong, Roger Clemens – millionaires-all – whether they be confirmed cheaters or suspected cheaters. They didn’t need their countries to cheat (allegedly.) They had their own money. Then there… Read more »

Madscientist
Reply to  Kathy
3 years ago

The ideal is for athletic competitions to rise above political rhetorics. Fortunately we are not as quick to deride every athletes from China or Russia these days. In truth we judge each athlete’s actions as reflective of their own and their coach’s integrity not necessarily their country’s.

Right Dude Here
Reply to  Kathy
3 years ago

Kathy there’sa movie you should watch called Icarus.

sane swim parent
Reply to  Kathy
3 years ago

Vladimir, is that you?

Fan
Reply to  Kathy
3 years ago

So I’ve read the Consent Award and pondered the 4ng/tablet and tried to translate that into a Therapeutic dose, ie. beneficial effect to the athlete. If the athlete was attempting to CHEAT what would it take? So if the recommended dosage of Trimetazidine is roughly 60 mg/day, and if there is 4ng/tablet in the multivitamin then mathematically the athlete would have to consume approximately 1.5 BILLION tablets/day to equal a 60 mg dose/day. I’m a physician, but no pharmacist. Maybe a pharmacist could clarify. Since this drug is a ‘hormone modulator’ it would take approximately a month or two to become effective. How could this athlete be possible considered to be CHEATING at this 4ng/tablet dose? Kathy, your assertion is… Read more »

200 SIDESTROKE B CUT
Reply to  Kathy
3 years ago

Um no. We prefer finger-wagging instead.

TheDaveWaltersofSwimSwam
Reply to  Kathy
3 years ago

One is PROVABLE state sponsored mass doping with collusion at the highest levels of sport governance. The other is a one-off case from an athlete with no prior hint of trouble, a predictable improvement curve and PROVABLY tainted supplements. These are not the same things and if you can’t see that, there’s nothing else to say really.

Mike
3 years ago

If that is why she tested positive for a banned substance;it seems to me that she has a pretty good case for a lawsuit against the vitamin company!

Right Dude Here
Reply to  Mike
3 years ago

Didn’t Jessica Hardy successfully sue some company under similar circumstances in 08?

Joel Lin
Reply to  Right Dude Here
3 years ago

I believe you are thinking of the Kicker Vencill case, which he prevailed in.

Right Dude Here
Reply to  Joel Lin
3 years ago

That would be correct. Thank you

dewey
Reply to  Right Dude Here
3 years ago

They sued her first; she had no intention of suing them.

Madscientist
Reply to  Mike
3 years ago
Togger
Reply to  Mike
3 years ago

Interesting idea.

Could she sue in contract?

She could certainly make an argument of an implied term. If the supplement manufacturer knew she was a pro athlete, I think there would be a strong case. If she just bought it over the Internet or walk in store like anyone else, is it an implied term of a supplement transaction with John/Jane Doe that the supplement is WADA safe? Probably not.

Could she sue in tort?

Is there a duty of care between Cox and the manufacturer? Yes.

Is it negligent for a reasonable vitamin manufacturer, acting in the ordinary course of business, to include trace amounts of WADA banned, but not illegal, substances in its… Read more »

Swimcanada
Reply to  Togger
3 years ago

Would the fact that the drug detected is illegal In the US and yet this multivitamin is manufactured and marketed in the US make a difference?

Togger
Reply to  Swimcanada
3 years ago

I don’t know US punitive damages etc., so it might be a bigger deal, but in England I think it would be tactically helpful.

Purely legally, the vast majority of Cox’s damages would arise from the fact she’s an athlete who tested positive, so if it went to trial the focus would be on the WADA ban, rather than the US illegality.

However, tactically it means she can go to them early and say “Settle for a sum reflective of my claim as an athlete, or I’ll sue you for negligence for putting an illegal substance in the product. The damages would be modest, but every single one of your customers can bring the same claim after that… Read more »

Swimming Fan
Reply to  Togger
3 years ago

Among other causes of action, she will likely assert multiple claims under the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Act which allows for treble damages and attorneys’ fees.

Nswim
3 years ago

Well at least she’ll be able to complete at the World Cup stops and possibly SC worlds. I’m hopeful for her career to come, she is very talented!

USA
3 years ago

Looks like it’s safe to drink tap water now

Bear drinks beer
Reply to  USA
3 years ago

Dating with Dean Farris paid off.

Old Man Chalmers
Reply to  Bear drinks beer
3 years ago

Dean Farris himself lessened her sentence

Togger
Reply to  Old Man Chalmers
3 years ago

Who do you appeal to when the Almighty’s recused for conflict of interest?

Madscientist
Reply to  USA
3 years ago

But stay away from the Flinstones…