Delaware Blue Hens get verbal from NCAP flyer/backstroker Julia Capobianco

Nation’s Capital Swim Club’s Julia Capobianco has verbally committed to swim for the Delaware Blue Hens next season, bringing an instant point-scoring threat to the CAA program.

Capobianco is part of the NCAP program that has become a national powerhouse over the past few years, and looks like an instant-impact addition for Delaware.

She’s best as a butterflyer, but also brings a very good 100 back to the table, which makes three solid events if she can pull the 100 back/100 fly double on the second day of the college championship meet order.

Capobianco’s Top Times

  • 100 fly: 56.12
  • 200 fly: 2:07.45
  • 100 back: 57.26

Both of those butterfly times would have scored at last year’s CAA Championships, and with a little more development, Capobianco could turn out to be a perennial conference finalist for the Blue Hens. That’s a big pickup for a team that graduated both of its point-scoring butterflyers from last season.

Capobianco also swims for the dominant Oakton High School program that has won three straight Virginia 6A high school state titles.

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Jeffrey Spillers
6 years ago

Way to go Julia and Capobianco family!!! So proud and what an accomplishment!

samuel huntington
6 years ago

NCAP become dominant over “the past few years”? NCAP is what was formally known as Curl Burke and that program has been dominant for about 30 years. I will admit NCAP has been in a golden age recently but it has been a force for decades.

Meena
6 years ago

Way to go, Julia! Congratulations.

gator
6 years ago

Congrats to Julia, nice get for the Hens and you gotta love her last name!!! It will be rolling off the Delaware swim announcer’s tongue for the next 4 years!

Jessica Fry
6 years ago

Congrats, Julia! I’m so proud of you!

Allie
6 years ago

JULES you are a rockstar!

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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