ISL First 5: Toronto Retains Skins Talent In Masse, Ryan, McKee

The Toronto Titans focused in on their returning point-scorers from the skin races, retaining a number of top stroke sprinters.

Toronto will retain Kylie Masse, Anton McKee, Shane Ryan, Blake Pieroni and Kelsey Wog for 2021.

Masse was the team’s MVP in regular-season scoring last year, placing 14th league-wide in individual scoring. She also won a 50 back skins race – one of the key point-scoring avenues in the ISL format.

McKee was #59 in individual scoring and also made a skin race semifinal. Ryan tied for the #40 overall scoring spot and also made two skins semifinals in the 50 back. Wog was the team’s second individual scorer behind Masse, earning 120 points for the #20 scoring spot leaguewide over the regular season.

Notable names not yet retained: Lisa Bratton (#53), Louise Hansson (#64), Tess Cieplucha (#73), Michelle Coleman (#83) and late 2020 withdrawal Alberto Razzetti.

Coleman was the only other Titan to make it beyond the first round of a skins race

DRAFT/PLAYER RETENTION RULES

First, a quick refresher on personnel rules, as announced by the league:

Each team can retain up to 16 swimmers from their 2020 rosters across six different rounds of retention:

  1. 5 pre-selected athletes to retain
  2. 4 athletes announced in round 1 of retention
  3. 3 athletes announced in round 2 of retention
  4. 2 athletes announced in round 3 of retention
  5. 1 athlete announced in round 4 of retention
  6. 1 athlete voted on by fans (this round of retention comes after the first round of the ISL draft, though)

After that, players not retained will fall to the ISL Draft Pool, where the Aqua Centurions and DC Trident will each have a first-round pick. The Draft Pool will include unretained players, but also ISL rookies, like NCAA graduates and other new ISL additions.

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About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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